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It turns out the certificate being issued was for some reason the default Apache "snakeoil" certificate. I established this by: grep -i -r "SSLCertificateChainFile" /etc/apache2/ .. which returned 2 lines from file /etc/apache2/sites-available/default-ssl that referenced the snakeoil certificate. I commented these lines out and the browser now returns ...


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You might want to look at other video options in VLC settings. Try using xvideo for output first. glx might be worth trying if xvideo doesn't work, but I think that's what's causing your problem in the first place. After those two, keep cycling through the list and trying to play your video. Though since it's segfaulting, there are so many other things it ...


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It’s a command the host sends to the drive. In your regular PC, power is supplied directly from the PSU. It’s supplied as long as the PC is on, whether or not the drive is in standby. This is necessary because if the drive were to shut down completely, you would not be able to access it again.


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You need to set one of the Linux boes to act as an Access point. You can find a tutorial here. to do it in Arch Linux. or alternatively here is one to do it on the Pi. In a nutshell you need to use HostAPD to turn one of the devices into the AP so the other device connects to it as a regular client. Most WIFI devices won't work in a straight ...


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There is a software called motion that will give everything you need to stream live video. Install it using: sudo apt-get install motion It has a daemon that captures the video through the camera and stream it, so anyone on the network can watch it. EDIT: I've found this tutorial that gives you a step-by-step guide to do it.


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I've answered this question myself after hours of testing ... It's explain here


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If I understand well what I've read for the last 24 hours, I need to do routing stuff. Not unless you want to set up your system as a router. The default gateway is the IP Linux will send traffic if the destination doesn't fall in the range of any network interface's subnet masks. Typically this will be traffic destined for the "Internet." If you ...


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You can look at your file located at /etc/network/interfaces to find the default gateway. It is probably 192.168.0.1, but I can't be sure. The gateway is just your router's address. Type "cat /etc/network/interfaces" to see the info. Edit with root privileges (sudo) if you want to change it. Try This: auto lo iface lo inet loopback auto eth0 iface ...


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I feel your pain! Thankfully I managed to get half a script done so hopefully you can or others can use it. #!/bin/sh /etc/rc.common # Kismet server init script # Copyright (C) 2015 Springboard Research Limited START=97 STOP=98 start() { echo "checking monitor interface" if [iw dev mon0 info | grep -q "Interface"]; then ...


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I finally figured it out. Turns out fat32 does allow some Operating Systems to run however, most linux distros run better on the EXT2, or EXT3 system better. I forgot about that and that's what was preventing it to work. I had to use the pi tool to set it up and finally got some treading with that. Anyway, I appreciate the help!


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What you want to do is actually install Raspbian onto the Raspberry Pi if you have not already done so. You can then download Putty which is a windows based Terminal. It lets you connect to a remote Linux system and give commands to it. Using Putty you can actually send files from a Windows system to a Linux system (which Raspbian is). The Terminal command ...


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Essentially you can do this but as stated earlier: you will require a host machine. In other words: you must create a connection between your Raspberry Pi and some host system. Then you will need to have your Raspberry Pi tunnel all its internet traffic through the host system. This article will provide you with a step-by-step guide on how to set up a Linux ...


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In order for your internet traffic to appear to come from another IP address, you will need to have another IP address to come from. As you surmised, a VPN service provides this. Your internet traffic is tunnelled over a VPN to a third party, then goes to the internet from that third party. And the traffic between you and the third party is encrypted. ...


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Instead of xinit use startx. Open rc.local sudo nano /etc/rc.local and use su -l pi -c startx /home/pi/startmidori.sh This solution works for me if i us the PiTFT, but if i connect a display via HDMI it start's only the GUI/Desktop but not Midori.


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It would be likely that sudo is causing the problem. To check, you can run an X application (e.g. xeyes) without sudo. If this works, you can run your python script by adding the xauth cookie to root: dave@raspberrypi$ xauth list raspberrypi/unix:10 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 1e656e1......2d6d5a dave@raspberrypi$ sudo su # paste in the output from 'xauth ...


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Only your local network knows that your pi is on 192.168.0.10, as that is a local IP. Your public IP, as seen from the rest of the world, is whatever your router gets from your ISP. You can check what this IP is by going to whatismyip.com. You then need to tell namecheap.com that your website is on the returned public IP (Which from now on, we'll assume is ...


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You need to forward port 80 to the Raspberry Pi at the router. This tells the router that any client connecting to 162.255.119.254:80 (the default http port) should be redirected to the corresponding port on 192.168.0.10 (in this case, 8001). Depending on the brand of your router, the option to forward ports may be listed as "Forwarding", "Virtual Servers", ...


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The SoC device used on the Pi does not have builtin support for ethernet so the ethernet functionality on the Pi is provided by a USB-ethernet chip, sharing the same USB bus as any other USB peripheral you might have connected to it (including any USB flash drives). This is probably the main reason why you see abysmal performance. Solution? Sadly there is ...


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Based on the details provided in the question, here are some factors that could affect the local transfer rate: The resources on the Raspberry Pi The read speed of the hard drive connected via USB (read speed should typically be high but not sure if drive is faulty) The USB drivers on the Raspberry Pi The USB connecter/external case that connects the hard ...


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As already mentioned, you can use a software like tmux or screen to start a shell and keep it running detached, but you could also use the nohup cmd to start your processes and keep them running even without any open session on the rasp.


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You can use screen or tmux for that. I would prefer tmux. What tmux does is basically create different tmux sessions which keep on running even if you close your ssh session. When you reconnect later, you can re-open that session and you will see that everything is running fine. This is a standard practice while using ssh. For an even better interface ...


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Yes, I finally did it, bloody hell! Well, if someone will encounter with similar problems, here's a solution: Download DHCP Server for Windows. It is a 100kB download available here. Go to the IPv4 properties page of the Ethernet adapter and set a fixed IP address, say 192.168.2.1 Run the DHCP Server Wizard (downloaded above) Select the Ethernet adapter ...


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The file located inside the /home/myusername/ is the one which will be used every time you start a bash session. The file located in /etc/skel/ will be used as a template to create .bashrc files for any new users that are created on the system.


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/etc/skel is the template directory that will be used to create a new home directory when a user is added. /home/user/.bashrc is your personal copy, and is the one you should change for your user to have those effects.



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