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Sysinternals' Process Explorer tracks which processes are using the GPU. You can enable the GPU usage column by going to the View menu, clicking "Select Columns," clicking the "Process GPU" tab, then checking "GPU usage."


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It looks like the ghost icon that appears when you drag a list item in Windows Explorer. That's the icon usually used for a Compiled HTML Help (CHM) file. Were you by any chance dragging a CHM file in Windows Explorer? If it happens again, try killing explorer.exe and see if it goes away. If you're running the Desktop Window Manager and killing explorer.exe ...


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You can identify the application by getting Process Explorer tool from Microsoft SysInternals. At the toolbar, locate and use the following tool: If you drag & drop it over unknown window, its process will become highlighted in the list. What you can do then is to right-click that process and select Check VirusTotal to see whether the image is valid ...


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Turns out tmux has powerful formatting capabilities for the list-panes command: $ tmux list-panes -F '#{pane_active} #{pane_pid}' 0 4993 0 5382 1 6189 The command above will print 1 <process_pid> for the active pane. Fromatting options are described in man tmux: pane_active 1 if active pane pane_pid ...


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If it's really a sleeping / non-running process, then it shouldn't be using any CPU while you play a game anyway, so there might not be a point to closing it (unless it were to free a ton of ram, but if it's sleeping it's ram would likely be cached to the pagefile anyway). There are some programs/services that tend to "wake up" a lot, and use CPU & ...


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As antik said, you can use netstat from within an admin command prompt. I'd suggest, though, that you use o instead of b, that way the output will be on one line for an entry and you can further filter it with find. You won't have the process name, but the process id: E.g. netstat -aon | find ":80" displays all connections using port 80 (either locally ...


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You can achieve this without downloading additional tools from an admin command shell as well. Run an admin command shell: Press start button Type "cmd" Press Ctrl + Shift + Enter Enter the command: netstat -tabn The switches mean the following: -t Displays the current connection offload state. ie. ESTABLISHED, LISTENING, TIME_WAIT -a ...


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Finally, an answer. No, it's not a rootkit. It's a bug in gnome-system-monitor. The bug is filed here: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-system-monitor/+bug/606710 If this affects you, please help out in further elucidating this bug.


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In Windows 7 you can use Resource Monitor -> Network Tab. Easiest way to open the resource monitor is: Open Task Manager (right taskbar -> Start Task Manager) Click Performance tab Click Resource Monitor button


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TCPView from SystemInternals will display "detailed listings of all TCP and UDP endpoints on your system, including the local and remote addresses and state of TCP connections." TCPView is a Windows program that will show you detailed listings of all TCP and UDP endpoints on your system, including the local and remote addresses and state of TCP ...


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Using taskkill, you can kill a process based on window title using a filter. taskkill /F /FI "WindowTitle eq Spotify" /T /F - force task kill /T - Kill child process /FI - Filter the tasks If the window title has quotes in it, you can escape the nested quotes with a backslash (\). You can use tasklist in a similar manner to search for a task based on ...


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Problem Your script is probably creating zombies because of your kill -9 commands; as suggested from jjlin answer too is never a good practice to kill abruptly some process without being forced to. From man bash we can read: Processes marked < defunct > are dead processes (so-called "zombies") that remain because their parent has not destroyed them ...


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To answer question number 1: When a process spawns child processes, the children each have their own PID. The chilrens PPID's (parent's process id) is the PID of their parent process. If the parent dies, then the child processes are orphaned. Orphaned processes are automatically picked up by the system init process which has a PID of 1.


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The program probably has the camera device open, and by forcibly killing it, you haven't allowed it to clean up properly, so now it's stuck. A few observations: It's generally not a good idea to kill a program by starting with -9 unless you know what you're doing. Just a normal kill (with no options) is fine. There should not be a need to do any killing ...


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First use top to find out the pid of the zombie process. Then run ps -elf or ps -ef to find the ppid of the zombie.


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Clear out as much from c:\windows\temp\ as you can, then kill and restart explorer.exe. (Source) This made a big difference for me. I'm not quite sure what explorer would keep wanting to do with its Temp files - but whatever it was it was driving me crazy spinning up the fan all the time. Using Process Manager you can view a graph of CPU usage per ...



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