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9

There's these pesky things called "Physics" and "Legal regulation of power and frequency bands" The amount of power needed to transmit follows something called the inverse square law - transmission power doubles with distance. You could, in theory, use highly directional antennae on either end (which are more efficient since you arn't blasting signal ...


3

you would need a directional antenna at each site, this is assuming you could achieve LOS (line of site). There are various sites that can give you an idea of what hardware you will need and how much you need to boost the signal. You could try searching for "long range wifi directional antenna" Example here.


2

With IPv6, you typically don't need NAT and port forwarding because every machine on your network gets its own public IP address, this address is the address that Google is giving you when you Google "Whats my IP". Your router should have an IPv6 firewall that is currently blocking incoming connections to the IPs on your LAN. You will need to allow ...


1

Seeing as you don't even saturate half of the standard N bandwidth, if you don't plan on connecting to some other computer and transfer large amount of files (as in create Wireless LAN) then no, there's no reason to upgrade. I've heard nothing new safety-wise about 802.11ac. I see there's a fan in it (good grief) so another source of noise and vibrations. ...


1

There may be an advantage, it depends on your environment. As you increase the distance from your wireless access point, your bandwidth decreases. If you have any spots around your house that suffer from low bandwidth, an 802.11ac router may clear this up. For example, I can get a connection on my front porch, but Netflix typically drops its quality out ...


1

I would first recommend isolating which side of the access is truly dropping (or both). Clients (and by clients I mean your servers, desktops/laptops, etc.) should be able to connect to your internal network and the router, even if you are unable to access the internet. If this is the case then you have at least isolated the issue is between the router and ...


1

I am not a network specialist, but I would throw out two things to look at. You seem to be using POE devices. I've seen something similar happen at a hospital and it was due to the two areas not sharing a common ground. The ground was described as "floating" and zero voltage at one side of the campus was higher than the other. Power as a result flowed ...


1

USB bluetooth dongles are usually written for Windows only, sometimes with Mac support and rarely with Linux support. But Linux ones exist nonetheless. Wifi dongle not required unless you actually have a wireless modem to connect to. If you have a wireless modem/router, you can use both wired network cable for the desktop and wireless network for the ...


1

You can get a wireless USB network adapter for less than £10 on Amazon. You can set it up as a hotspot and share your wired internet connection with your phone/tablet. I advise using Wifi over Bluetooth because you'll get a better range with your Wifi.


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There's two options - some phones support reverse tethering, but not all phones support it. In many cases you need root, and your phone is tied into the router. Alternately you can use the lovely hostapd to do this. You'll be using a slightly unusual setup here since we're bridging our AP to the other router, rather than running a whole seperate network. ...


1

If you have blocked the only open port pointing to the system you shouldn't have an issue (since it doesn't accept traffic), although if you are going to block traffic you might as well turn off the port via your router. Changing the port is largely pointless. Security through obscurity won't stop, for example, a generic HTTP DDoS request to the server, ...


1

https url block is not supported except in some newer models in routers. you can block these urls using your host file entry. Steps: 1) open hosts file in notepad form the location "\Windows\System32\drivers" 2) add the following lines after the last line 127.0.0.1 https://www.facebook.com 127.0.0.1 http://www.facebook.com result: it ...


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That is a very standard thing to be doing, so yes it can be done, and easily. Simply read up on using your router and whatever OS you have running on your devices you want to have static IPs on. There are two standard ways of doing this: Use your router to set static IPs for which ever network devices you want on static IPs to have a DHCP reservation set ...


1

A PPPoE password is usually the one from your internet provider. I would contact them so they can reset the password. You can then change it there to what they've given you. It is unlikely you will be able to "hack" this password, as the router will not show it to you, but will only allow you to change it to something else.


1

Routers are for connecting networks. NAT is just one of the functions. If we are talking IPv6 only network, yes they provide end-to-end connection, but that doesn't mean your computer knows about every device on the Internet. You still need connection to your ISP which will route your requests.



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