Hot answers tagged

213

The runas command. runas [{/profile|/noprofile}] [/env] [/netonly] [/smartcard] [/showtrustlevels] [/trustlevel] /user:UserAccountName program Just run: runas /noprofile /user:Administrator cmd to start a command shell as a administrator


81

Microsoft released Windows NT 3.1 in 1993 as the first purely 32-bit version of Windows. Windows NT was developed as a multi-architecture operating system. Initially supported different CPU architectures, including IA-32, DEC Alpha, MIPS, and PowerPC. The original idea was to have a common code base with a custom Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) for each ...


80

I discovered elevate today which "executes a command with UAC privilege elevation. This is useful for working inside command prompts or with batch files." It's not the same as sudo, it changes the executing user to Administrator, but its syntax is a lot more straightforward to use than runas, and it can keep the current directory, enabling the use of ...


69

Follow the steps below. Start the MySQL server instance or daemon with the --skip-grant-tables option (security setting). $ mysqld --skip-grant-tables Execute these statements. $ mysql -u root mysql $mysql> UPDATE user SET Password=PASSWORD('my_password') where USER='root'; $mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES; If you face the unknown field Password error ...


62

You can use the runas command which is kind of similar, or you can check out the sudo for Windows project over at SourceForge which adds a sudo command. The difference is subtle: Let's say you have two users. Bob is a normal user and James is an administrator. If you log in as Bob and use "runas james acommand" the command is run as if it was run by James,...


44

As far as I know there are 8 base-architectures (and a number of sub-variants) of which only 2 are still supported today with Windows 10. Windows 1.0 to 3.11, Windows 95, 98 and Millenium Edition x86 (16 bit and 32 bit variants, including 8086, 80186, 80286, 80386, 80486, Pentium, Pentium Pro, Pentium II, Pentium III, P4, Core, Core Duo, Core-I and ...


34

You can also use the Script Elevation PowerToys.


32

In Process Explorer, double click the process to open its properties. Go to the Security tab. In the group listing, find BUILTIN\Administrators and look at what it says in the Flags column. Deny = Not Elevated (not admin) Owner = Elevated (is admin)


28

Opening a Windows Explorer as administrator and recreating the network shares didn't work for me. Then, I found this solution: create the share on the command prompt itself. It worked for me. net use f: \\remoteserver\subfolder Even if the drive is already mapped in windows explorer, still it worked. Note: Only use a single backslash before ...


23

.msi files can be executed with msiexec.exe, so in combination with the runas command, you could accomplish what your want: runas /user:administrator "msiexec /i <path and filename of your msi>" As a full-path to the file is recommended, it might need quotes around it and you need to escape them then with a backslash \: runas /user:administrator "...


23

Probably that is not a problem of file permissions but it's related with: Network shares being associated with sessions (i.e. different users may have a different set of network shares). Note that an user can have more that one session. How User Account Control works. Since almost all users used an administrator account in XP (as most programmers didn't ...


22

In Process Explorer you can change the columns displayed and add the "Integrity level" column: This is apparently the technical term for what is changed when you run a process with administrator privileges. If you run Process Explorer as an Administrator it will show ordinary processes as 'medium' integrity level and elevated processes as 'high'. Note ...


21

Try explicitly running the cmd shell as administrator. If that doesn't help, then try the runas command. runas /user:administrator "mklink args" Quotes around the mklink command and its args are required.


21

Windows XP 64bit and Windows Server 2003-2008R2 support the Intel Itanium IA-64 architecture.


19

If you're doing this on Windows, then in addition to the Run As command as mentioned in a couple of other answers, there are also ways to do this with the mouse. If you hold down the Shift key as you right-click on most executable files in Windows you should notice a few more advanced options. One of these is the "Run As..." option (I think it's called "Run ...


19

There is a way to do this in PowerShell: PS> Start-Process powershell -Verb runAs


18

If you are ready to switch to alternative consoles, there is ConEmu (I'm the author). One of its features - the ability to run both elevated and non-elevated tabs in the one ConEmu window. Tabs may be started with different credentials too. For user comfort, there is batch-file csudo.cmd (which may be easily adopted to bash). Read full description in ...


16

If the process is running with root-privileges, you could attach gdb to the process and call seteuid from within that process. Example: [root@user-desktop ~]# id uid=0(root) gid=0(root) groups=0(root),1(bin),2(daemon),3(sys),4(adm),6(disk),10(wheel) context=user_u:system_r:unconfined_t [root@user-desktop ~]# gdb /bin/bash $$ GNU gdb Fedora (6.8-27.el5) # ...


16

Quick method: Three steps to add sudo. 1) Open PowerShell. 2) Copy the following script (Ctrl+C) and paste it in PowerShell (Alt+Space+E+P): $script_path="$HOME\Documents\Scripts"; if (!(test-path $script_path)) {New-Item -ItemType directory $script_path} if (!(test-path $profile)) { new-item -path $profile -itemtype file -force }". $script_path\sudo.ps1"...


15

I'm not sure what the other answers and comments here are referring to. This is possible rather easily. There are two options, both which allow access to low-numbered ports without having to elevate the process to root: Option 1: Use CAP_NET_BIND_SERVICE to grant low-numbered port access to a process: With this you can grant permanent access to a specific ...


15

Windows RT, released in 2012, runs on a 32-bit ARM architecture: It is essentially an edition of Windows 8.x built for the 32-bit ARM architecture (ARMv7). […] Due to the different architecture of ARM-based devices compared to x86 devices, Windows RT has software compatibility limitations. Source: Wikipedia.


14

You don't give your distribution, but since you aren't installing as root it's probably not important. (The binaries are meant to be installed system-wide, so unless you can convince your system administrator to install the package, you'll need to compile and install to your home directory.) Essentially, Dropbox's Linux client is two parts: a daemon, ...


13

It looks like this utility - Hidden Start - will do what you wish if you use the /uac switch. Here's an example command line: hstart /UAC "notepad.exe" This will pop up the UAC dialog rather than ask for a password like runas does.


12

On Windows 7 (as well as Vista), an administrator account does not necessarily run a program with administrator priveleges. As an administrator, you have the credentials to perform administrator functions (creating/modifying user permissions being one of them, etc.). However programs are still run in a secured mode, in which they are prevented from doing ...


12

Go to the Start button; Type in Explorer; Shift Right-Click "Windows Explorer"; Run as different user. That user will also need privileges to access the file system on the local machine, and perform any futher operations you'd like to execute.


12

You need to install .net 3.5 (Even if you have .net 4+ installed) You do this through the Server Manager: Configure local server Add roles and features Click next until you get to the features section Check the .net 3.5 check box (I also checked the sub items for good measure) If you get a warning about needing to Specify an alternate path, then: ...


12

Dale Hagglund is spot on. So I'm just going to say the same thing but in a different way, with some specifics and examples. ☺ The right thing to do in the Unix and Linux worlds is: to have a small, simple, easily auditable, program that runs as the superuser and binds the listening socket; to have another small, simple, easily auditable, program ...


12

There are two primary reasons. The first reason is that, although the x86 CPUs do offer four rings of memory protection, the granularity of protection offered thereby is only at the per-segment level. That is, each segment can be set to a specific ring ("privilege level") from 0 to 3, along with other protections like write-disabled. But there are not that ...


11

type CMD, you will see CMD.exe in the list at start menu. Right click on it, select "Run as Administrator"


11

What you need to do is embed an application manifest into the EXE. Save the following as a text file called App.exe.manifest: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?> <assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0"> <trustInfo xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3"> <security> ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible