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95

First, make sure that you have hfsprogs installed. Example installation command: sudo apt-get install hfsprogs Next, mount or remount the HFS+ drive; commands need to be as follows: sudo mount -t hfsplus -o force,rw /dev/sdx# /media/mntpoint or sudo mount -t hfsplus -o remount,force,rw /dev/sdx# /mount/point Finally, if the drive was improperly ...


43

You need to turn off the journaling if you want to write to it from Ubuntu. Ubuntu only has support for writing to non-journaled HFS+ volumes. On your Mac: Open Disk Utility under Applications -> Utilities Select the volume to disable journaling on. Choose Disable Journaling from the File menu. (On later Mac OS versions you'll have to hold down the ...


17

You can enable writing to HFS+ in Linux even if you didn't disable journaling. In addition to hfsplus which you already have, you need to have hfsprogs installed: sudo apt-get install hfsprogs Then, use the -o force option: sudo mount -o force /dev/sdX /your/mount/point If the drive has been mounted automatically (as it should be on a desktop system ...


10

Have you tried to match permissions? By default, Mac OS X formats volumes in journaled HFS+ volumes. Journaling is a feature that improves data reliability, and unfortunately it makes HFS drives read-only in Linux. To disable journaling, just boot into OS X and fire up Disk Utility. Click on your HFS partition, hold the Option key, and click File in the ...


8

I would use NTFS instead. It can easily be read/written to by Linux, Windows and OS X (among others). Considering the intended use and the fact that it is an external drive, I see no reason why you should go through the hassle that using ext4 will be. If this were your primary hard drive, perhaps the advantages of ext4 (briefly, less drive fragmentation ...


5

The superuser will always be able to read any file. And will be able to change owner or permissions of any file, regardless of the original owner. So yes, you could access those files using the superuser, and you could change permissions or owner to be able to acces them with your own regular user. This is indeed very useful, for example, to make backups, ...


4

Paragon software offers ExtFS for Windows 2.0 for free for personal use. It allows to read and write ext2 ext3 and ext4 from all Windows OS http://www.paragon-software.com/home/extfs-windows/ It appears to be somewhat similar to Linux Reader from Diskinternals, that can mount all ext, HFS and ReiserFS too, but read-only. ...


3

The main problem I can think of is that that command will set the execute bit on all files, even those that aren’t executable.  So, if you have a file called foo, and someday you want to do cat foo or print foo and you accidentally type just foo, the shell will try to execute foo; i.e., interpret it as a shell script.  This will probably just explode in your ...


3

Copy pasted from http://www.blu-ray.com/faq/: How fast can you read/write data on a Blu-ray disc? According to the Blu-ray Disc specification, 1x speed is defined as 36Mbps. However, as BD-ROM movies will require a 54Mbps data transfer rate the minimum speed we're expecting to see is 2x (72Mbps). Blu-ray also has the potential for much higher speeds, as a ...


3

You're using an editor that, when saving, replaces the file instead of changing its contents. Give yourself permissions for the parent folder and you'll be able to save, or use another editor.


2

Your SSD is almost certainly connected via SATA. SATA uses the same wires for reading as for wrting, which means the reads and writes have to be interleaved in time.


1

If you want to SOME of the features of EXT4, you can use them using tune2fs to add the features to an EXT3 partition. The latest Ext2FSD release notes should list which features you can enable. You may want to read the tune2fs man page, there are some hints on how to handle writing to the filesystem in the header that can be beneficial to set for a backup ...


1

The primary point to keep in mind is the amount of data that is getting written and deleted per unit time. If that data is small, its not going to be an issue. If that data is large, it will be. There is nothing that Mavricks (or any other OS for that matter) can really do about this without lying to you about what is one the disk (i.e. if you used a ...


1

As I understand it, SSD drives have firmware drivers which perform load leveling algorithms. In fact, there really isn't any defragmentation on an SSD drive, like Norton Utilities used to provide. From OS theory 101, there is often a background task which is used to defragment disk drives, especially on xNIX systems; I'd assume that on a Mavericks SSD ...


1

There is a lot of factors influencing speed of file transfers. I recommend you read the following wiki articles to get a better understand of what is happening when a file is transfered from one device across you computers busses / (in-put/out-put) hardware to an other device. This answer is mostly theoretical. The explanation and examples are there to help ...


1

"The mechanical components take much longer to do there job, which is where even on the most high end mechanical disks you will still only transfer at between 15mb/s - 30mb/s." Above statement is incorrect! Modern desktop/laptop hard drives have a sustained sequential transfer rate above 100MB/s (Megabytes per second). Even 5400RPM drives now days have a ...


1

ntfs is the kernel read-only driver. ntfs-3g is the FUSE read/write driver.



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