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If you're located in France (*), one such attempt is Grenouille. It's free but it used to under-assess my bandwidth when I was using it a few years ago. Note that both the website and software are in French. (*) http://grenouille.com/ma_grenouille/modify.php says: Ami(e)s belges, suisses ou qu├ębecois (et autres pays francophones) : grenouille.com ...


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You can monitor connection quality over time with Smokeping. In a single graph you get round-trip time, jitter and packet loss. Excellent to monitor links.


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If you have both boxes on different subnets inside your VM set they may never talk. The subnets being different are they both using the same gateway? Are they being NAT'd. Your question needs more information in order to better assist you. A layer 3 switch would allow for this but you would need to either have a VM switch or you would need dedicated NICs ...


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The same situation happened on me as well. I figured the VirtualBox adapter somehow must have higher priority than other LAN. Try and see if this helps https://www.virtualbox.org/ticket/8698


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Go to IP -> Firewall -> NAT, click the blue + to add a rule, Chain is srcnat, Out interface is ether1 - or whatever ether you get your internet from. Then go to the Action tab and select Masquerade.


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Your question is not phrased very clearly. System B can ping A and C because it has two NICs, one on each network [1.x.x.x and 2.x.x.x] If you make 2.2.2.2 the default gateway for system c, and if 1.1.1.2 is the default gateway for system A, you need a route in system B to transverse networks. What i'm getting at, is normally (IME) dual NICs act completely ...


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quite simply - www0.sun.ac.za is a registered dns record (IP is 146.232.66.100), take a look at: http://network-tools.com/default.asp?prog=dnsrec&host=www0.sun.ac.za a dns record doesn't have to be www.xxx.com or similar, it can be anything... try to think of it as "ac" is a record within "za", "sun" is a record within "ac", "www0" is a record within ...


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You could also use nping (part of nmap): $ nping -p 80 localhost Starting Nping 0.6.00 ( http://nmap.org/nping ) at 2014-06-23 11:57 CEST SENT (0.0015s) Starting TCP Handshake > localhost:80 (127.0.0.1:80) RECV (0.0016s) Handshake with localhost:80 (127.0.0.1:80) completed SENT (1.0027s) Starting TCP Handshake > localhost:80 (127.0.0.1:80) RECV ...


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Alternatively, You could use Paping Usage : paping www.google.com -p 80 -c 4


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This has certainly nothing to do with your pc/OS/router. I run several Linux systems, none of them replied the way yours does. As pointed out already, this is, most likely, a trick played by your ISP. There are two things that you can do about this. On the one hand, you can study your ISP's behaviour by downloading, installing and running Namebench, a ...


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What you want to acomplish is test comunication ? or what respond to port 80 on that node? Due to PING will try to acomplish comunication to a especific host trought the ICMP, nothing to do with ports. probablity you need http://nmap.org/ to test port info and communications. nmap -v -p 80 onofri.org


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Well, it turns out Optimum isn't as bad* as I thought. When navigating to one of these non-existent domains in my browser, I am shown the hijacked Optimum DNS Assistance page... with an option to opt-out of the service! So opt out I did, and now all of my invalid DNS lookups return NXDOMAIN, as they should. Granted, this only applies to Optimum customers, ...


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Yes, use HPing to do that: $ sudo hping -S -p 80 google.com HPING google.com (p5p1 77.237.27.37): S set, 40 headers + 0 data bytes len=46 ip=77.237.27.37 ttl=58 id=25706 sport=80 flags=SA seq=0 win=29200 rtt=7.5 ms len=46 ip=77.237.27.37 ttl=58 id=25707 sport=80 flags=SA seq=1 win=29200 rtt=7.4 ms len=46 ip=77.237.27.37 ttl=58 id=25708 sport=80 flags=SA ...


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OK, I've got it working. I had to telnet into the CLI of the TG582n and run nat ifconfig intf Multicast translation enabled. I have to confess that I don't really know what this means...


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You can use netcat to connect to a specific port to see if you get a connection. The -v flag will increase the verbosity to show whether the port is open or closed. The -z flag will cause netcat to quit once it has a connection. You can then use the exit codes through $? to see whether or not the connection was established or not. $ nc -zv localhost 22 ...


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I use Telnet, since its built into lots of platforms with no additional downloads. Just use the telnet command to connect to the port you want to test. If you get the message below, or a message from the service itself, then the port is alive. Minty16 ~ $ telnet localhost 139 Trying 127.0.0.1... Connected to localhost. Escape character is '^]'. If you ...


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Ports are a concept of UDP and TCP. Ping messages are technically referred to as ICMP Echo Request and ICMP Echo Reply which are part of ICMP. ICMP, TCP, and UDP are "siblings"; they are not based on each other, but are three separate protocols that run on top of IP. Therefore you can not ping a port. What you can do, is use a port scanner like nmap. nmap ...


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When you use -S option, your outgoing ICMP echo request packets are sent out with with the IP timestamp option, more precisely with IP timestamp and flag 1, meaning each router along the path of your ICMP packet inserts it's IP+TIMESTAMP in a special zone of the IP header. There is room for only 4 IP:TIMESTAMP pairs in the header, hence the limitation to 4 ...


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You are looking for mtr. I always leave mtr 8.8.8.8 running. If you're not familiar with 8.8.8.8, it's Google's global DNS service, using anycast, so you always get a nearby node, and it's a dead easy IP to remember. So it works no matter where you are located, and if you move. Once mtr starts press d once, then you'll see the last X pings, beautiful. ...



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