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0

This could be caused by the number of available IP address in your subnet. if you only allow 100 connection in the DHCP server, any new device won't be able to connect.


0

It helps if you give exact configuration details, router config files, IP settings computers etc. (I can't comment so I had to put this in answer). Did you compare the settings of your computer/notebook's ethernet (lan) and wifi network adapter? For example look at Ip settings and check for 'client for microsoft network' Are these different If yes correct ...


3

If you want to hook it up to your phone line and run it locally you would need something to act as a PABX - In addition to the phones you will need a box which has an FXO port (to connect to the phone line), and PABX functionality - probably something running Asterisk PBX. (You could have the FXO port separate or built into the device). That said, that ...


0

This usually comes down to either channel support issues (which you may have ruled out) or using a hidden (non-broadcast) SSID, which some clients had been configured to scan for (added to their preferred networks list) and others had not. Make sure you haven't set your AP (Wi-Fi router) to hide its SSID. As for channel issues, channels 12, 13, and 14 ...


0

Am I correct to assume that the WAN IP / Public IP assigned to me by my ISP is at the external side of the modem Yes, the IP assigned by your ISP is associated with the WAN (wide area network, or "external") side of your modem. or is it on the external side of the wireless router? No. (We know this because you have a public IP and because you ...


0

I disabled 802.11n. On my model of wireless card, iwlwifi seems to have some issue with 802.11n. This explains why it had an issue with two identical routers but not with a cheap ISP-provided router - perhaps the two routers support 802.11n but the old ISP-provided router doesn't.


0

There is enough data out there now that shows that, even non ionizing radiation is detrimental to health and it does affect the cells in your body. I'm hypersensitive to RF radiation, EMF's and Dirty Electricity and I develop physical symptoms when exposed to certain levels. Just because you can't see it doesn't mean it can't cause harm. And in these ...


0

The fastest solution is to use a network cable. But that might be inconvenient, depending on how many walls you would have to go through, etc. You can also use power line networking, by plugging network adapters into your power outlets by the router and the computer downstairs. This can be a slow or unstable solution however. Lastly you can install a PCI ...


0

Provided you didn't place your computer in the DMZ from your router, the closest IP to a public IP would be your WAN facing port on your router. You can log into the router and see what is assigned to it. A Trace route command should also let you know what the IP is on the WAN side of the router. From the DOS prompt try this: tracert 216.58.216.110 This ...


0

Yes, a cheap router can affect Internet speed through Ethernet, especially on slow ( < 3 Mbps) connections. Even the cheapest routers on the market today have hardware that's more than capable of handling the speeds of your Internet connection, but unfortunately, cheap routers tend to have "bufferbloat" problems on slow connections, increasing latency ...


-1

I have had the same wifi issues with my lat 2012 Macbook Air (I7, 512ssd, 8GB) and haven't really been able to use it for the last three years as a result. This is where it gets a little weird... Since the computer was basically useless without an internet connection (and Apple refused to acknowledge that this was an "issue" ???), I partitioned and ...


0

issue resolved: i forwarded/targeted the preferred port in the router, enabled upnp and zero config in the Arris TG862 gateway, downloaded port maps for mac and routed local ssh to the public port. thank you for responding!


1

To check at which point or hop your port is being blocked use tracetcp. its very simple as below. To check port 31 all the way to destination: $ tracetcp www.ebay.co.uk:31 Tracing route to 66.135.192.41 [www.ebay.co.uk] on port 31 Over a maximum of 30 hops. 1 1 ms 1 ms 1 ms 192.168.0.1 [wintermute] 2 10 ms 13 ms 9 ms ...


4

My guess would be, yes, that kind of devices tends to have a slow-ish CPU which might be getting overwhelmed by the DHCP requests & renewals, and/or a small amount of RAM causing the leases to no longer fit. (Especially since there's often a lot of services packed into it alongside DHCP – e.g. a DynDNS updater, an UPnP server, some NAS software...) ...


0

I don't know much this helps, but using the DD-WRT OpenVPN GUI works fine for me. I have not yet got the CLI to work: I have a remote OpenVPN server that works fine with my PCs and Android phones. I recently put dd-wrt on my routers, a D-Link DIR-825 and a Netgear r7000; I'm now just using the r7000. I have a USB stick in the router, which for example ...


0

I am not quite sure if I understand your question in the right way. I will give it a try: WAN IP/public IP should be associated with the external IP of your cable modem. The WAN gateway then is the internal IP of your cable modem. And the modems "internal" IP is what from your wireless routers point of view would be called the gateway. So your network ...


1

Change Router #2's IP address to something else (e.g. 192.168.200.254). Disable the DHCP server on Router #2. Configure the security camera to use a static IP that is outside of Router #1's DHCP scope (e.g. 192.168.200.250) and set it's default gateway to Router #2 (192.168.200.254). Connect Router #1 and Router #2 together with a switch using their LAN ...


0

When using WIFI you will always be at the whimm of those arround you - you really need to switch to a wired connection to guarantee a stable, low latency connection to your router. Its quite probable that even when using the best WIFI channel other channels with overlap and interfere with your performance. (there are only 3 non-overlapping channels in ...


0

In this case, poe7 most likely indicates a PPPoE tunnel interface, which is the interface providing your DSL Internet connection. Power over Ethernet (PoE) is a feature provided on Ethernet interfaces, and would not change the name of the interface (it would still just be Eth0, Gig0, etc.). The routing table here shows that the default route (gateway) is ...


0

My suggestion would be to use WPA2, and if you have problems switch to WPAWPA2. If the network has constantly changing devices, then you are probably fine with WPAWPA2


0

After more testing, I belive the router have a hardware fault in the 5 ghz part. After running a longer ping test (view stats below) on the 2.5ghz net, the loss was 0% and the ping not more than 350 ms max. I downloaded a 3,84 gb file via torrent, and saw a similar download curve as with wire. --- 192.168.1.1 ping statistics --- 452 packets transmitted, ...


0

By giving a quick look: global (outside) 1 interface nat (inside) 0 172.16.1.0 255.255.255.0 outside nat (inside) 0 AsusWireless 255.255.255.0 outside the IDs of the objects are different (0 vs 1), try: global (outside) 1 interface nat (inside) 1 172.16.1.0 255.255.255.0


2

Enabling Optware is not the same as enabling JFFS. JFFS is used as an alias for the partition at /jffs. It’s usually hosted on the router’s flash memory. However, you can use mount --bind to place it on virtually any partition. (Enabling it on internal flash may be required anyway.) To enable JFFS on internal flash, follow these instructions: The steps ...


1

Not a proper answer, but to long for just comments: Spinning rust (aka classical HDD)s can be written many times. Flash cells are more fragile and will fails with far fewer writes. If you combine a filesystem which is not aware of that (e.g. FAT which keeps its directory listing in one place and updates that quite often) with raw access to flash based ...


0

I don't know if you managed to solve your problem. I can confirm that it DOES work in bridged mode just fine. What user/password are you logging in with? You might try the following: user: admin pass: Ql52jP23 (the second character is a lowercase letter L) Works with the web access as well as with telnet (at least with the F660s in my country, your ISP ...


2

Do you mean you are trying to get two LANs of the same subnet to talk via a VPN? You use the term "192.168.0.x" so one would assume you are talking about a range of IPs within the given 192.168.0.x subnet. The reason why you can't (and shouldn't) is due to the fact that a router's job is to route traffic from a known network to an unknown network. When a ...


-1

Use systemctl --force stop wpa_supplicant.service, then start hostapd v2.1 as normal.


0

See this link : http://www.talktalkmembers.com/t5/Unlimited-Broadband/DDNS-settings-on-HG533/td-p/844595 It says: ...Unfortunately, there is a bug in the GNUDip.http implementation on all Huewai TT routers - the salt, sign and pass parameters are not correctly passed to the server - they are sent, but missing the last character in each case. So, with an ...


0

Yes and no. In order for your Internet router to provide connectivity to the Internet, it must be the gateway. In simple terms, a gateway links together two network segments that would otherwise be unable to communicate. Technically your second router can provide DHCP services to your network, but it would need to tell clients that the other router is the ...


0

You give a lot of specs about your router, but nothing about the devices connecting to it. If the devices with which you connect are able to match highest connection protocol of you router then you should be able to attain the speed of the of the ISP. Things to consider, the distance between your devices and the router and the connection protocol you are ...


0

The Archer C7 is not a dual-WAN router: http://www.tp-link.com/sa/products/details/cat-9_Archer-C7.html#specifications So you will only be able to plug one internet service into it at a time, as far as I can see. The other questions don't really make sense in this context.


0

As I read in Internet DSL Router use a Phone Line and need username/password provided by ISP to connect to WAN using PPPoE/PPPoA protocol, but for Cable Router (using coaxial cable) they don't need access credential to access the Internet. I did the reset correctly and modified the default Wifi Channel, SSID, Wifi key and the default Admin password and now ...


0

turns out because I had a cron job for wget to a URL which i need updated for my DNS service, everytime the wget command was ran (which was hourly) the html file would be saved and I didnt setup a command to delete it, this is what was consuming the memory.


1

Wireshark can collect packets on any interface that has those packets passing it. If you are running wireshark on a PC etc, then you will collect data from the machine it is running on to any other machine on the network. If there is a hub in between that machine and any other machine you will see all of its traffic also. (hubs rarely exist in networking ...


1

Wireshark will collect only packets that pass trough its Ethernet interface, so it depends on the LAN deployment. For example, if the devices and the router connect to a switch, then Wireshark will collect only packets directed to the router, going out of the router and broadcast packets. if the devices and the router connect to a hub, then Wireshark will ...


1

Your network is most likely switched. That means that (except for some initial traffic) unicast packets only take the most direct router from source to destination. This means you have to be a man in the middle to capture traffic. You’re currently running on the router, that means you have access to all non-internal communication. The Wireshark wiki has a ...


1

Check the speed / duplex configured on your ethernet interface, and if it's possible set it to autonegotiate. Your ethernet port will adapt to the speed and duplex capabilities offered by the router and it's very likely the connection be signaled by green instead of orange.


0

I experienced something similar, but I can't tell you if this applies to you. I had a wireless Access Point hooked up in my LAN that acted as a simple bridge. It did not support IPv6. However... it somehow managed to 'reflect' IPv6 packets back into the network with a different MAC address. So my PC would see packets coming in with its own IPv6 address but ...


0

What I find unusual is that you have your DVR connected to the modem and not the router. Therefore you have a direct connection to the Internet with your DVR and the IP address of the DVR would be issued by your ISP. Most ISPs allow the connection of multiple devices but limit the number of IP addresses they dish out. That is why most people have a router if ...


0

These routers are known for being clocked too high which causes overheating, they need a heatsink mounted on the CPU, this will solve the restarting issues.


2

There are two ways to achieve an internal DNS record. You have to define an A-record on your DNS server. If you are running a Microsoft Windows server, this is quite simple to achieve. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/articles/adding-host-a-dns-records-in-windows-server-2008-r2 . If you are using the default DNS service of your router, it will differ on the ...


0

Basically You have a few options here: You need to check if your router is supported by custom firmwares, I suggest the one called dd-wrt. If yes, follow these steps to enable easy home monitoring. There is a program that is for web development but You can also use it to monitor your web traffic. It is called Fiddler. Check the site for more information. ...


0

Home routers, such as D-Link ones, generally offer little, if any, monitoring capability, but the question also is what type of monitoring do you want to do? Do you just want to monitor bandwidth utilization or do you want to be able to examine the details of every packet flowing through the router as one could do through a packet analyzer such as WireShark? ...


0

I hope you found your solution, but for people looking for an answer: When you forward a port on your router, you need to specify the IP of the device which host the service. In your forwarding table you use 192.168.53.1 which is the router IP. So if your Web server is on 192.168.53.10, you should use this address. Also to be sure that the device keeps the ...


1

The general answer is: you have to have all details about how to connect to your ISP. ... and this will of course depend on their setup entirely. This MAY be as simple as just connecting the cables correctly - assuming: DHCP in use at your ISP, DHCP client (towards ISP/WAN) in the router and DHCP server (towards the LAN) in the router, and DHCP ...


1

Yes, option: purchase access with a VPN service that allows for a static IP and port forwarding, you will be able to have clients talk directly to your device(s) as you'd expect. Option two: Find a deal on a VPS (Virtual Private Server) and configure a popular VPN software like OpenVPN yourself. End result is the same, configuration part is much more ...


1

There should not be a problem there, phones and internet are different. And some tips on a router, don't buy cheap stuff. I would recommend something AC, or N, but remember, you cant expect 100meg downloads from your router, if A: your device doesn't support ac, and B: if your not paying for 100meg internet. No WiFi will be faster than a wired connection.


1

It would seem SlickVPN only allow connections with OpenVPN clients, which as you know the DrayTek you have does not support for. The 2820n (the 2820Vn, is the same model as the 2820n with VOIP support so for the purposes of setup guides etc on the VPN search for 2820n) supports PPTP, IPSec, L2TP and L2TP over IPSec. So you have those options to choose ...



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