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0

Took me a while but I figured out that I had to add a line to my firewall rules to open port: 3389. Here's how: In a terminal type: sudo nano /etc/iptables.firewall.rules Add the following line: -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 3389 -j ACCEPT Save using CTRL-W


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The router with external IP ( 87.245.x.x) must be in 10.0.0.x sub-net. RaspberryPi must have defualt gw configured with 10.0.0.x gateway Try to acces it ( http[s]://87.245.x.x) outside of your LAN. With your PC probably not work because port-forwarding/triggering is only listening for WAN packets


4

In an IP network a computer is only able to directly talk to another computer or device on its own subnet. That subnet is defined by the netmask. So your subnet for the IP address 192.248.10.71, which has a netmask of 255.255.255.0, has a range of 192.248.10.0 to 192.248.10.255. So the only computers the Pi can talk to have to have an IP address in that ...


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On your RPI install Webmin, then access your boxes via web interface: https:yourPI:10000 More about webmin: http://www.webmin.com/


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Fixed it by running: root# fsck /dev/sdb2 -a -f fsck from util-linux 2.25.2 /dev/sdb2: Inodes that were part of a corrupted orphan linked list found. /dev/sdb2: UNEXPECTED INCONSISTENCY; RUN fsck MANUALLY. (i.e., without -a or -p options) root# fsck /dev/sdb2 -f fsck from util-linux 2.25.2 e2fsck 1.42.12 (29-Aug-2014) Pass 1: Checking inodes, ...


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You have to stop the transmission-daemon before editing the settings.json file, because on every shutdown of the program it saves the settings. So shutting it down after editing the settings file will remove everything you edited.


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The easiest, most bone-head simple way to make a connection for what you're thinking is to sudo apt-get install gitso on both Linux machines. Read the documentation if you must, otherwise set one to provide support and the other to get help You can bootstrap your way in by ssh -X <user>@ip.ad.re.ss and then execute gitso. You could make it painless ...


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There appears to be a bug in the Realtek 8192cu Linux driver. The same configuration works if a different adapter is used on one of the machines.


2

As you mentioned you have a few items confused. You mentioned you configured the Pi as an Access Point from other tutorials so assuming it is set up correctly, we'll start with validating that setup and move on to the web server. On the Pi we want to ensure a web server is running. Having enable an 802.11 Access Point does not start a web server. This ...


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As It is behind your router and I suppose you use NAT, the only way you can do such a thing is to have a domain and a dns bind with you ip address (ie to you router) and forward the ssh traffic to your raspberry :)


0

Why don't you just create an alias in Terminal to connect you via SSH automatically? alias pi="ssh root@10.0.0.X" So in future, just type in 'pi' in terminal and it will send the command.


3

A few things to consider.. Does that splitter duplicate control lines other than Tx, Rx and GND? If so, I would physically disconnect those lines on the Serial-to-USB side. These lines may be used for flow control. Even Tx pin is not needed for Raspberry Pi side so you may disconnect it as well. Just RX-GND seem to be enough for Pi. The RS-232 port on ...


1

I solved it! Apparently, the windows built-in partitioner sucks at what it was designed to do. I would recommend if you are stumbling onto this question to use AOMEI Partition Assistant or EaseUS Partition Master, never use the windows paritioner.


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# apt-get install sysv-rc-conf then # sysv-rc-conf Then just look for mysql and uncheck all runlevels. You can also disable other run time scripts, but be careful with ones you don't know about as many are needed for a properly functioning system.


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According to the MySQL 5.0 Reference Manual you may find an init.d script responsible for starting the service at boot. If that's the case, consider the following: Determine if you have an init.d script: sudo ls -al /etc/init.d/*sql* Take note of the name, according to the docs it should be mysql.server, it may also be symlinked as mysql. Disable via ...


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I found out what the problem was. And it answered 2 problems I had. I am using this to count the bytes a user uses and then forward it to its destination. The problem was the usage was not adding up along with the question above. I had forgotten to include a rule for downloads for each rule for uploads. Adding these rules, 277K 330M wifi.usb all -- * ...


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Please give some details, maybe a screenshot with the partition configuration/size. Anyway, to bypass eventual limitations you could use a more relible partitioning program. Try this one .


1

you can use disk management to extend system partition, but you can only extend partition when there is unallocated space contiguous behind to the system partition, otherwise, the extend volume will gray out and you aren't allowed to extend partition. in this situation, i suggest use AOMEI Partition Assistant to extend partition if you can't create any ...


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I'm assuming here that Raspbian is similar to regular Debian GNU/Linux, and that you are using dependency based booting (not systemd; though this can probably be adapted for systemd as well). That is, that your environment is similar to Debian Wheezy (which is the current stable release at the time of writing this answer). During the boot process, ...


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If you have an iPhone you could install the Fing Network Scanner app. It has worked well for me, and allows me to easily see all the devices that are running on my local network. There is also an Android app, but I have not used it.


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This was fixed by using an other SSH client. My current software wasn't able to connect anymore. Changing SSH client when you encounter such error should solve the problem.


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Is the process a zombie or something unusual that's not kill-able? Check with ps aux | grep raspi looking at the STAT column (pipeing to less may help, then search within it for "raspi"). (See man ps for the different "PROCESS STATE CODES")


0

Had to do this recently for a Hackathon, so I figured I would contribute what we ended up doing. Set up autologin as root on tty1 (the main terminal where the keyboard device is dumping its input). The Arch Linux wiki entry has good instructions. Reboot to get it to log in. Copy the source of a small program known as 'ttyEcho'. One copy can be found here, ...


2

This answer on the Raspberry Pi Stack Exchange site seems to perfectly nail it. The key is all Raspberry Pi’s have a MAC address that begins with B8:27:EB so you can use nmap to scan the network and filter for that MAC address like this: sudo nmap -sP 192.168.1.0/24 | awk '/^Nmap/{ip=$NF}/B8:27:EB/{print ip}' Of course the 192.168.1.0/24 should be changed ...


1

Assuming your on linux, you can try nmap. You can try something like : $ nmap 192.168.1.0/24 Nmap scan report for pi (192.168.1.10) Host is up (0.023s latency). Not shown: 999 closed ports PORT STATE SERVICE 22/tcp open ssh This will list all the host on the network 192.168.1.0/24, and list the tcp ports open on each of them. Typically, ...



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