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1

Wish I'd noticed this thread years ago. My solution was essentially the same as slhck's, but I wrote a script. I use it all the time. Posting here to share it. #!/bin/bash msg='all done' quiet=false if [ "$1" = '-q' ]; then quiet=true; shift; fi if [ $# -gt 0 ]; then msg="$*"; fi echo -ne "\x1b]0;$msg\a" if [ -x /usr/bin/zenity ]; then unset WINDOWID ...


2

Yes, you can use top, which is a console program and there is KSysGuard (if your desktop environment is KDE), which is a GUI program. If you are using GNOME - they have gnome-system-monitor, which is also GUI program. Hope that helps.


2

On the question #2: To find the name of the files being locked or written or read by a process double-click the process and go to "Handles" tab (this doesn't require any PH plugin). You are interested in rows with Type = "File". On the question #1: Just as in answer above, you need to locate the process, double-click it, navigate to "Handles" tab, ...


2

There is a Microsoft utility called process explorer that is like task manager on steroids. Clicking on a program listed shows all files being accessed, and it's search function allows you to find what program is accessing a file.


0

Process Explorer from Sysinternals is actually pretty useless when it comes to dealing with file handles (as opposed to DLL's, etc.). Use Windows Resource Monitor, click on CPU tab. Next to Associated Handles type the name of the file and you will see who has it open.


1

You may use free -h to check the mount of the RAM used by cache and buffer. Actually, it's a speed-up mechanism on Linux. If the RAM is free, it's useless. If we are able to use these free RAM to cache some data used frequently, it will speed up the whole system significantly. When some processes needs more RAM, these data will be swapped out from RAM.


1

Is there any possibility that some process using a lot of RAM is invisible from any program like top? No - there will be no invisible processes. top doesn't express 'free' as we might think of it. Sometimes the Operating System will cache memory and we would consider that memory 'free'. In short, there are no hiding processes and top is reporting things ...


1

%windir%\system32\taskkill.exe /f /t /im "winlogon.exe" is useless because it also closes the real winlogon.exe process and shutdown my PC. Use pskill from Windows Sysinternals: pskill process_id Set process_id to the correct PID for the instance of winlogon you need to kill. Usage pskill [- ] [-t] [\\computer [-u username] [-p password]] <...


1

Start Windows in Safe Mode; delete %HOMEPATH%\F6962716573755\ folder; run msconfig and make necessary changes in both Services and Startup tabs. If problems return then repeat above procedure and disable creating System Restore Points and delete all of them (still being in safe mode); a tutorial here .


-1

Microsoft makes a tool called Process Explorer which is basically a more advanced task manager. You might be able to download it and kill the process from there.


1

You have ~# uptime 23:10:00 up 26 days, 11:41, 1 user, load average: 0.39, 0.24, 0.25 Man uptime: uptime gives a one line display of the following information. The current time, how long the system has been running, how many users are currently logged on, and the system load averages for the past 1, 5, and 15 minutes.


0

I usually use this code: top -BN 2 -d 1:00 | grep '^% Cpu' | tail -n 1 | awk '{print $ 2 + $ 4 + $ 6}' I found very useful information on this topic: User terdon on supersuser.com detailed this simple code i only edited the interval "-d 1:00" between top reads.



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