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0

On systems with 'awk' try awk 'BEGIN{ print "\a" }' was the only one to work for me.


0

If this is one time thing and you don't want to be always logging your processes, I would suggest using Microsoft Process Monitor (https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/Library/bb896645.aspx). It needs to be ran before the popular is spawned, but even after the parent process is dead it will have captured all the information you were looking for.


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So, I did figure out how to do it. Unfortunately, there don't seem to be very many readily available resources on how to use ProcMon, and my filters were actually working against me. Here's a blow-by-blow: Add a filter to include the process you want to examine On the right side of the upper bar (which is just below File, Edit, Event, etc.), there are five ...


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Simmilar to slhck's Answer, but relying on file operations instead of command invocations: MYPID=1 cat "/proc/$MYPID/comm"


9

Are there some Windows logs containing association of PID to running process By default there are no such logs. However you can enable Process Tracking Events in the Windows Security Event Log. How to Use Process Tracking Events in the Windows Security Log In Windows 2003/XP you get these events by simply enabling the Process Tracking audit policy. ...


3

The only way to see is you must have the audit enabled to track the creation of processes. From the "Local Security Policy" program (Type secpol.msc from the run screen if you are having trouble finding it) go to "Security Settings -> Local Polices -> Audit Policy" then enable the "Audit process tracking" for "Success". Once you do that go to the event ...


2

Simultaneous access: This is an extremely complex question. At a very low level, of accessing individual memory locations, the hardware takes care of it by possibly blocking one thread for a few clock cycles. At a higher level— what a programmer usually deals with— you are normally expected to use locks, semaphores, message queues, transactional memory, or ...


0

I found the answer using some slightly different search terms: expect stop Unfortunately, this means Upstart detects the first invocation of sed as the first PID Additionally the answer for a workaround is nearby, pre-start, which is exactly designed for such purpose. Didn't thought about that, even though I've read it before in the docs... ...


1

ps | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 2 will give you a list of PIDs. cut takes the second field of output separated by spaces, but before that we use tr to squeeze out multiple spaces. You can then pipe that through egrep '\d{4}\d*' to select all numbers over 1000. Then you could probably send it to xarg for killing. 1000 is easy, but for an arbitrary number ...


1

You could use this command : ps -ef | grep "your_process" | awk '{print $2}' | grep -v 'grep' | xargs kill Note : "Your_process" would be your "PID" Else : ps -ef | grep "your_process" | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill would be a worth to try


0

use lsof -p $PID and find the file descriptor (4th column) root@blah:~# lsof -p 1737 | grep "(deleted)" apache2 1737 root 6w REG 0,25 0 207401 (deleted)/var/log/apache2/other_vhosts_access.log 4th column is 6w, meaning file descriptor 6 and it was opened for writing (w). Then: gdb -p $PID p close($FD) eg: gdb -p 1737 ..... (gdb) p ...


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Store probably runs for doing automatic update check. To turn it off, go to Start -> Settings -> Privacy -> Background apps and set it to Off. More info in the article: How to Turn On or Off Background Apps in Windows 10. You might also in this case turn off automatically-applied updates by going to Settings -> Update & Security -> ...


2

I too am seeing the shortcut key delay issue in Windows 10. I believe it is caused by any Metro app sitting in the "suspended" state (as reported by Process Explorer). I have seen it caused by the Photos app, Video app, Calendar app, etc, which seem to launch randomly by themselves as he OP reports. So it seem the shortcut key delay issue a general issue ...


2

A reboot will generally fix things. If not, then the system may be loading the file in some way. Cedrick 'Nitch' Collomb's Unlocker has been known to coerce Windows in allowing a file to be deleted/renamed/etc. when the file appears to be locked. It's an older utility. It's actually worked in a surprisingly high number of cases, although system ...


0

On another computer download CCleaner copy it to USB stick. Boot to safe mode, install CCleaner and run it. Also go to Tools -> Startup disable any software you don't recognize, especially in the scheduled tasks. Disconnect PC from network. This prevents virus from accessing Internet and causing slowdowns. Reboot in standard mode. Rerun CCleaner and again ...


0

If you want to block a specific program, with a specific process name, then yes it is possible. If you want to block the "monitoring" in general, then no, it is not possible, since those information are provided by the OS's APIs.


1

I want is something that can kill ALL running processes Try the following batch file: @echo off setlocal setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion for /f "tokens=2 skip=4" %%a in ('tasklist') do ( echo taskkill /pid %%a ) endlocal Notes: Remove echo when you are happy with what it will do. You might have to run it multiple times as: The batch file itself ...


2

Andy E writes that you can use taskkill.exe. To terminate the process with process ID 1234: taskkill /pid 1234 To terminate notepad.exe: taskkill /im notepad.exe For more help: taskkill /? He adds: The /f switch would force the kill, but not using it just sends the termination signal so the application closes gracefully. He's right. I tried ...


0

It would be possible to avoid one context switch (the switch from P2 to P1) by not scheduling P2 to run while waiting for the disk operation to complete. Presumably, if you did that then P1 would resume execution slightly sooner, with a warmer TLB. You can't avoid all context switching because the system call involves a context switch (user to kernel) as ...


0

Ok, It seems one ought to choose (c) over (d) simply because (d) is untrue. When P1 goes after a while into a read stage we're talking about IO, therefore the CPU is busy. It has to first process the IO request and get to that data, so while it's doing exactly that, the scheduler runs another process so that we don't lose time - this however has nothing to ...


0

killall valgrind usually doesn't work since the actual valgrind executable has another name. This name is memcheck-amd64-linux or similar, depending amongst other things on which valgrind tool you are using. What ps reports as the process name is not the executable name though, but the first entry in the command line. This causes confusion. I've reported ...


0

Running a batch file in a continuous loop will not be able to prevent an application from starting. it can be used to see if an application is already running and then kill it. However, if the program you don't want to start starts after your "kill" call (i.e. it runs during your processing portion of your script) then there is no way to monitor this. You ...


1

For non-Metro apps in general, use Autoruns. If you don't want to just uninstall the service, disable it from Service snap in Computer Management. If you don't want to just uninstall the Metro app (literally just right click and uninstall it), remove its Lock Screen permission either from Control Panel's centralized permission list or the app configuration ...


0

This isn't a failsafe way, but you can see process hierarchy in Activity Monitor. If a process launches a child process, going to View -> All Processes, Hierarchically in the menu bar will reveal them.


1

Add -n to lsof and you remove the reverse DNS lookup from the command and reduce the run time from minutes to seconds. lsof -Pn | grep ':NumberOfPort' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9



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