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9

Some options: Unplug the router, open it, desolder the button and remove it from the circuit board. Plug the hole with something permanent (epoxy). Place the router someplace your son doesn't have access to (locked cabinet). Ground him.


4

A typical consumer router has three different network interfaces: WAN LAN Wireless LAN Each of these interface has its own MAC address.


3

Since your router is reporting an IP different to your public IP, it's likely that your 3G network provider isn't allocating you a public IP and is instead performing NAT, which would also explain why port forwarding isn't working. This is confirmed if a.b.c.d is in a private IP address range: From 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255. From 172.16.0.0 to ...


3

The problem with the length and bitrate is closely related to the way how bits are represented. The following description is valid for basic amplitude modulation that applies to your proposal of "sending bits through a cable". As @sawdust points out in the comment below, modern networks do things rather differently [1]. Ones and zeros are expressed by ...


2

Google for "buffer bloat". As RAM became cheap, networking gear added frame buffers so they never have to drop a frame. Unfortunately, frame drops was how TCP noticed congestion and knew when to back off. Without dropped frames, traditional TCP implementations never notice the congestion and never back off, so they just keep sending at high rates and make ...


2

Using a static IP and removing the default gateway worked for me. Before doing anything, run a command prompt and type in IPConfig /all. Note the DNS server address, and whether you're using DHCP or not. Go to Network and Internet settings in Windows, then Change Adapter settings. Select the wired connection, then edit its properties. Select Internet ...


2

You find out by looking up the DSL standards that the modem supports. DSL standards give you a theoretical maximum speed the link can offer. Note that there are different variants of DSL, such as ADSL and VDSL. A list of ADSL standards is available on Wikipedia, for example. You'll find VDSL2 speeds here. Of course, in reality, those speeds may be lower ...


1

With wireless, there are a number of things you can check or try to see if you can improve the available bandwidth. You really aren't even beginning to stretch the limits of the wireless or wired connections, though. If just the wireless is slow, avoiding interference is best. 1a. You can try changing the wireless channel that the Netgear is set to, ...


1

If your router’s IP is 192.168.1.1 while the devices running RouterOS are indeed accessible via 192.168.0.2-7, they’re most definitely not in your network. RouterOS is a MikroTik product and not related to your Linksys router in any way. Update From the traceroute output, we can see that your ISP, which provides wireless internet access, manages its ...


1

RouterOS is a Linux distro made by MikroTik for their proprietary routing hardware. My guess is that you have one or more MikroTik devices on your network. These were likely provided by your ISP. Since they are in a different subnet (192.168.0.0/24 vs 192.168.1.0/24), that usually indicates the router hardware that directly connects to the ISP network, ...


1

QoS is unlikely to help you & is notoriously difficult to get right anyway. In your case, you will be better off creating some backup profiles in CrashPlan (which I also run on a Synology NAS) with each set to a suitable maximum bandwidth. The bigger problem I have is actually that, being Java based, CrashPlan is a hog with large numbers of files to ...


1

Routers creates a new network if and only if you plug in your network source into the WAN port (sometimes colored yellow). If you need your router to continue to broadcast your initial network source, plug the source into any of the other Ethernet ports (mostly colored blue), and not the WAN port. This makes the router act as an access-point, which just ...


1

High latency happens when packets make it into a queue to be transmitted across a very busy link. All packets ahead of it in queue must be sent through first. When the demand on a link is great, and queue buffers are large, this leads to high round-trip times.


1

You could always try filling the hole with glue, Sugru etc (though that's a bit expensive for the microdot size you'd need)


1

Parallel is the way to go. With cascade, device in the network connected to Router 2 can access everything connected to Router 1. Service discovery won’t work because it’s a different broadcast domain, but that’s it. If you know the address(es) or actively scan, everything is accessible.


1

Every network interface has its own MAC-address. I don't know much about linksys routers but, I'm assuming you just have three interfaces, which isn't unlikely for routers. These would be: Internal interface: You probably have some ethernet port on the back panel. These are just part of a switch, which is then connected to router internally. This internal ...


1

1 Base MAC Address + 1 MAC address per interface


1

The gateway PC could in theory apply QoS policies to all the traffic that passes through it, which in this case would be any traffic to/from the Internet (via the modem), but not local LAN traffic amongst the wired and wireless LAN devices. Whether or not the gateway/QoS software on your gateway PC supports doing that is a different matter.



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