Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Sorry, you're out of luck. A RAID 1 operation is basically a format and full drive write operation, which is about as destructive as you can get, other than deliberately zeroing all sectors.


0

Is it possible to RAID a single SSD? It is not possible to assemble an array of multiple disks with a single disk. You can connect a single disk to a RAID controller and use the JBOD setting. That will treat it as a single disk. So you can use a single drive. It just will not be part of a RAID array.*1 What setting will need to give it? If you ...


0

RAID stands for redundant array of inexpensive/independent disks. This is a clue that a single disk will have no benefit whatsoever. However, should you decide to get a second disk an have a RAID set up, I wouldn't use a software RAID solution anyway.


2

No, you can't raid a single SSD. You need at least 2 drives for the simplest raid level - 1 or 0. There would be no real benefits from running it as a raid, tho a raid card may let you use drives with a SAS interface, or have other useful features even when used with JBOD or single disk layouts.


1

RAID level 0 just stripes the data, meaning consecutive blocks are on different disks. If one fails, then that part of the data is gone. There is no parity or recovery data stored. Theoretically if some of the files were very small, they might reside on the other 7 disks entirely, but without the file system structure data you won't know where they are. ...


2

There are several factors here. These are very big drives. There's a good reason it's generally recommended not to use RAID5 (or other parity RAIDs) with extremely large arrays: they take a long time to rebuild. The rebuild process puts a lot more stress on all remaining drives than usual, leaving a very high chance to trigger another failure. RAID 6 is ...


1

Assuming 2 identical drives, there may be no difference, but most likely the 2 separate hard drive scenario would be faster. If you think about it, this must be the case - in the case of RAID0 its possible/probable that data from both files will be written to the same disk - and assuming the disk is the bottleneck - which is a reasonable assumption - you ...


0

https://www.howtoforge.com/a-beginners-guide-to-btrfs-p2 This claims that you can change the raid level on a running array assuming you have enough free space. Make sure you're running the latest stable Linux kernel.


0

Do this: mdadm --assemble --run /dev/md0 LOOPDEVICE1 LOOPDEVICE2 The --run flag is what forces mdadm to assemble an md RAID array without all the devices. Full Example Create three files to put into RAID 5: deltik@workstation [/media/datadrive]# truncate -s 1G 1.img deltik@workstation [/media/datadrive]# truncate -s 1G 2.img deltik@workstation ...


1

You need fun_plug. When installed, log on to the NAS with telnet and rebuild via mdadm: mdadm --detail /dev/md1 --> see removed disk If the new disk is the right disk, then: mdadm --manage --add /dev/md1 /dev/sda2 Or, if it is the left disk: mdadm --manage --add /dev/md1 /dev/sdb2 This launches rebuild. To see the progress: cat /proc/mdstats ...


0

1) I guess that this depends on the RAID level you are using. So you should find out which RAID level your system is set up with. I do not know how to access it the right way, but there might be an option when booting your system. Perhaps there is another way for servers to not have to reboot the machine. 2)-5) Also depending on the RAID level and the ...


2

If there are no remapped or pending sectors, your disk does not know about any defective sectors. It’s more likely that some other component involved in disk access is damaged, like the head or whatever. That being said, I’m with the unRAID wiki on this: PLEASE completely ignore the RAW_VALUE number! Only Seagates report the raw value, which yes, does ...


0

For Windows 7 Pro, I installed an AHCI controller. I used Highpoint Rocket 620A and plugged my SATA OS hard drive into that. I booted the PC, went into BIOS and changed the SATA configuration to RAID, then saved changes and rebooted. Windows 7 booted from my HighPoint in AHCI. Once in the OS, I installed the RAID driver (it was already asking for it in by ...


0

The solution is reported on this page in the official intel support forum: https://communities.intel.com/thread/31393 To force the windows booting i have used the update system option in the temporary mode. After that i have reinstalled Intel Rapid Storage Technology (RST) and fixed the error.


0

Ok so I found that I had an additional spare disk so the command worked with 5 disks. Assuming the cmd forces -i3 as a min, I guessed I'd need an additional disk to provide the additional PEs.


3

I assume that you meant that you have two 1TB drives, and one 2TB drive. First off, you need to be fully aware that RAID is not a backup in the first place. Redundant RAID (which RAID 0 is not) gives you a chance (by no means a guarantee that you will be able to!) to handle failures within the storage system without the storage system failing completely. ...


1

You're showing your raid arrays but not the real partitions which are essential to know your setup. That said, going through the trouble and risks involved, including human error, sounds like a bad solution altogether, especially for 20GB on a 4TB drive. If I were you, I'd simply apply the initial recommendation to compress their files until the system can ...


1

I have done some work on the same stuff, 1080p60 is a total pain in the ass its about 3Gbps so you need a sata gen 3 at least to work with a hard drive and that means everything in the chain (processor, hard drive, motherboard) need to conform to the sata 3 standard. Most manufactures will say they support it but really don't. I ended up using RAM a lot ...


1

This question cannot be answered precisely without knowing what you are actually using for the RAID - whether it is motherboard RAID (which chipset?) or software RAID (Windows/hacked) or a standalone RAID card (what make/model?) However, in general disabling the RAID on a motherboard will cause all drives to show up as normal standalone drives to Windows. ...


1

Try to convert dynamic to basic using the Windows interface: Back up all volumes on the disk you want to convert from dynamic to basic. Open Computer Management (Local). In the console tree, click Computer Management (Local), click Storage, and then click Disk Management. Right-click each volume on the dynamic disk you want to convert to a basic disk, and ...


0

My solution is to boot from an Ubuntu live CD. There you can copy your data to a USB hard drive or something like that.



Top 50 recent answers are included