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14

Why does it have to be postfix directly? mailx -a, mutt, or mutt -a will also use the sendmail interface -- unless you configure them for SMTP. echo "This is a test message" | mutt -s Test -a foo.zip -- $USER echo "This is a test message" | mail -s Test -a foo.zip $USER Anyway, here's a "postfix" example. Replace $USER, content type and filename to ...


14

No, it is not required to set up a DNS cache on the server. The server should use a caching DNS resolver that's somewhere nearby, but most hosting companies already run their own resolvers for the entire datacenter and configure servers to use them by default. By default, both Postfix and Dovecot use local accounts for everything. If you have a Linux ...


9

Add this to your main.cf: alias_maps = regexp:/etc/postfix/aliases Then create /etc/postfix/aliases as follows: /^tom\..*@domain.com$/ tom@other.com /^phil\..*@domain.com$/ phil@other.com See the regexp table documentation for additional information.


8

You can use the inet_interfaces directive in /etc/postfix/main.cf to control what address Postfix listens on for incoming connections. If you set it to the following it will only listen on the loopback interface, which means that connections can only originate from that machine. inet_interfaces = loopback-only


8

In CentOS, this binary is provided by the mailx package: yum install mailx FYI, as the message at the bottom of your post indicates, you are using whatprovides incorrectly. Proper usage searching mirrors for a file called 'mail' would have been: yum whatprovides */mail


8

If you only want it running on port 587 (and I'm not sure you do; I'd think you'd want it running on both 25 and 587), then find the line in /etc/postfix/master.cf that looks like this: smtp inet n - n - - smtpd And change it to look like this: 587 inet n - n - - smtpd If you want ...


7

I think just for the "services" google will provide: Bandwidth, redundancy, energy to power the darn things.... it is a no-brainer to use Google Apps (or some other hosted email quite frankly). My opinion: Unless you have some strong need to keep your email locally managed (say HIPAA regulations or something similar) - you are better off having it taken ...


7

First the essentials: Read the relevant RFC:s such as RFC 5321, and make sure your mails conform to it, Don't leave out any headers such as Date: Subject: or From:, and carefully read the format details of the From: field. Just an email address is not valid anymore. Double-check that the From: address used is a valid address that you can receive mail to. ...


6

If you're having trouble configuring the standard mail programs, you can use a command-line SMTP client such as sendEmail. Along with the address, message, and other data, simply specify an SMTP server. You can use GMail along with a username and password for example. Here are the available command-line switches:


6

Postfix is a mail transfer agent (MTA). Its job is to handle the delivery of the mail: pick it up and send it to the next point on its route. Postfix is a postal worker, whose job is to take an envelope and (with help from its colleagues) carry it to the recipient. What you're asking for here is secretarial work: assembling documents to put them in the ...


6

This seems to be a common problem: http://serverfault.com/questions/255300/postfix-not-forwarding-to-forward-address http://serverfault.com/questions/288863/forward-mails-to-gmail It seems like gmail doesn't accept mails, that are forwarded back to the same account. Try to send an email to myaccount@myhostname.com from a different account, i.e. not the ...


5

If you open the Account Settings menu you should be able to add an new account using Movemail. It should be located in Account Actions under Add Other Accounts. This should then move mail from the spool folder into your inbox. Personally, I use Dovecot with Maildir format directories populated by proccmail. This allows me to read mail both locally and ...


5

OS X comes with postfix installed and configured for basic use. Its configuration files are in /etc/postfix. Documentation at postfix.org. Look in /var/log/mail.log for possible error messages. Look in /var/spool/postfix for queued messages which postfix has accepted but haven't gone out yet. My guess is that your ISP is preventing outbound messages. By ...


5

I was able to fix my problem by changing the postfix main.cf configuration to read: smtpd_relay_restrictions = permit_mynetworks permit_sasl_authenticated defer_unauth_destination instead of using smtpd_recipient_resrictions It turns out that after postfix 2.10.0, smtpd_relay_restrictions should be used instead of ...


4

Should I change my hostname on the machine to mysubdomain.mydomain.com? Normally, SPAM filter take apart of the domain name, the IP originating the spam (in some cases even the entire ip block or the ASN completly, check UCEPROTECT and Whatsmyip.com blacklist check) What other things do I have to do with the DNS to prevent my email from going into ...


4

I ran into this recently. You can change the address with the generic maps as davidgo mentioned. In /etc/postfix/main.cf Add this line smtp_generic_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/generic And then in /etc/postfix/generic Add the line for the originating email address, and the email address you want it to appear to be from root@system.fqdn ...


4

You are connecting to localhost via IPv6 (::1), but that address is not part of the "mynetworks" list. Change it to mynetworks = 127.0.0.0/8, <site IP>, [::1]/128 and it should work.


4

Desktop Ubuntus choice is the package msmtp-mta (installed as default sendmail replacement).


4

From the command line, I like to use "sendemail", which on ubuntu / debian can be installed from the command line like so: apt-get install sendemail Then you can simply tell it to use localhost (Postfix) as the MTA. Actually I just noticed that localhost:25 is the default: -s SERVER[:PORT] smtp mail relay, default is localhost:25 You then add ...


3

Postfix exim I used to use Postfix on my PC, and it worked really fine. The only downside to it is that Postfix always runs a few daemons (master, qmgr, etc), and with exim I could reduce that to a sendmail -q crontab entry. For Postfix: set relayhost for SMTP TLS, smtp_tls_security_level=encrypt for SMTP relay auth, smtp_sasl_auth_enable and ...


3

I tested Postfix 2.7.1-1 (Debian) and none of those work as you described. cat is not executed. (And to be honest, I can't imagine any possible reason why would sendmail execute an arbitrary part of its argument just because it happens to say "cat".) Sure, if you strace the sendmail process, you might see the file /etc/passwd being open()ed, but that's ...


3

According to your comments on other answers, you need to configure Postfix to use Gmail as a relay host. There are many tutorials on the Internet for this; here's a quick version. Note: With this configuration, all mail must be sent using your Gmail address as "From". Undo all your changes to master.cf. In main.cf, add these settings: relayhost = ...


3

Google apps is probably one of the nicest e-mail related services available anywhere, although it certainly lacks features needed by Exchange or Notes people. The benefits of your own server obviously relate to you having complete control over everything. A server on a home network is no place to keep important stuff running unless you're really good with ...


3

What is your ISP/web-host ? Since they are on Hotmail's block list, you will not be able to use your Hotmail account to send or receive emails while connected through your ISP. You could bring this to the attention of your ISP. They may already know about it, but maybe not. Send them a copy of the error message you got from the bounced email from ...


3

If you have a directory full of files, normally you can not just remove all files with rm Try with: find /path/to/directory -type f -exec rm {} \; Or try with: ls -1 /path/to/directory | xargs -I{} rm {} In other words you have to try to split the command in two, a part that handle the files and another that remove the files. When you have a zillion ...


3

OK, so postfix-policyd-spf-perl doesn't have a configuration file. I had to switch to the python version in order to configure the SPF settings.


3

the postfix configuration file is located in /etc/postfix/main.cf. the lines within this file which deal with tls are: smtpd_tls_CAfile = /etc/ssl/mydomain.com.root.ca.pem smtpd_tls_cert_file = /etc/ssl/certs/mydomain.com.crt smtpd_tls_key_file = /etc/ssl/private/mydomain.com.key.unencrypted none of these files require a password. note that the ...


3

This is not exactly the solution you said you were looking for, but if you have access to some other smtp server, you can use nullmailer. It is 93kB installed for karmic, and needs one or two lines of configuration.. :) Description: simple relay-only mail transport agent Nullmailer is a replacement MTA for hosts, which relay to a fixed set of ...


3

There is no way to monitor the sent mails in a clean way. You can only grep the details from the maillog of postfix. Here is an example: log='logfile of postfix' grep "status=sent" $log | \ egrep -ve 'postfix/(cleanup|pickup|master|qmgr|smtpd|local|pipe)' And also avoid the logs for dkim etc. If you need the count of mails then pipe on wc -l at the end. ...


3

Sometimes the sendmail process refuses to die even if you have removed sendmail, and that could cause such issues. In your case, just see if you have an existing sendmail process $ sudo service sendmail stop $ ps auxwww | grep sendmail If you find one, kill it and the 'No such file..' error should go.



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