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A while back I wrote a great (and perhaps somewhat ugly) batch file that does it, it requires gnuwin32's sed and cut. I wrote it 'cos I was horrified how much RAM modern browsers take up and I wanted to see quickly. I am currently trying to neaten it up but this is it as it is. So, it's saying that Chrome is using 3.4GB ...


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The general answer is: You can't, not accurately. Assuming you're asking about RAM (physical memory) and not virtual - Windows publishes two relevant counters for each process, the total working set and the private (to the process) working set. (PerfMon will show you these.) Task Manager shows the "private" and "shared" (added together these would give the ...


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Windows Sysinternals Process Explorer will do this. This is a good tool for several other jobs as well, for instance it allows you to find which process is locking a file. Also, you can browse to chrome://memory-redirect/ in chrome which will give you the stats just for chrome.


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I don't know how to do this in general, but to measure total memory usage of Chrome you can write about://memory to address bar. The Summary section shows total memory usage of all Chrome processes.


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Have you looked at PsKill? PsKill is a kill utility that can also kill processes on remote systems. Source PsKill v1.14 Windows NT/2000 does not come with a command-line 'kill' utility. You can get one in the Windows NT or Win2K Resource Kit, but the kit's utility can only terminate processes on the local computer. PsKill is a kill utility ...


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Click on the details tab to see see processes and users. Source Windows 8 Task Manager In-depth Review (Updated)


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Thank you Scott Chamberlain for suggested the RAMMap application. I downloaded it and found that i had a 4GB driver lock. After taking some time to think what could be the reason for this, i revisited my Hyper-V and found i had a virtual CRM server with a dedicated 4GB allocated to it! Been running for 4 months without me realising!!


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I'm doing something similar on my home server where I want a quick-and-dirty queuing system for quantum chemical computations. The following is a chunk from the middle of my queuing script: # If second argument passed, treat as PID to check for # completion before proceeding if [ -n "$2" ] then while [ `ps aux | grep orca | sed -r 's/[a-z0-9]+[ ...


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Process Explorer was able to find it. At first I didn't think it was working because the drag-and-drop function didn't pick it up, but I was able to find it by searching the list for suspended processes.


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When a window won't go away, it isn't always the fault of the process that own(ed) that window. It may be the fault of whatever process owns the stuff underneath the window. A process is not responsible for making its window go away (other than just calling DestroyWindow). Rather, the processes that own the windows that are supposed to be revealed are ...


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There is an excellent tookit from the systernals team wihin Microsoft called PSTools. They have essentially ported the *nix ps toolkit to windows. The particular tool within the toolkit that may be valuable to you is pskill. Pskill can kill svchost.exe and even csrss security threads, it will bluescreen the system if you do kill csrss and I only note that ...


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If app blacklisting is enough for you, so you could take a look at Process Blocker it's free. Process can be blocked by its name (with wildcard support in paths and names), as well by its CRC32. In paid version it has some additional features, such as whitelisting by process name, CRC32, and logged on username or user's group.


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Shorter Answer Don’t jump through Bash hoops to kill snappr with ps, piped through grep and then piped through awk like that. Instead try to kill it like this using pkill; no muss or fuss and it targets based on process name out of the box: sudo pkill snappr Longer Answer Not too clear with how Snapper operates on a system process level, but the issue ...


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Did you notice that you got two different PIDs in the two tries? Consider this: if you type a command like vi raven.txt, then ps ax will display a line that shows a command of vi raven.txt.  Likewise, if you type a command like grep snappr, then ps ax will display a line that shows a command of grep snappr.  And, if you pipe the output of that ps through ...


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I had the same problem and fixed it by : finding the PID with netstat -o Kill it with process xp Interesting to note that netstat can sometimes return a pid but not the corresponding executable name !


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To see the path in Solaris you need to run this command. printf "%s\n" $(readlink /proc/<PID>/path/a.out) Replace <PID> with the required process id. Example: printf "%s\n" $(readlink /proc/25014/path/a.out) Source


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I can't think of any alternatives not listed in the previous question you mentioned, except maybe AutoHotkey.. AutoHotkey provides a simple way to launch applications using the Process method. You can also set the priority when you launch your app. See here for details. Here's a simple example (from memory and untested): StartNotepadInHighPriority.ahk ...


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The new utility fatrace will do this: https://launchpad.net/fatrace/ sudo fatrace | grep '(6514)' Don't use the -p option, it means the opposite of what it means in lsof or other utilities.


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@Jesse Roper Thank you for posting "HP Support Solutions Framework Service" was preventing Couchbase default install from starting by listening on 8092 from the process System (4) just as you described. A clean install on an HP windows machine will start Couchbase but never starts listening on the admin port 8091 as it fails to obtain access to port ...



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