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25

It strongly depends on how you call your program with sudo or su. E.g. on the system on which I am in this moment: .bashrc COMMAND $HOME $USER Env. $PATH 1. sudo -i (root) root root [1] 2. sudo -s (USER) root USER /home/${USER}/bin:[1] 3. sudo /bin/bash (USER) root USER ...


19

If you have full sudo access, you can become root using sudo su -, so the security point is moot. Indeed, there is a way to discern the difference between a program ran as root and a program ran under sudo - using getuid vs geteuid - but this is a contrived trick. Why would a patch system do that?


5

There are a few differences if you are getting a root shell, as pointed out by @Hastur. If you are not getting a root shell, then there are more differences. The support member may have experience trying to do things like sudo patch -p0 < /root/patch.file where patch is run as root, but < (piping from a file) is not.


5

Note although the system call is called truncate, it actually is better interpreted as saying "Make my file report this many bytes in size". As per the system call manpage: The truncate() and ftruncate() functions cause the regular file named by path or referenced by fd to be truncated to a size of precisely length bytes. If the file previously was ...


3

The problem has been solved. There is small link at the lower left corner "Full disk summary and boot loader...". So click on this link, and you will probably see your disk drive and green mark, this means that bootloader will be installed, just uncheck this option and click continue, warning message will appear, but just ignore it. Now you can install RH ...


3

The wrong TZ is probably set via .profile, .bash_profile or bashrc, thus overriding the machine-wide TZ setting in /etc/timezone


3

On unix, the timezone for an individual process can be set by setting the environment variable TZ. Each process can have a different value for TZ and thus show a different timezone. If TZ isn't set, there's a system-wide default. In your second example, you ran ssh with specifying a command to run on the remote server. So ssh set up an ordinary interactive ...


3

your subnet and your range are in different networks. the range definition must be in the same network the subnet defines. Also, set your subnet address to .0, not 1. .1 is a host, .0 is a network. finally, every option must end with a semicolon (;) ... subnet 192.168.56.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 { range dynamic bootp 192.168.56.25 192.168.56.200; ...


3

This is a good command to determine your GUI: pgrep -l "gnome|kde|mate|cinnamon|lx|xfce|jwm"


2

In centos, Mostly this problem is happened due to the cause of 2 versions of python are being installed in the same machine .. Centos is using python 2.6 by default with yum while there is another version of python that is installed and used in the current system by default .. that is why it is giving the following message It's possible that the above ...


2

Run lsattr and make sure the files don't have the i attribute set. That means "immutable", and when it is set, nobody - not even root - can change them.


2

Try using the -t flag to see how the filename is stored, then specify the same name at the end of your extraction tar command, including any path/directories. As in tar --extract --file=some.tar exactfilename


2

The Apache API changed from 2.2 to 2.4, unixd_config was renamed ap_unixd_config (see Api changes from 2.2 to 2.4). You need a php module version that is compatible with Apache 2.4 or stay with Apache 2.2.


2

You probably have the command export $PATH (or something like it) in one of your initialization files (.profile, .bashrc, etc.)  Find it and change it, perhaps to export PATH (note: no $) or comment it out and see if anything breaks.


1

If you have pasted the public key to authorized_keys in the format shown in question (---- BEGIN SSH2 PUBLIC KEY ----), it won't work. You have to use one-line format shown in PuTTYgen labeled "Public key for pasting into OpenSSH authorized_kes file". It would be like: rsa-key ...


1

Why are you installing one item at a time via a script? No need to do this when you can just place all items in one line like this: yum -y install libstdc++.i686 ibibcm.x86_64 librdmacm.x86_64 ibsim.x86_64 ibutils.x86_64 libcxgb3.x86_64 libibmad.x86_64 libipathverbs.x86_64 Now that said, I don’t believe all of the yum -y install directives are running ...


1

The error message ("For a UEFI installation...") clearly indicates that your installer booted in EFI/UEFI mode, rather than in the BIOS mode that Windows XP certainly uses and that Mint probably also used. The workaround you found will result in a successful installation, but without a copy of GRUB. This is probably fine, since you can then run update-grub ...


1

For SSH in particular, you’ll probably need to make sure logging is enabled in /etc/ssh/sshd_config. Otherwise, it’s a vague question that depends on how you want to be alerted and the details of your system and its configuration, even how they log in. You could just tail a log file: tail -f /var/log/messages is common or journalctl -f on some Linux ...


1

Have you attempted to use some of the timing options of ncat? Here's the relevant event excerpt from man ncat(1). TIMING OPTIONS These options accept a time parameter. This is specified in seconds by default, though you can append ms, s, m, or h to the value to specify milliseconds, seconds, minutes, or hours. -d time, --delay time (Specify ...


1

if your CPU doesnt support virtualization, then thats just it, you cant VIRTUALIZE it. But as you said, you can install it beside your win7 installation. i would run the live cd and mess around before installing it, thats one way you can see if any errors occur.


1

Dualbooting seems the best option to use linux on your pc considering that your computer only has 2 gb of RAM and does not support virtualization. If you want to learn about RedHat linux you can use Centos and Fedora. RedHat Enterprise Linux 7 introduced systemd while Fedora started using systemd long before RHEL did. Centos 7 is equivalent to RHEL7.


1

You can use the HAL command lshal to get a list of all the hardware. You might need to install it and its dependencies first. yum -y install hal dbus service messagebus start service haldaemon start lshal There will be a lot of stuff listed. From that list, you should be able figure out if you have the correct hardware.


1

The symbol #, as explained in another answer, represents the command line prompt. In this case # represents the root's command line prompt and $ represents the command line prompt for another user. So check you are executing those commands as root.


1

You need to create a small script file to do your rename/move: call it rnmv, say, and put the following command into it: f="${1#./}"; echo mv "$f" "${f%%/*}.${f##*.}" Don't forget to chmod +x rnmv. Then go to the root directory and call rnmv from a find command: cd {wherever temp2 root is} find . -name "temp2.txt" -exec rnmv "{}" \; When you are happy ...


1

For disabling it permanently you can remove the iptables file from the directory /etc/rc.d/init.d.


1

In order to make use of of multiple CPU cores (other than runnig multiple bzip2 instances and encountering the problems you noticed) you can use a multi-threaded implementation of the bzip2 compression. There seem to be quite a few of them, unfortunately the default bzip2 (and the bzcat that comes with it) is not one of them. Here are links to a few of ...


1

Are you sure about it? AFAIK the temp tables are existing as long as they needed - for a query, but after they'll vanish. If you have as many active queries which needed 30GB temp tables that will cause you a lot more trouble than using all free space (I meant disk IO etc.) You can still playng with ulimit, but that'll need service restart at least, so I ...


1

If you have LVM, create a separate partition mount in required size. you can use the --tmpdir option to mysqld. Check this. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/temporary-files.html


1

I beleive when using sudo access, a log file is created, however when running directly through root access there is not.


1

You can use -A to specify how many lines after a match you want printed. grep -A 20 '`database`.`tablename`' dump.sql This will of course also include the match, and you can pipe that to a viewer. There's no need for head here.



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