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10

Batteries can and do fail for all kinds of reasons. The most likely explanation here is that your battery has developed a weak cell. This can happen even with relatively new batteries after very little use, particularly if the laptop's configuration is such that the battery is kept warm by the rest of the laptop. The only practical cure is to replace the ...


8

Your voltages are OK according to the ATX 2.2 standard, where voltage tolerances for all rails except -12 V and -5 V are ± 5%. For those two negative voltages, the tolerance is ± 10%. Here is the table for ATX voltage tolerances So these tolerances are recommended, and if your system is out of these tolerances, it doesn't automatically mean ...


4

How to check your laptop battery health in Windows 7 By: Arie Slob Windows 7 includes a new command that shows you a lot of details on its power usage & settings and helps you troubleshoot power issues (like Windows 7 waking up unexpectedly when you've put it in Sleep mode). This command also shows you some detailed information about ...


2

Theoretically, all the rails can be seen as one. More pins just allows for more current to flow to the device. 1 garden hose can supply 10 gallons per minute, 3 garden hoses can supply 30 gallons per minute. One garden hose that is larger in diameter can also move that same 30 gallons per minute but is much heavier and stiffer to move.


2

You have multiple ATA and/or SATA power connectors coming out of your PSU, no? All of their 12 volt pins come from the same rail. "How can they provide howevermany separate 12V pins?" Easy: All those pins are connected via individual wires to a common connection point back in the PSU. The reason this is done is that there is a limit on how much current ...


2

If your USB device came with a Y cable, it probably means it is a USB 2.0 device that requires more current than the 500 mA limit of a single USB 2.0 connection. The Y cable allows it to use additional current from a second USB 2.0 connection. The voltage is always 5V for each connection (that remains constant, only the current is additive). With a ...


1

Note: This is too long for a 'Comment' so I posted it as an 'Answer' even though it's really just some suggestions. After giving this some more thought, doing a little research, and with the additional information you provided, here are a few things you might try. P.S.-I agree that this is probably not a hardware/AC adapter problem especially given the ...


1

In every piece of consumer electronics I'm aware of that uses lithium-ion batteries, from phones to laptops, the safety-critical charging circuitry is either part of the device, or actually integrated into the battery pack inside the device. The external power supply, then, is still fairly "dumb", as far as battery charging goes (it may have more ...


1

Is there a specific reason why you are suspicious of the AC adapter? If it works fine when the computer is plugged in I see no reason why you would want to change it.


1

The multiple wires connecting to the same places at both ends, exist to carry a sufficient quantity of amperage with minimal voltage drop, through both the more metal carrying the electrons, and the critical connection points. Many wires to the electrons is pretty much the same to them as one big fat wire, just like the water through the hose analogy. One ...


1

A 600W PSU with an efficiency of 80% is able to supply a maximum current of about 40 Amp on the +12V output. 40 Amp on a single cable or on a single path on the mother board requires wider cable gauge than the actually used (18 wire gauge) because the actual cable probably will catch fire. Wider cables are less flexible, wider paths on the motherboard will ...


1

The basic idea with ESD protection is to lead away any static in a controlled manner. This is usually done by connecting yourself and everything else to e.g. the protective earthing in a wall outlet (that has one!) in principle via a series resistor to make the charge dissipate timely but slowly (= the basic function of a wrist wrap). To be fairly safe: ...


1

Your question is difficult to understand (Not sure what "I cant try anything" means). Most computer fans will run at 12 volts (nominally), so if you get a fan, and can find another 12 volt power supply – e.g. the kind that comes with a lot of electronic devices where the supply is built into the plug [you can use less than 12 volts; it will just spin ...


1

This sounds like a textbook case of an overloaded power supply to me. It could be high temperature but I doubt it given the unusual requirement of unplugging it from the wall to turn it back on. Pursuing the power supply (PSU) problem would be my suggestion. It's important to understand that many power supplies have multiple rails, this just means the PSU ...


1

With the exception of damage due to a severe power surge, such as that induced by a nearby lightning strike, there should be no detriment to the longevity of a modern LCD display with LED back-light if it is left on continuously. Older LCD displays with hot-cathode fluorescent back-light or cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors might benefit from being turned off, ...


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Change the mobo. No point in replacing the connector at this point since the PCB is multilayered in modern mobos meaning different pins can go to different layers.


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I've seen all kinds of strange things happen when the CMOS battery gets old. It's usually a CR2032 watch battery. Sometimes a weak battery will perform worse than if you remove the battery altogether. As a temporary measure, removing the battery and the power and booting without a battery sometimes clears things up. If that helps, then a fresh battery ...



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