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21

I'd like to say, this does not answer your question directly, but I think you're looking at the problem the wrong way. Do you really want a 400 Watt computer running all day just to screen a couple phone calls? I think Both "what do I do with a Pentium I" and "How do I screen calls" are both excellent questions, but IMHO I think you should split these. Im ...


16

Yes, there is a software/hardware that can achieve this, and relatively cheaply. Asterisk is an open-source (free) PBX software, that can do what you need, and more. Asterisk is usually used on linux, although there are pre-packaged virtual machine appliances available. There are also lots of Asterisk-derivatives, like PbxInAFlash, TrixBox, and others, that ...


7

Considering you have several hundred metres (or maybe several Km) of phone wiring + joints & cabinets between your socket and the local exchange/CO, a few more metres is not generally going to make a significant difference. That said, some extension leads and reels use very poor quality cable that can really mess up broadband signals due mainly to the ...


6

If you use Chrome as your browser, then you can get a Google Voice account and the Google Voice extension. Then you'll be able to click on a number and it will route it to your phone.


6

According to airplane security regulations, you are not allowed to use cellular connections on an airplane. As far as I know, it is technically possible to make phone calls (via the 2G network). 3G has lower range, so it could be impossible to connect from that altitude.


6

While not a direct answer to your question, someone has accomplished something similar to this using a Raspberry Pi. Their full article can be found here but the summary is that they've used a phone to Ethernet adaptor (like the one @Rich Homolka mentions in his answer) wired in to the Pi and a couple of scripts to make sure that the caller is a person or ...


5

My question is: would my connection be significantly faster if I moved the modem and used a short, high-quality phone cable between the modem and the wall? It's not easy to answer. Yes, probably. Note that your question uses the words "significantly faster". This is what I cannot tell you. This could only be answered after testing because it depends ...


5

The Windows Phone 8 emulator runs in it's own (Hyper-V) VM with it's own networking and MAC addresses. Using the Hyper-V Manager --> Actions --> Virtual Switch Manager, check the setup of the virtual switch; I believe that by default it's set to "Internal network" which mean no outside access. "An internal virtual network is not bound to a physical ...


4

Check out iCall. You must call within the US or Canada to use it free.


4

You can plug standard "square" RJ14 cables into a RJ45 jack, as long as the port is wired to your phone line. It should click in. You need to figure out which ports are wired where.


4

You could try going into the Device Manager and setting the device to disabled.


4

You can listen to the line using Hayes A.T. commands: Open up Hyperterminal (if running Windows) and connect to your modem's COM port (usually COM3). Type ATM2 and hit enter. This will enable the speaker. Enter ATH0 and hit enter to 'take the phone off the hook'. You should hear a dial-tone. This should work if you are being called. I know how to dial ...


4

Sure you can do this. Hook the modem up to the phone line. You will need a terminal program to control the modem. Granted, I havent seen one in years and MS doesnt include one with Windows anymore, but Im sure if you google it, you can find one. You might even be able to pipe the command "ATA" to the COM port in command window. FYI "ATA" is the Hayes ...


3

Look at the SKINNY (SCCP) protocol: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skinny_Call_Control_Protocol. It is a binary protocol (as you can see in your Wireshark captures), so you can't use PuTTY to command your phone with AT-like commands. Typing hex digits in PuTTY is useless, as the data that is transmitted in the packets is not the hexadecimal digits, but the ...


3

In a past, evil life I worked on the technical side of the telemarketing industry. I'm sorry. Something that works very well is to quickly stop the caller in their tracks and say, "Please add me to your do-not-call list." By law they have to stop what they're doing and add you to the list. Sometimes they'll ask if you're sure, but that's about it. Just ...


3

As emddudley said, it should plug right in. Just make sure you get the wiring correct. Plugging a phone into a jack wired for ethernet probably won't be a problem. Plugging a network device into a jack wired into the phone system is bad. Phones ring by having a voltage sent down the line, enough to ring a physical bell on old rotary phones. Network ...


3

I don't know much about the subject in question but i know that THE open source software to do this is Asterisk, it can do what you want and more, i'd search for compatible hardware for it.


3

You could use two modems with a Dual-WAN router, although load-balancing would be rather pointless in a home, in my opinion. Why pay for two broadband contracts?


3

Allow me to answer your question from a purely technical point of view. This is what I would do if I was in your position and sharing your motivations: Google the modem and download the technical info - if you can't find any then it's probably too much hassle. While you are at it download the reference on the Hayes command set (AT commands, etc) blow away ...


3

It's possible to do what you want but so complicated it's probably not worth it and you are limited to 10/100 speeds on your LAN. 100Mbit Ethernet only uses 4 of the 8 wires in a Cat5 cable. They make "splitters" that give you two RJ45 ("Ethernet") jacks - one jack uses the first 4 wires, the other jack uses the second 4 wires. Put one on the other side ...


3

Resolved! In order to avoid this: I emailed a professor that I know, and he has resolved the issue - sad to say, e220 does not support voice calls. As per http://bit.ly/wSDoGW, I was able to check for voice compatibility in minicom: AT+FCLASS=? +FCLASS: (0-1) OK For voice support, the list of numbers returned by FCLASS must include 8 - thus, this ...


3

You might try running Asterisk, which is: Asterisk is an open source framework for building communications applications. Asterisk turns an ordinary computer into a communications server. Asterisk powers IP PBX systems, VoIP gateways, conference servers and more. It is used by small businesses, large businesses, call centers, carriers and ...


3

Asterisk is free and a simple FXO/FXS adapter with 1 port like you need won't cost $400. Try looking for linksys SPA3102 for example and an example config. You don't need to buy expensive multi-ports internal cards. Why don't you go SIP and need no adaptor, only the internet conection your BOX delivers? With Sip, you will receive the call for free if you ...


2

Software products for making land-line calls over modem have almost all disappeared from the world. A remnant from these days may be NCH Software. However, it is quite unclear whether your modem will support such a feature. And in any case, all these products cost money to start and more to use. You might as well go ahead and use Skype for your calls, as ...


2

One I have lying around (and I don't use it 'cos it failed to detect a network cable was bad), but I still have it on the table here, it has 2 parts like yours, and is even the same model number as yours. NS-468. On the one I have The main part has an actual RJ11 socket on it next to the RJ45. It doesn't have USB and BNC. and the detachable part has an ...


2

Yes, the keyword is "tethering". Go to Wireless and networking settings, choose "Tethering and hotsopt" and then enable Mobile AP. Connect both computer and laptop to this wifi - they will see each other. Most probably.


2

No, you do not need to use DSL line filters on phones attached to VoIP equipment. These should be used only to phones connected to your landline connection (which you don't have with naked DSL).


2

Yes, there are many "Chat" programs that support voice. Your best option would be find one that uses a server that your company controls so the "Call" never leaves your network and you are not relying upon a 3rd party service to be up. I do not know if it is free or it costs money but at my work we use Lync by Microsoft, but that is due to the integration ...


2

Every protocol has overhead. The "LAN" copy you're talking about it most likely SMB/CIFS. CIFS is quite prone to being badly configured(and thus slow) and overall has more overhead than FTP. FTP is a very simplistic protocol. It's hard to get it wrong. CIFS is a complex protocol, most likely the implementation on the phone is either limited or slightly ...



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