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3

Given that the server is not located near your computer, the answer is always going to be no. When you connect to the server over the internet, it will take time for a package to go from your pc, to your ISP, to the ISP of the server to the server, and then back again to your pc following that same route. This can mean that for each packet, it can take ...


3

That user is still technically logged in; their running tasks will still continue, but when you close your remote session they will still see the users' login page & have to re-enter credentials to get back into their desktop. As far as I'm aware there is no real indication of when you left the session. This is based on my usual procedure of logging in ...


2

I have 4 PC's running 8 monitors and Synergy runs across the lot no problem. All PC's are running windows 7 but I used to run Win XP as well on the same network


2

You're experiencing problems due to more than just latency. In the default configuration Remote Desktop does a poor job of handling graphics, making even the fastest server or Internet connection seem slow. But if you're running games based on Flash, Silverlight or DirectX, you can make these graphics-intense games playable over RDP with RemoteFX. ...


1

I know you are low on space, but I use RD Client by Microsoft. It's free on the play store. The size does make it tricky but there are options to help. I also found the 'hackers' keyboard to be a good choice if coding. Obviously you'll need to have already configured your PC to allow incoming connections. If you haven't, you can try to set this up ...


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VNC does exactly this. There's dozens of different VNC servers and clients though: https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=VNC


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This is implemented as a new feature called "Dynamic Resolution Update" and was introduced in Windows 8.1. As long as the resolution is set to "Full Screen" on the client, the desktop resolution will be kept in sync with the client. One of the changes we’ve made as part of RDP 8.1 is the addition of a new message that can be sent from the client to ...


1

Install the application Karabiner Once installed, open Karabiner: From the 'Change Key' tab, expand the 'For Applications' section 'Enable at only Remote Desktop Connection Client' sub-section Check 'Change command key to control key in RDC' Now when you use the new RDP app, you can continue to use Cmd instead of Ctrl.


1

It's quite easy. Get your user to log into an RDP session. Then log into the same server using your credentials. Go to Remote Desktop Services Manager. Then right click on the Active user whose session you want to join and click Remote Control. They will receive a permission message and that's it - you're in the same session.


1

This has recently become possible to do with the Chrome Remote Desktop App. Brief instructions: Install the Chrome Remote Desktop App on the Chromebook and Chrome on your computer. On the Chromebook: (You'll have to show your grandmother how to do this.) Launch the app. (I guess the most convenient way would be to Pin it to the Shelf ahead of time.) ...


1

+1 for Input Director. Synergy/Synergy+ gave me some troubles, but Input Director has been a stable experience on my setup (2 laptop PCs, 1 tower PC, 5 monitors). YMMV, of course. I can slide my mouse cursor across monitors like one giant tiled desktop. Input Director defines connected computers as master-slave. From a single keyboard, I can control a ...


1

This typically occurs if you connect to the same server from two different computers that have different resolutions. For example, a desktop that has 1920x1080 and a notebook that has 1280x1024. This GPO setting should prevent the desktop shortcuts from being re-arranged: Policy location: User Configuration > Policies > Administrative Templates > ...


1

As far as I know nobody has ever managed to properly reverse engineer all the ins and outs of the RDP protocol. It is notoriously difficult because of subtle differences from Windows version to Windows version. Implementing this on another OS with a totally different display architecture is even worse, because RDP is very closely tied to the way Windows ...


1

Having once labeled myself a "Major PC guy", you will do yourself a tremendous favor in the long run to consider re-inventing yourself into "Colonel Cross Platform". Hey, consider it a promotion. In all seriousness, an open mind will help you appreciate and understand the differences. That said, you can use VNC (many different flavors available for Windows) ...


1

If you really need to use RDP and cannot use the alternatives people proposed in their answers, there is a similar question here. The two answers there are use either iRAPP, but as I understand it you must use their client as well, or using xrdp, which you may have to compile from source (I found this relatively recent tutorial for that).


1

Yes. The possible size of your RDP session screen size is always determined by the video capabilities connecting computer, not by the machine you are accessing remotely. An RDP session uses a virtual video driver on the host computer which is completely independent from any actual connected displays. In fact, if this weren't so it wouldn't be possible to ...



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