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5

As far as the TCP and UDP protocols are concerned, ports are all the same. Any of them can be used for a service/daemon to listen on, any of them can be port-forwarded in a NAT (a.k.a. NAPT, PAT) gateway, and any of them can be used for a client to initiate a connection from. Historically, a lot of well known protocols, such as HTTP (80), have been assigned ...


4

Well-Known Ports The port numbers in the range from 0 to 1023 are the well-known ports or system ports. They are used by system processes that provide widely used types of network services. On Unix-like operating systems, a process must execute with superuser privileges to be able to bind a network socket to an IP address using one of the well-known ports ...


4

If you are behind a router (more precisely, a NAT), and the other side of the connection is behind a router, you can not directly connect to each other. This is true for BitTorrent as well, so if you are behind a router and you do not have a port forwarding configured, then you will not be able to download (or upload) from any other user who has the same ...


2

Your router's web admin UI screenshot looks a filtering/firewalling rule, for blocking traffic, not forwarding it. It doesn't look like a port forwarding / port mapping rule. You're probably in the wrong part of the UI. Look for something like "Port Forwarding" or "Port Mapping".


2

They're just numbers. You don't need to think of them as any more complicated than that. For instance, TCP port 80 is widely recognized as being the HTTP port. Because that service was recognized as being important, it was given a relatively low number on IANA's ports list. (Click the "XML" hyperlink on that page if you want to see the whole list, not ...


2

You need to ensure the routing path is complete from internet machines to your desktop. For this to work you need to remove all port blocks (firewalls) for the ports you are interested in exposing, and also ensuring that trafic is routed from your public IP address to the server's IP (if the server is private). This is normally all accomplished on your home ...


2

If you're trying to connect from within the same network it won't work. You can't access your own external IP. You can use a port forward tester website, there's loads around, to check that the ports are open and accepting traffic, but for a true test you'll need to attempt to connect from another internet connection altogether.


1

As @Deadly-Bagel has pointed out, your modem/router may not be permitting NAT loopback i.e the ability for your LAN clients to access services (such as a web server) via your own public IP. Resource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_address_translation#NAT_loopback What's probably happening is Your Kryo client is connecting to your DDNS server (by ...


1

Yes, option: purchase access with a VPN service that allows for a static IP and port forwarding, you will be able to have clients talk directly to your device(s) as you'd expect. Option two: Find a deal on a VPS (Virtual Private Server) and configure a popular VPN software like OpenVPN yourself. End result is the same, configuration part is much more ...


1

VPN stands for virtual private networking. VPNs connect 2 different private networks across a public network, or to connect a single host to a private network. By private I mean not publicly routable. Your friends address 10.1.10.213 lies in private network range that is not publicly routable so he probably has a small home/office router performing NAT ...


1

I think the problem with your example is the final arguments; you are sshing to B, when you should be listing the "final destination", albeit the port-forwarded host/port, which is port 10000, but should be localhost, not B, as B is resolved from the perspective of A, and port 10000 on B is probably not open externally. E.g., corrected: ssh -ti ...


1

I suspect you are using Active FTP. Active FTP requires that the client be able to listen on an incoming port. A service like CanYouSeeMe is probably configured to support this, automatically opening the incoming port when needed. However, if your client is behind NAT (that is different from your server's NAT) then the client will not be able to use Active ...


1

The other answer is technically incorrect. If I have my ports closed, I can make outbound connections to someone who has their ports forwarded. If my ports are forwarded, others can make inbound connection to my client. If both have ports forwarded, it does not matter. Connection streams need to be initiated by only one of the clients, so even though an ...


1

Your ISP probably does not throttle by port, but by packet inspection. Either way, you should use a client that can A)Randomize the port used, B)Encrypt the traffic so that it can't be inspected. This way you shouldn't be throttled.


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Your definition for dynamic ports looks clearer in some ways, than any of the answers. You write dynamic ports are client side and are used only for the active session. once it expires the port becomes available again. These are only used so the traffic comes back to the correct user". I'd just amend that last word to "client". Users aren't ...



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