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23

I was very skeptical, having 6GB of ram on my 8730w laptop running 64bit Windows 7 RC. But, since SD cards is so cheap now, I went out and bought a Panasonic Class 10 (22MB/s) 8GB SD card and put it into my laptop and enabled ReadyBoost. To my surprise, it was quite a noticeable performance gain. One must understand though, that it's a cache kind of ...


17

There is a freeware program called Soluto which is claimed to speed up Windows boot time. It works for Windows 7. I haven't experienced it but I think it is worth trying in your case.


11

One major difference is that ReadyBoost is limited to USB 2.0 bandwidth (unless your computer has the ultra-rare and extremely bleeding edge USB 3.0), whereas the hard drive is on the much, much faster SATA interface. Thus, putting fast flash memory on SATA alone is enough of a win to say definitively that it will be faster. ReadyBoost is also designed ...


11

Regarding page files, Mark Russinovich (pretty much the expert on Windows in everyway) wrote an article that can be found here: http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2008/11/17/3155406.aspx. He finds that turning the pagefile off is a huge mistake. The key quote is probably: Perhaps one of the most commonly asked questions related to ...


9

The most comprehensive information might be obtained using the built-in Performance Counters (which are probably being accessed by 3rd party tools like RBMon). Simply launch the Performance Monitor (accessible via Management in the Control Panel or simply by typing "Performance" in the search box in Start Menu, it should then be among the results) and add ...


9

Disable ReadyBoost. Make your SSD your primary / boot drive, and / or make sure your pagefile is on it. ReadyBoost is just a secondary buffer for stuff - if your pagefile is fast enough you don't need to use ReadyBoost. Even if you can't make the SSD your boot drive, you can still tell Windows to use the SSD for your page file. Either way it eliminates the ...


8

Yes, it works really well, but you have to get a 'fast enough' storage for this. It helps me a lot in my notebook. And it's good since I don't have to use a 7200 RPM HDD, nor waste money on SSD or something like this. I'm not made from money and a fast enough pendrive is dirt cheap now. Try it out with a friend's pendrive. (I'm running Windows 7 ...


8

Yes, ReadyBoost will help. But I think an 8 GB card will likely be overkill - with ReadyBoost, more is not always better. ReadyBoost works as an optimization for your existing RAM and page file. You're not storing or caching more information anywhere, you're putting the same information in a faster location. Your page file rarely grows as large as ...


8

ReadyBoost is designed to take advantage of the almost non-existant latency of most flash drives to get small amounts of data into memory quickly. A modern hard drive will still easily out transfer most usb flash drives (50-100MB/s vs. 10-20MB/s) after just a few hundred milliseconds on average. There really isn't a good way to enable your suggested ...


6

I have found that the guaranteed mark of speed are drives that claim "readyboost enabled". The readyboost feature of Vista requires high speed, so if the drive has that then if should be fast. The minimum specs for a readyboost enabled drive are: (According to the Wikipeda page on readyboost) For a device to be compatible and useful it must conform ...


6

Looks like this is a security feature, so I don't know if it can be bypassed: The driver encrypts each block it writes using Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption with a randomly generated per-boot session key in order to guarantee the privacy of the data in the cache if the device is removed from the system. ...


6

Have you tried running "Autoruns"? You could start with entries under "Logon". This utility, which has the most comprehensive knowledge of auto-starting locations of any startup monitor, shows you what programs are configured to run during system bootup or login, and shows you the entries in the order Windows processes them. These programs ...


6

ReadyBoost is not virtual memory, it is a harddisk drive cache. Windows would rather use your RAM as a cache, but if that's low, solid-state memory is a decent second option. Reading and writing small files in solid-state memory is faster than on a harddisk drive. Windows copies regularly used files to the ReadyBoost drive so it can load them faster in ...


6

I don't know that I agree with the statement: "ReadyBoost focus is reducing RAM usage, instead of increasing hard drive access times." It is primarily used for caching files, so they do not have to be read from the hard disk again, which is slower. Unless you have an SSD drive, I believe you would probably notice the difference. I saw a big difference, ...


5

ReadyBoost has the best effect on older systems that are on the low end of what the operating system supports. Newer systems generally don't see a huge performance boost.


5

I've also been doing a little research on the same topic and this is what I came up with. This is a quote from windows.microsoft.com Here are some tips on what to look for when selecting a USB flash drive or flash memory card to use with ReadyBoost: The minimum amount of available space recommended for ReadyBoost to effectively speed up your ...


5

ReadyBoost is not designed for this type of usage. ReadyBoost is designed for low-memory machines, which your machine is not. Your computer simply has to much memory and cache to gain any improvements from ReadyBoost. ReadyBoost provides the most significant performance improvement under the following circumstances: The computer has a slow hard disk ...


5

Readyboost should have no problem allowing 32GB of space on Windows 7, so long as you have formatted the drive using NTFS or exFAT. If you have formatted it as FAT32, though, you'll be limited to 4 GB. Note that you are unlikely to see significant performance gains on modern hardware, mind you. You'd be better off going for an SSD. Still, Readyboost may ...


5

ReadyBoost is a reading file cache, it is not an extension of virtual memory, that is based on the fact Flash memory has effectively zero seek time to cache small files (because Flash memory is also slower at sustained write that you HDD). What ReadyBoost also does is provide more space for the Windows Super Fetch function, if you don't have any ReadyBoost ...


5

It can help but only if you have minimal RAM. Benchmark tests by various sources have been done to show its effect: Toms Hardware Windows Vista's SuperFetch and ReadyBoost Analyzed As you can see, if you have 512 MB RAM, ReadyBoost can really help. If you have 2 GB or more it probably will go un-noticed. For you with 1 GB ReadyBoost would ...


5

Yes, it does. You'll see a significant increase in performance whenever the system is I/O bound. Disk-heavy applications like Visual Studio and Apache OpenOffice start up noticeably faster compared to without ReadyBoost—and this is on a system with 8 GB of physical memory! The most obvious gain in performance I've noticed is when the system resumes ...


5

On Windows 7 you CAN use an internal SSD drive for ReadyBoost. Example scenario where it makes "some" sense: You have an existing Windows 7 desktop that could use a performance boost, but you don't have time to reinstall/migrate the boot drive to an SSD. Install a cheap SSD, and configure it for ReadyBoost (just right click on the drive the same as you ...


5

I managed to set up a full 120 GB SSD disk to use ReadyBoost by creating four partitions and enabling ReadyBoost on them all. ReadyBoost for Windows 7 allows only max 32 GB per partition but one disk can still be partitioned more times. Total maximum will be 256 GB with 8 partitions (32 GB each).


5

No problem with exFAT but whether you can use it for Readyboost really depends on the read/write speed of the card. The device must be capable of 2.5 MB/s read speeds for 4 KB random reads spread uniformly across the entire device, and 1.75 MB/s write speeds for 512 KB random writes spread uniformly across the device. Windows 7 automatically ...


4

There is speed requirement but any newer SD card should be fast enough. However, I would go for fastest one that you can find in order to maximize effect.


4

If you're using Readyboost on a Studio 15, there seriously is no point in checking out Per-GB costs because your pagefile won't be that big (maybe 3 or 4 GB at its peak if you're doing 3D animation while playing Halo at the same time with Firefox open in the background just in case), so you only need to consider 4GB cards anyway. And 4GB cards are about $14 ...


4

First, you should know that higher class SD cards will not be appropriate if you want to use them for ReadyBoost because higher classes tend to compromise random access times for better sequential reads and writes which are great for digital photography and large file transfer but useless for ReadyBoost. What you are looking for is better random access times ...


4

I tried using a fast (class 10) 8GB SD card for ReadyBoost on my Win 7 x64 laptop. It booted very slightly faster, but overall I didn't feel it had much effect. I found the presence of a drive letter that I couldn't use for anything sort of annoying, so I stopped using it and don't miss it. I had a similar experience with Vista's ReadyBoost and a USB drive. ...


4

Theoretically, for ReadyBoost to work as it should, you should probably stick with NTFS. Really, NTFS is the way to go with any partition that works with Windows as long as you don't need cross-platform compatibility. NTFS support on Linux and MacOS is shaky and I wouldn't depend on it for mission-critical applications. You shouldn't just 'pull-out' the SD ...



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