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12

Try Audacity, multiplatform, nice and powerful, does MP3 export via plugin. http://audacity.sourceforge.net/


10

If I gather a bunch of songs on a playlist for sides a/b of the tape, how can I ensure that the volume for all songs is the same as it plays on the tape? Turn on the 'Sound Check' feature of iTunes. This will auto-level your music. I was thinking of finding an old compact casette recorder and putting the single line sterio output of my Mac to the ...


8

XBMC (the software formerly known as Xbox Media Center) can do most of your requirements except for the recording. MediaPortal is it's bigger and slightly wonkier relative, it can do recording but is in my opinion a bit trickier to set up.


8

You are not going to be able to use your hdmi port because it is output only. And you cannot import HD video into USB without spending a lot of money on some additional hardware. There is no software only solution to your project. But there is a very cheap piece of hardware you can purchase online if you can live without the High Def. and be ok with regular ...


7

Try to execute the following in a terminal: say -o ~/Desktop/say.aiff "Hello. I'm a Mac" That will save the spoken text "Hello. I'm a Mac" to ~/Desktop/say.aiff. See the manpage of say (execute man say in a terminal) for more information and other file formats. You can also easily convert the .aiff-File to an mp3 with iTunes or a console based encoder ...


7

You can use SoX package. rec recorded_track.wav 00:05 Records for 5 minutes. More documentation on SoX manpage.


7

Media Poral got plugins, one where it's possible to start other apps, like browser, emulator/games etc. Can do (i think all) your reqeirments and maybe more. Can also handle timeshifting (right word?) and pause the tv-program you are watching etc. As grapefrukt mentiond it's not trivial to setup, but probably what you are looking for.


6

The problem is not really the software but the hardware. Assuming you solved this (Audio Out of the tape deck in the Line In port of a sound card?), Audacity is a great alternative to Adobe Audition. Audacity is of course not restricted to digitizing audio cassettes.


6

The problem is in the VirtualBox distribution itself, which now lacks the required modules. If you took a look in the module VBoxHeadless.cpp, you would see that for this to function, the following conditions must be fulfilled : VBOX_FFMPEG must be defined The VBoxFFmpegFB shared library must be available with entry-point VBoxRegisterFFmpegFB In the ...


5

From the command line: $ say -o hello.aiff 'hello world' $ say -o output.aiff -f input.txt


5

This thread in Audacity's forum shows many ways of doing it, but I am using their last suggestion: It's Freecorder, a browser plugin, that records the Windows audio output.


5

Have you tried the Mac version of Camtasia? Personally I prefer ScreenFlow.


5

What I did was first download the official autoit installer and then enter the installation directory. There should be a folder named Extras. Inside this folder there should be another folder named Au3Record. This is the directory of the autoit recorder.


4

Sequential read/write performance on any modern hard disk is fast enough to record uncompressed high quality audio without problems. A 5400 RPM will do drive and it will generate less heat, produce less noise and draw less power. The main advantage of higher spindle speed drives is in random access. If you work on one song, or if you are not doing a dozen ...


4

Assuming you run some form of Windows and you don't actually need near real time recording then I think what you want is TimerSnapper. http://www.timesnapper.com/ It takes screenshots of your desktop every few seconds and stores them. It's really intended for use to help developers keep track of what they worked on during the day. I believe it has a user ...


4

You might be able to use something like Adobe Audition to do frequency space editing and remove the beep. This lets you edit at the frequency level so you could mute just the part of the spectrum that the beep is on. Are you using the built-in microphone jack? If so, I suspect that the beep is coming from your hard drive and a poorly designed motherboard ...


4

With Audacity, you will be able to achieve close to everything you want to achieve provided you understand how to work audio. It is important you need to be able to visualize sound in terms of identifying the different frequencies. Frequencies are like the audio equivalent of an image's histogram, and to achieve "HDR" audio, you will need to blend in ...


4

Quicktime X can do this by default on Snow Leopard.


4

MediaPortal has been my best choice so far, and has worked well for most all of my uses. Unlike some of the other responses, I found it fairly easily to set up and almost negligible to maintain. I primarily use it to watch recorded or downloaded TV shows and movies, and it works like a charm.


4

I've used Tversity. I don't think it allows TV recording, but it excels at transcoding on-the-fly and streaming to UPnP AV/DLNA devices. Then there's XBMC, and Boxee (an XBMC fork). Look through this Lifehacker article for a roundup of media centre options. There's a separate roundup of DVR applications for your TV-watching needs, with some apps featuring ...


4

What you want is Total Recorder by High Criteria. I've been using it for years and have been very happy with it. Good support as well. I should also mention that in addition to being run interactively (in a window), it can be launched via the command line as well. I use it to record some weekly radio shows that I'm rarely home for and use the Task Scheduler ...


4

The HDMI ports on laptops is linked to the graphics card and is strictly video OUTPUT, designed to put your display out to a TV, Projector or other display device. If you want to record TV, you need some sort of tuner card which simply features a HDMI port. After doing some digging, this is the only one I could find, and it isn't cheap. HDMI has been out ...


4

I seriously would recommend you get HDDs as a backup: Reasons: They are cheaper You can keep your data always up to date You can plug them in anywere Faster Backup If you check HDD prices today, they are probably quite high, this is still due to the flooding in Thailand, which made the prices for HDDs explode - doubled prices!


3

I used Process Monitor to locate temp files. Search for nbrplay.exe, operations WriteFile Temp files are located in %TEMP% in folder named something like 29784192 Video is in DAT SOund is in WAV I don't know how to open DAT file though.


3

Linux command line: linphone includes a scriptable linphonec command-line version. Starting linphonec with the --pipe option will create a socket in /tmp that one can write to and read from. It fulfills all your requirements and I've tested (for my own uses) all of them successfully: Calling via SIP, transmitting DTMF sequences, recording a call to file, ...


3

I'd use Audacity for this. It's a totally free audio recorder and editor. You can export into any format, but don't forget to fetch the "mp3 export plugin".


3

I love and swear by audacity. I use it all the time for recording sound output. It should work for you, too.


3

Maybe this, not free http://www.sound-snooper.com/en/features.php . Audacity says it does sound activated recording, its free http://audacity.sourceforge.net/


3

There's certainly a 30 second skip on both Vista Media Center and Windows 7 Media Center -- I use it every day to skip commercials! Just press the chapter forward key during playback and that will skip 30 sec.



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