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0

Think I found the answer. My NAS had been set up to be the IPV6 Gateway by default when enabling IPV6. Since I turned this off the problems disappeared. All this IPV6 stuff is too complicated, hope there will be easier solutions in the future!


0

Sounds like your downstairs repeater is doing NAT, which acts as a kind of a poor man's firewall that blocks incoming connections from the upstream side of the NAT. Make it not do NAT.


0

Looking at your home Internet tracroute makes me feel this is a double-NAT issue between your modem and your router: Tracing route to sgp-1.valve.net [103.28.54.1] over a maximum of 30 hops: 1 5 ms 20 ms 18 ms DD-WRT [192.168.11.1] 2 * * * Request timed out. 3 * * * Request timed out. 4 76 ...


0

I'd probably be lazy and just make a very basic BAT file: :Ping ping {whatever it is you are pinging} >>ping.log sleep 3600 goto :Ping Of course, not everybody has the sleep command, but it's part of Cygwin, and there are probably other ways to "wait an hour".


0

This looks like a one-way routing issue. Your routes are all set up correctly, and the packets get to their destination. When the destination attempts to reply, it has no idea how to reach network 192.168.1.0/24. It will send the traffic to its default gateway, which is the ISP router 192.168.0.1. If you add a route on the ISP router to 192.168.1.0/24 ...


2

You don't just assign Ethernet interfaces IP addresses. You assign them IP addresses on a network. And they then get a route to the other IP addresses on that network. LANs wouldn't work without special configuration were this not the case. The /16 in "192.168.5.1/16" means there are 16-bits in the network portion of the address. This means there are 16 ...


0

Your can press Ctrl + C to stop things that's "not stopping". On some systems might be Ctrl + Break. Anyway, sometimes it does not stop immediately, or it won't response to Ctrl + c due to high load of system resources. so you might want to press Ctrl + C many times.


2

Each ISP is responsible for: Deciding where to send it's own packets, From whom to receive packets, and Whether any received packets will be send on somewhere else. All of the above is by agreement with a transit provider. The agreement with the transit provider allows: The advertisement of customer routes to other ISPs, thereby soliciting inbound ...


2

Perhaps because ISP B simply does not have enough resources to carry someone else's traffic, at least not without negotiating payments first. It's even possible that it might be a much smaller ISP than either A or C, so their traffic would completely overwhelm its own. The internet is not a pure mesh network of equal nodes – some companies deal purely with ...


0

Those unstable ping times aren't your problem. MacBooks use 802.11 Power Save mode. With a typical ping interval of 1 second, the receiver keeps going to sleep between pings. If you had real traffic going on, the receiver wouldn't go to sleep in the middle of it, so you wouldn't have this latency. Keep looking for the source of the slowness. You haven't ...


2

You are comparing apples and oranges. Your endpoint is the same, but your starting points are not. You say the starting points are roughly the same distance, but in the virtual world, things dont travel in a straight line, or by the same methods. If you are on Windows, run the command pathping to your destination from both points and that will most likely ...


-1

you need to put the -6 option ping -6 ipv6.google.com


2

Is this normal? Yes and no. Yes, in that it's a common problem and not everyone considers it a problem. No as in under ideal conditions, it wouldn't happen. How can it be fixed? By telling your ISP to get a faster connection to the target network. For most consumers, this basically means it's out of your control. The issue has nothing to do with you or your ...


0

Packet size is another possible cause of network issues. I had a similar problem recently. ping works, so I have internet connectivity, but most TCP-based connections hang and finally time out. It turns out that my wireless card is buggy or under-powered and is not handling large packets properly. One of the differences between ping and most TCP connections ...


0

It is only a problem with services & customers with that ISP, but if you are not served by that ISP it should not be a problem to you. You don't state if you are dependent on that ISP at all. To use an analogy, the drive of your neighbour is blocked but you can freely drive your car around on little congested roads. It is only an issue to your ...


0

The routing table didn’t change, but the destination did. And that’s what’s looked at when trying to find the next hop. Some routing table along the way had a different next hop for destinations 94.2.55.112 and 99.34.xx.xx. Not strange at all, considering they’re in different /8 subnets. While it may seem that way, routes are not necessarily defined with ...


0

It needs a couple of explanations: First of all, how traceroute works: Traceroute sends a package to the destination IP (94.2.55.112) with TLL=1 The receving router decrements TTL and because TTL=0 discards the package and returns a TTL exceeded Traceroute sends a package to the destination IP (94.2.55.112) with TLL=2 The receving router decrements TTL ...



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