Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Intel-based Macs use the GUID Partition Table (GPT) by default. GPT in turn supports up to 128 partitions by default (that value can be increased if necessary, although most partition tools don't enable you to do so). Thus, there's no problem with having more than four partitions on an Intel-based Mac. The limitation you've heard about is a distortion of ...


10

Installing rEFIt - at the sourceforge rEFIt page has a link to the CD Burning Instructions. You may also want to read this TripleBoot via BootCamp page at the onmac Wiki. Update on your comments. Extensions .dmg and .cdr are used for Disk Images created on Mac I suspect the Windows/Linux target file 'rEFIt-0.14.cdr.gz' is a gzipped ISO Try the ...


3

Worked for me on my Ubuntu box: renamed to .iso, then opened K3B, chose 'more options' -> 'burn image' and select the wanted file. First K3B says it's not a valid, but then I chose 'plain data image' on the 'image type' menu on the right and it would just burn it fine! Hope this helps.


3

Brasero on ubuntu appears to burn this file properly. As noted by one of the other commentors, this is not a windowsy ISO. Because it doesn't contain an ISO9660 filesystem, many burning software programs complain and even refuse to do anything with it. Brasero on ubuntu worked without a hickup. I simply renamed to .iso, right clicked and selected "Open with ...


3

Just get a copy of VirtualBox (it's free) and install your experimental stuff on that. You will use less aggregate disk space and the performance impact is minimal, especially for non-production uses.


3

The MintCast podcast just did an episode on Grub, which might be useful, but I would also go with virtualization, particularly if you are looking to try out multiple Linux dustributions. VirtualBox is free and quite good, but in the same situation I chose to use VMWare Fusion, as their web site has many "appliances" - prebuilt virtual machines with Linux ...


3

I found an answer at http://wiki.debian.org/MacBook/DebianInstallTutorial Thanks anyway ;-)


3

It's not because of GPT. It's because of MBR. There are many problems with MBR and GPT compatibility which limit partition number to 4. If you aren't using MBR at all, which could be happening, everything should work fine. New versions of windows support GPT, so there is a chance that MBR isn't being used. If you are using MBR, then I have no idea what's ...


3

Warning: Please be sure you have a good idea of what exactly is happening before following any advice that I write here. This may be risky! Please do a bit more Googling before pressing ENTER on a Linux terminal. :) I had this same problem after I removed a partition containing Windows 7 using Disk Utility. The problem in my case was that the Windows 7 ...


3

Grub is probably dropping to the console because the partition layout has changed since grub was first installed. Now that you have updated grub.cfg, re-installing grub should fix it. Boot into your ubuntu system the same way you did in order to run update-grub. From there, do a grub-install: grub-install /dev/sdX (Replacing X with your device, in your ...


3

Here's what I've come across on my findings on doing something similar. GRUB is a bootloader, it mainly accompanies Linux Distributions In order to install Windows on the same drive you will need to make sure the partition mapping is MBR, as Windows can only be installed on that Partition Layout, this gives you a further problem, as Mac OS X can only be ...


3

I don't know if it will entirely solve your problem but I may suggest a few steps regarding the USB boot, from what I learned setting up a dual boot (bootcamp) with no superdrive (two disks, like you) : You need to make the BootCamp Assistant think you're a Mac with rights to boot on a USB drive. To do that : Go to Applications/Utilities Right click on ...


3

I believe I figured out the cause of the issue. It was indeed an incompatibility with the way the Apple hardware communicated with the VESA drivers, I believe when switching modes on the built-in screen. When nomodeset was added to the kernel parameters, system could proceed to boot without crashing. The Macbook Pro is Late 2008, 5,1 with nVIDIA 9600m GT. ...


2

During my upgrade, I noticed the installer tried to repartition my disk to make space for something. Maybe it has overwritten your grub stage 1.5, so now you cannot load configuration and drivers; or maybe it changed the relative position of your Linux partition. In these cases, you will probably see grub rescue mode which takes some guess work to resolve. ...


2

I'm guessing the rEFIt/Grub/Ubuntu installation screwed up your GUID Partition Table (GPT) or your Pseudo Master Boot Record (PMBR). Now the Lion installer doesn't recognize it as a properly-formed GPT and doesn't think it should let you install to any HFS+ partitions on that disk, because it doesn't think the EFI bootROM will be able to find and boot from ...


2

Warning for all of the below: there's at least a slight possibility that trying to fix the disk structure will actually make things worse, possibly even making your various volumes unreadable. Back up everything important before attempting any of these fixes. Apple's KB article #TS3926 recommends either a full backup & reformat (probably not the ...


2

Anything interesting in /var/log/system.log or /var/log/kernel.log from when the slowness happens? Look especially for undefined or generic disk I/O errors. What exactly did it say was the problem it found that it could not repair? Update: From the fsck log messages you posted, I think it's time to either invest in Disk Warrior or another advanced HFS+ ...


2

I found this article which explains the partitioning scheme. Essentially, if I understand the article correctly, there is an “Extended Boot Record” on one of the partitions on one of the primary four partitions which describes the extra "extended" partitions. Some legacy operating systems cannot see them. Linux can see the extended partitions after the ...


2

While Windows 7 x86_64 supports GPT, it only supports UEFI or BIOS. Windows 7 does not support "Apple EFI" which is an amalgam of Intel EFI 1.1, and some bits of Apple's own and some bits of UEFI 2.x. It is not strictly a UEFI 2.x implementation which is what all non-Mac OS operating systems require. So this in effect limits Bootcamp (or rEFIt) users to ...


2

There's a good Grub 2 Guide on Ubuntu Forums; this is what I used during my recent Grub2 adventure. Here's another good Grub2 guide, and Ubuntu's Grub2 wiki page. You "uninstall" Grub from a partition by overwriting the boot code it wrote into the boot sector of that partition. Ideally, you'd have a backup of what was there before Grub was installed to ...


2

Multi-boot requires partitioning the disk. This is easier for a hardware RAID where the RAID disk appears as just one disk to both OS, but much harder for software RAID and especially across two very different operating systems. Some thoughts about solving this problem : I would think that one will need to partition each of the two disks in exactly the ...


1

I was struggling with this problem as well. I got the white screen with blinking grey folder/question mark on my macbook pro a1286 and needed to know whether or not it was the hard drive or logic board that was fried. I run Linux Mint on my lenovo p500 and I needed to burn the refit.014.cdr file to a cd to try and boot from the disk drive to see whether the ...


1

I've been able to boot from a 2GB USB stick on my Macbook Pro and a PC by following the instructions on Ubuntu's download page: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/ubuntu/download. Just choose the version options you want on the Download section and on the Burn your CD or create a bootable USB stick section, pick "USB stick" and the OS you're using to download ...


1

I'd recommend against removing it. You definitely need something to boot the kernel, but I don't know if rEFIt can do it. Also if you screw up settings on Arch, you'd definately want to have fallback. The easiest way to solve this would be to edit the timeout in grub.conf file. Just set it to 1 or 2 seconds so you can stop it if you need to actually do ...


1

SOLVED! I found a thread somewhere online (don't recall where) that mentioned adding 128 MB of free space after your Mac OS X partition. Apparently, Disk Utility won't install OS X on or allow any changes to the "Macintosh HD" partition if it's directly next to a Linux partition; this might apply to other types of partitions too. So I booted up from a ...


1

I triple booted on my Macbook pro with rEFIt between OSx Leopard, Ubuntu 8.04, and Windows XP. The rEFIt page says it does not support Windows Vista because of firmware issues, and since Windows 7 is based off of Vista, I do not think you will have much luck with it. Besides, to get my Mac to triple boot was an absolute pain. It required about 3 days of ...


1

I have been meddling around alot with Linux + OS X on my Mac, and it is my experience that the standard OS X tools will not touch your Linux partitions. The above heuristic indicates that OS X will not delete your Linux partition. To delete the Linux partition, I would re-install OS X. As a bonus, this solution would definitely clear out any lingering ...


1

Intel-based Macs require your boot drive to use the more modern GUID Partition Table (GPT) rather than the legacy Master Boot Record (MBR) to keep track of how the hard drive has been partitioned. For compatibility with OSes that aren't GPT-savvy, drives that use the GPT still have a Pseudo MBR (PMBR) that basically mirrors the information that's in the GPT. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible