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I've seen similar call traces with 3.16.5 after resume from hibernate. I've switched to ext4 and seen no issues with it. My setup used xfs roofs and file swap (not swap partition). Suspend and hibernate worked fine and resume works ok for both except for some call traces from hibernate. The system is semi-usable until moderate file ops begin. The litmus ...


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If you just go through those 4 steps your system won't boot Windows. During Windows installation process, any unused storage drivers are disabled to speed up the OS's startup. When you change the SATA mode you are using you need to change the driver that is enabled as well. For Windows Vista and 7 you had to go and edit the registry but with Windows 8 and ...


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$ ls -l /dev/md total 0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Apr 5 2014 0 -> ../md0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Apr 5 2014 1 -> ../md1 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 6 Aug 11 14:20 2 -> ../md2 As you can see, the /dev/md/0 entry is simply a symlink to /dev/md0. It seems that the mdadm software prefers the /dev/md/0 form, so I'd go with that. Both should work.


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The issue is resolved. I was advised to perform mdadm -E on all drives. It revealed that, now that the array was force-reassembled, all but one of the drives had an array-status of AAAAAA. /dev/sde had its status stuck on AA.... (two active, four inactive) and that indicated some sort of anomaly. I reassembled the drives, without --force, omitting /dev/sde ...


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1: If you don't want ZFS redundancy, you can: Use your first disk as your active pool. Schedule snapshots to allow fast rollbacks in case of human errors like rm -rf ones. Create a backup pool on your second disk Regularly update this backup pool from first pool incremental snapshots: zfs send ... | zfs receive .... The backup pool need to be created ...


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Had a similar problem with not being able to mirror my 3GB drive, tried reboots etc. The main volume was ~3TB, with 50MB of unallocated space for safety. Finally got the problem to go away by extending the main volume by 1MB. Seems like some sort of Windows bug that got cleared by doing the extend. (I intentionally leave a bit of space at the end because ...


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One of the hard-drives is defective. The reason I didn't detect it sooner is because if you have it plugged in, it manages to bog-down the whole system. Booting during bios slows down, all drives fail to be detected, etc. I'm requesting an RMA from the retailer and this should solve the problem. I'm glad it's not the motherboard haha.


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I guessed your motherboard disk interface is too new that Windows 7 installation source don't have driver to support it. Please download the Gigabyte motherboard Windows 7 Preinstall driver from web (depend on model), during Windows 7 installation when you see the disk un-allocated, click "Load Driver" select the download driver path (e.g. USB path). Once ...


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Sure, you can do partial trim with mdtrim (See --reserve option) to always leave some amount of free space untrimmed. Or you could simply create some big file with dd(1) on your encrypted FS to use up some space, which will then never be trimmed (nor used by you). I guess trimming all but ~30% of unused space will give you plenty of performance benefits, ...


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a completely-stable-overclock with the AMD SB750 SATA controller in RAID mode became partially unstable when set to AHCI mode. removing overclock remedied.


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procmon.exe to view the disk thrashing requests and you'll have a better view of the particular thread(s) and applications causing the thrashing. Things as innocuous as windows indexing, AMD Catalyst Control Center or even some background software patching can insidiously kill performance and can be ruled out before reformatting. You're well served to ask ...


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Lock symbol means the partition is in active use. You need to mdadm -f and mdadm -r the device from the active array. As far as I can see though, gparted-0.20.0 still isn't able to resize an inactive linux-raid partition. EDIT This may be related to the version of md metadata you have going. 0.90 apparently stores metadata at the end of partition, so ...


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I'd recommend splitting boot and My Documents (Microsoft now (for now) refers to My Documents as "User Files" to D:. While unlike XP there is no more right-click/properties option to move the My Documents folder it is still entirely possible. I'd recommend C:\ RAID 0/1 with SSDs and then migrate your RAID 5 as your D:. This has an added benefit of not ...


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Clicking repair should not harm any data however if the drive is failing SMART tests it's likely the drive should be replaced before the array is repaired.


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The problem here is that your RAID controller has written metadata to your hard drive which it understands, but another HDD controller doesn't. Out of necessity RAID controllers put identifying information on their member disks. This metadata is most often unique to the RAID controller's manufacturer and sometimes specific to the controller model or even ...


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Apparently at the time the array got assembled the required RAID 6 personality was not yet available, due to the module raid456 not being loaded yet. Stopping the incorrectly assembled array, loading the module, and assembling it again should help: mdadm --stop md0 modprobe raid456 mdadm --assemble --uuid=05e69c50:388afb83:1418f18e:a393cb21 The UUID is ...


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HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStorV change value from 3 to 0 and reboot. Reinstall intel drivers for RAID and will be ok!


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In my case, it was bad source disk too. Although it looked at the time like it wasn't (the /proc/mdstat progressed above 99.9% normally - but it actually failed at 99.97% which concided with when regular sync would finish). So you need to check dmesg(1) output -- it will tell you if there are any read errors. You can see details of my case in Debian bug ...



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