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I don't have Notepad++ (because I only use Linux for development work) but I've tried your sample lines in the text editor Kate and found the following regular expression works to select only lines which fit the pattern above but do not contain "0.00" as their numeric value: ^Timetaken: (?!0\.0+$)([0-9]+\.[0-9]+)$ This regex says: "Timetaken: " appears ...


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The current accepted answer is wrong; it will not match the following even though it should: Timetaken: 0.0 Timetaken: 0.01 Timetaken: 0.0asdf foo Timetaken: 0.0 bar Timetaken: 10.0 There are four things wrong with it: It needs anchors (^ and $) so that it only matches the Timetaken thing if it is the only thing the line consists of. [00] is equivalent ...


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Here's a macro that will do what you want. (Unfortunately, Word doesn't allow you to search for a paragraph character and a wildcard at the same time.) This macro assumes that your questions are in their own paragraph. If they might be interspersed into a paragraph, you could use a while loop to keep expanding the selection character by character until you ...


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It is possible to find only documents that have UTF-8 characters or only like "iso-8859-1"? No, that is not possible in UTF-8 without BOM. The only difference is how to interpret the characters and NOT the characters themselves.


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MS Office does not support regular expression just as the source code editor like Notepad++. You can try this, it does not fully work though: <*201[0-9]> Here is the MS help that discusses wild cards and regular expressions in MS Office. ...


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The MS Word regex seriously lacks functionality. If you absolutely need to stay in word (and can't find another editor that both has good regex support and retains MS Word markup), I found a possible workaround for you using the word regex: 1) Prefix every line with a character that you know does not appear in your text. Say "#". You would get: ...


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In Windows? I don't know "Bulk File Renamer". I would use Total Commander's "Multi Rename" tool. Better yet, I'd probably work with perl or awk from a Cygwin terminal for a more comprehensive script solution. That would go too far for here though. Just from a regex perspective, this works for me in TC with your filename (but only if files do not contain ...


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Unfortunately, there are many flavors of regex syntax out there, each with its own slight (or sometimes not-so-slight) variations. Assuming you are using GNU sed, either of these options would work: $ echo dir/subdir/subsubdir | sed 's|[^/]\+|..|g' ../../.. $ echo dir/subdir/subsubdir | sed -r 's|[^/]+|..|g' ../../.. In general, you'll want to check the ...



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