New answers tagged

0

==> You should verify with your Campus network administration following: 1) Your Windows8 host Ethernet Link connects to the same Router which facilitates Wifi internet and Ethernet internet. 2) There is no MAC address based filtering on Router. ==> If your Windows8 Ethernet link directly or via Ethernet Switch connected to wireless router's Ethernet link, ...


1

Your Firewall is configured to block all ICMP packets, as a result you can not send ICMP echo request packets to external networks. To resolve this issue you need to contact the network administrator and request him to disable this firewall rule. Additionally try resetting cable modem.


0

the timeout switch is not the same as what you are looking for as a 'wait' switch. The timeout switch with Windows ping command simply tells the command window how long to wait before RECEIVING the reply, not how long to wait before sending the NEXT reply.


0

Yes, there can be further issues with the networking that ping would not be able to detect. Ping is just a tool that normally tells the user "Yes this device can communicate with the other device and it takes this long to do it." or "The other device did not respond to my requests in the amount of time that was allotted." Ping isn't really designed for ...


1

Most likely, your Win firewall has ICMP/ping turned off. To enable: Control Panel --> System and security --> Windows Firewall --> Advanced settings --> Inbound rules --> New rule --> custom rule Then in Protocol and ports: Protocol: ICMPv4 on the same panel go to customize, choose "Specific ICMP types", check the box "echo request" Do the "save/enable" ...


0

This is probably ICMP control message Type 3 (destination unreachable) Code 3 (Port unreachable) It means there is no server process associated with that TCP or UDP port at the destination. "One rule of UDP is that if it receives a UDP datagram and the destination port does not correspond to a port that some process has in use, UDP responds with an ICMP ...


0

Solved. Very newbie mistake! The Raspbian was on a different netmask: 255.255.255.0 And my PC wa on 255.255.255.0


0

I've bumped into the same problem and what worked for me was filtering the IP address using: arp.dst.proto_ipv4 == {My.Dst.IP.Address} instead of: ip.addr == {My.Dst.IP.Address} and then I could see the ARP messages even though I couldn't see the IP messages.


0

The data portion is mandatory in reply packets, if there is a data portion in the request packet. The answering system must send a reply containing exactly the same data portion. The RFC792 does not specify if the data portion in the request packet is mandatory. The Data in this schema is not marked as (optional) as in many other RFCs. 0 ...


0

You can use host discovery with nmap on Unix / Linux: nmap -sP 192.168.1.1/24 or nmap -sn 192.168.1.1/24 This command makes a discovery that consists of an ICMP echo request, TCP SYN to port 443, TCP ACK to port 80, and an ICMP timestamp request by default. If a firewall is blocking ICMP echo and ports 80 & 443 then it won't work. One option is ...


0

to know the number of systems are connected to your network, Go to run and type cmd and press enter. A command window will appear simply type arp -a and this command will return a list of connected systems. You can try another way Step 1: - Go to start and click on Control Panel. Step 2: - Type Network in the search box and press enter. Step 3: - Now ...


0

This problem happens due to your wireless key version and encryption type incompatible with your system. I've also faces such a problems in my TP-link router. TO fix the problem set the version as WPA/PSK and encryption type as AES. And if your router have option to select automatic in both case than choose automatic or default settings.


1

The reason for it working when "All programs" is selected and not when using the ping.exe seems to be that the firewall does not see the source/destination program for the ICMPv4 traffic, and only sees the "System" process and that the "System" process falls under the "All programs" category. Note that In the field where it is asking for a full path to ...


0

OK, I've established this is a fault with the Windows TCP/IP stack Rather than a single website, numerous sites all located at the shared 1 & 1 Internet hosting service at 217.160.230.255 are inaccessable for me. Windows 95, 98 and onwards through to XP & Server 2003 are all unable to communicate with hosts with IP addresses of the format x.x.x.255 ...


0

Your PC may have a MTU of 1500, but your router or ISP may not. It would seem you are exceeding the Maximum Transmission Unit somewhere upstream, thus pings over a certain size are being dropped (since you are explicitly saying 'don't fragment' with -f). Standard windows ping packets are 32 bytes. Non-standard ping packets may be seen as possible DoS ...



Top 50 recent answers are included