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24

It strongly depends on how you call your program with sudo or su. E.g. on the system on which I am in this moment: .bashrc COMMAND $HOME $USER Env. $PATH 1. sudo -i (root) root root [1] 2. sudo -s (USER) root USER /home/${USER}/bin:[1] 3. sudo /bin/bash (USER) root USER ...


19

If you have full sudo access, you can become root using sudo su -, so the security point is moot. Indeed, there is a way to discern the difference between a program ran as root and a program ran under sudo - using getuid vs geteuid - but this is a contrived trick. Why would a patch system do that?


5

There are a few differences if you are getting a root shell, as pointed out by @Hastur. If you are not getting a root shell, then there are more differences. The support member may have experience trying to do things like sudo patch -p0 < /root/patch.file where patch is run as root, but < (piping from a file) is not.


4

If you've got a LiveCD for your OS you can boot to that and mv it back to its original location


3

Try this: LD_LIBRARY_PATH="/old_lib64" mv /old_lib64 /lib64 If you need a terminal, hold ctrl + alt + shift and press 1


3

your subnet and your range are in different networks. the range definition must be in the same network the subnet defines. Also, set your subnet address to .0, not 1. .1 is a host, .0 is a network. finally, every option must end with a semicolon (;) ... subnet 192.168.56.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 { range dynamic bootp 192.168.56.25 192.168.56.200; ...


3

The wrong TZ is probably set via .profile, .bash_profile or bashrc, thus overriding the machine-wide TZ setting in /etc/timezone


3

On unix, the timezone for an individual process can be set by setting the environment variable TZ. Each process can have a different value for TZ and thus show a different timezone. If TZ isn't set, there's a system-wide default. In your second example, you ran ssh with specifying a command to run on the remote server. So ssh set up an ordinary interactive ...


3

You would need some sort of Out of band management system to do this properly. This would give you remote access over the network even without an OS or hard disk. Most computers in a data center have this sort of thing, but you will need to talk to the provider or whomever set up the boxes initially to get the details on how to use it.


2

If your OS does not clean /tmp automatically, install tmpreaper or tmpwatch. They can be set to run as cronjobs so the cleaning is automatic. They are easily configured to follow your preferences for what to keep, what to clean, and when to clean it. On a debian-like system, run apt-get install tmpreaper. The configuration file is typically ...


2

There are some generally-adhered-to stardards for linux filesystems: Here is a generic Linux fs overview Here is the RedHat-specific Filesystem Hierarchy Standard Based on these, creating an /opt/production/ would be a good possibility. However, many organizations roll their own so yes, you could create a /data without issue. The main consideration is ...


2

I use echo $XDG_CURRENT_DESKTOP Not sure if it's a 100% working solution, but proved to be good enough so far.


2

This is also a good command: pgrep -l "gnome|kde|mate|cinnamon|lx|xfce|jwm"


2

Try using the -t flag to see how the filename is stored, then specify the same name at the end of your extraction tar command, including any path/directories. As in tar --extract --file=some.tar exactfilename


2

The Apache API changed from 2.2 to 2.4, unixd_config was renamed ap_unixd_config (see Api changes from 2.2 to 2.4). You need a php module version that is compatible with Apache 2.4 or stay with Apache 2.2.


2

You probably have the command export $PATH (or something like it) in one of your initialization files (.profile, .bashrc, etc.)  Find it and change it, perhaps to export PATH (note: no $) or comment it out and see if anything breaks.


1

Why are you installing one item at a time via a script? No need to do this when you can just place all items in one line like this: yum -y install libstdc++.i686 ibibcm.x86_64 librdmacm.x86_64 ibsim.x86_64 ibutils.x86_64 libcxgb3.x86_64 libibmad.x86_64 libipathverbs.x86_64 Now that said, I don’t believe all of the yum -y install directives are running ...


1

if your CPU doesnt support virtualization, then thats just it, you cant VIRTUALIZE it. But as you said, you can install it beside your win7 installation. i would run the live cd and mess around before installing it, thats one way you can see if any errors occur.


1

Dualbooting seems the best option to use linux on your pc considering that your computer only has 2 gb of RAM and does not support virtualization. If you want to learn about RedHat linux you can use Centos and Fedora. RedHat Enterprise Linux 7 introduced systemd while Fedora started using systemd long before RHEL did. Centos 7 is equivalent to RHEL7.


1

You can use the HAL command lshal to get a list of all the hardware. You might need to install it and its dependencies first. yum -y install hal dbus service messagebus start service haldaemon start lshal There will be a lot of stuff listed. From that list, you should be able figure out if you have the correct hardware.


1

Try xmllint and the --xpath option: <xml> <hello>world!</hello> </xml> $ xmllint --xpath '//hello/text()' world!


1

For unzip command with range expression in filename, we need to escape both the range format and the wildcard in target filename, e.g. to unzip files with txt extension in order0710.zip, ... order0715.zip into folder txt_pool, we should issue command like this: unzip -jn order071\[0-5].zip \*.txt -d txt_pool


1

Disable subscription manager and try Change enable=0 in /etc/yum/pluginconf.d/product-id.conf and /etc/yum/pluginconf.d/subscription-manager.conf [main] enabled=0 and then clean cache rm -rfv /var/cache/yum/* yum clean all


1

In centos, Mostly this problem is happened due to the cause of 2 versions of python are being installed in the same machine .. Centos is using python 2.6 by default with yum while there is another version of python that is installed and used in the current system by default .. that is why it is giving the following message It's possible that the above ...


1

If you're running Red Hat with Security Enchanced Linux enabled (SELinux), then you might be having a problem because SELinux is preventing sshd from reading $HOME/.ssh. To make SELinux happy, you have to do root@sshd-server# restorecon -Rv ~/.ssh To see if you're running with SELinux enabled use sestatus. Here's what it looks like if SELinux is ...


1

Run make mrproper first of all, before make menuconfig. This will make make modules and make modules_install work without errors. Then run make install after all the other steps.


1

Now I can't kill that port, and I can't use the port for anything else. How do I find the daemon to kill it (ps -ef doesn't show it) and close the port? I cannot use lsof because I'm using Redhat. Others have pointed out one of the errors in the above. A second error is that one cannot "kill" ports. Ports are not processes. A third error is the ...


1

coreutils doesn't depend on gcc in Red Hat land. That's just daft :) Probably the handiest is to use the script that I based the timeout command on: http://www.pixelbeat.org/scripts/timeout


1

What you want to look at a TFTP-server and configure your clients for PXE booting. Then take a look at https://access.redhat.com/site/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Network_Satellite/5.3/html/Deployment_Guide/s1-provisioning-kickstarting.html which is slightly out of date but should get you going.


1

The location of the config file is depending on the terminal application being used. If you are using Gnome Terminal the settings are stored in ~/.gconf/apps/gnome-terminal.



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