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0

You really should correct your question particularly when I pointed out the error in it, you left it there with the error. I have actually once implemented what you speak of, in two different ways, with only one port open, VNCing to any computer behind the network. Method 1- SSH to the NAT router which forwards to one machine, but specify in the ssh ...


2

Yes. You will be using one-to-one NAT to achieve the publicIP > privateIP mapping. TP-Link and Linksys offer these settings on some consumer price-point routers (80-$120). Verify in the product documentation before purchase. You'll usually find the setting under either 'Advanced > NAT > One-to-One NAT' or 'Setup > One-to-One NAT'. The documentation of your ...


0

I would say that Access Point (AP) doesn't give you IP addresses. If you plug in to its WAN port, the IP address should be the same from it's 'upper' source (ISP, company's LAN, and hotel etc.). On the other hand, Router would provide you different IP segments. The IPs you've got, to your iPhone, iPad, or wireless devices, should be in different segment ...


2

Potentially. For example, if you use the router on a small network to cache DNS requests, then the DNS traffic will hit the LOCAL interface. Same thing if you use it for DHCP and any other network service. See above. If you want use the router to cache DNS requests, then you will have to permit its LOCAL to talk to WAN, just like LAN does. Rulesets are ...


0

Here it is: iptables -I INPUT 1 -i lo -j ACCEPT iptables -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp -d somewebsite.com --dport 80 -j ACCEPT iptables -A INPUT -m conntrack --ctstate ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -P INPUT DROP iptables -P OUTPUT DROP This will permit DNS and access to the specified domain. If you want to get ...


5

In some ways, this is the same as asking "how does the internet work through air" when referring to wifi. The OSI model of networking describes each layer of a network, and one of the crucial elements of this is that each layer should operate independently of the layer above it or below it. Sometimes this gets a little muddied, and layers overlap a bit, ...


0

I am assuming that for the customers using ISP1 you have the ISP1 router as their default gateway, and then for ISP2 users you have the ISP2 router as their default gateway. And then you have all users set to use the DNS of ISP1 Using the DNS Public IP address in clients In this scenario, if anyone on the ISP2 router does a DNS query, the request will be ...


1

I faced this problem with DHCP recently. I searched the internet and could not find a step by step solution. So I had to contact an IT person. I made a tutorial which I am posting here for everyone. Here it is: https://cupntea.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/how-to-access-your-router-when-dhcp-is-disabled-2/ I hope it helps as a general guide.


0

Possibly JFFS just isn't enabled. In the DD-WRT admin interface, go to the Administration > Management tab. Check whether JFFS2 is enabled in the JFFS2 Support section. If it isn't, enable it and click the Save button. You'll probably need to restart the router for the change to take effect.


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Many modern routers include Quality of Service (QoS) features. You should be able to use QoS to limit bandwidth for any device based on its IP address. For example, one of my routers is a Netgear WNDR3700, running the open source DD-WRT firmware. In the QoS settings, I have a Netmask Priority rule set up to limit one particular device (192.168.0.108/32) to ...


0

The unstable connection turned out to be a problem with Mac OS X Yosemite (v10.10.3) and is apparently a common thing. It was not a problem with the modem, router, or ISP. There are numerous potential solutions to this problem posted all over the internet, but the one that worked for me was found in this Apple discussion thread. Solution Move your ...


0

There exists some software solution which allow to combine multiple internet connection to get the speed of sum of all the connection. Windows Connectify dispatch (paid) Linux ISP unity Dispatch proxy All you need to do is to connect all devices/modems using usb/wifi/bluetooth and combine the connections using any of the given software.


1

On your router if you can run iptables, default drop anything incoming on the outward-facing interface, and then add exceptions: A simple example of what you describe, presuming eth1 is the outward-facing device: iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -j DROP iptables -I FORWARD -i eth1 -s ...


0

If you have a wired connection already, setting up another wireless network is trivial: Get a router or access point, turn off its DHCP server (if any) and make sure its IP address doesn’t collide with the existing router. Then, set up the wireless network to your liking. You might want to use the “original” network’s configuration to enable roaming (of ...


0

For placed that are covered badly by my wifi router I use a repeater plugged to the wall which extends the routers signal. There are drawbacks but depending on the repeater they are fairly cheap and easy to setup. Other choice would be to connect a second wifi router to the cable where currently your switch is connected. Quickest solution you could test ...


2

To connect networks you need a router. If you like to connect 192.168.2.0/24 and 192.168.3.0/24 use your Windows server because a) it is already connected to both networks b) it has the RRAS (Routing and Remote Access) which turns the server into a router when configured Next, you need to set the IPs of the server as default gateways on the clients. That'd ...


0

ZTE ZXHN F660 havent Port-Forwarding capabilities. Router IPv6 / IPv4 Dual Stack NAT/ SNTP ALG Static routing, and dynamic routing in RIPV1/V2 PPPoE Client/Pass Through DNS Client/Server IGMP v1/ v2/ v3 IGMP proxy/snooping Datasheet


0

I had problems with disconnects, slow internet and modem problems so here are the things I did Prior to Nov 2014 I had a SB6121 modem and comcast Blast 50/10 and don't recall any problems with disconnects or speed. In Nov 2014 (I think) I upgraded to extrem 105 and started having disconnect problems randomly (bad modem??) Jan 2015 upgraded modem to ...


1

To prevent unauthorized access to router services from the WAN interface, just change the default password on the admin account (ubnt). See the article Password Recovery Speeds. It describes maximal crack time for a random password, by password length and the characters used. For example, the time needed to crack B33r&Mug by a distributed network of ...


2

Nice looking router. Q1 Answer: No. The only traffic considered local would be, as you mentioned, ssh and webui traffic, as well as DHCP server traffic if you're utilizing the DHCP server feature of the router. Q2 Answer: Yes. That would drop all traffic destined for the router from the WAN. I suggest creating a rule named MgmtAccess (order it above the ...


1

Can I make my older devices see the 5GHz band? No. Because your older devices are using hardware that only can connect to 2.4GHz 802.11 networks. You also cannot purchase USB 802.11 devices for phones and smart TVs. Maybe by buying a 5 GHz wireless USB adapter for the TV and the Android box? If you willing to buy hardware. The simplest solution ...


1

Most 5GHz routers can broadcast on both the 5GHz and 2.4GHz frequencies simultaneously. Check your wireless router manual. This is often called “Simultaneous Dual Band”, or “Dual Band Concurrent”.


4

This is neither trivial or easy. You can use a multi-WAN capable router, but unless your provider natively supports PPP multilink you will also need a server at the other end with sufficient bandwidth to terminate the connection. Otherwise you can only use simple load balancing between the connections which gives you, in simple terms, the ability to download ...


0

Okay. I cracked it. It had to do something with wrong pattern matching in the expect part in the final lines of the code. What I, first of all, did was generate a recorded script using autoexpect. This tool is used to records your sessions and generate a script based on that. To do so, I first installed the autoexpect package (available in expect-dev ...


1

Connect to your server with SSH and make a tunnel for SMB traffic from your client to your server. Something like: ssh -L 137:127.0.0.1:137 -L 138:127.0.0.1:138 -L 139:127.0.0.1:139 -L 447:127.0.0.1:447 you@your.server.address And then use: smbclient //localhost/Testing -U user This creates a tunnel that forwards traffic from the client computer ports ...


3

Your system appears to be compromised with a spambot. The activity your router is logging is indicative of a spambot running on your computer. These spambots post automated spam messages in various blog comment sections and forums to these sites in order to generate traffic and boost search engine rankings. The queries listed here are used to determine ...


0

I immediately spot two problems with your configuration. RFC 4193 addresses are not globally routable. That means those addresses won't be able to communicate with the outside world. Sure you can use NAT, but NAT is known to cause numerous problems. NAT is a workaround intended to temporarily address the shortage of IP addresses. IPv6 solves that problem. ...


0

There's no particular reason you should be able to ping a web site. Web sites are intended to respond to HTTP queries and they may or may not respond to pings. Unless you know for a fact that there's some reason it should work, it shouldn't concern or surprise you if it doesn't.


2

Three possibilities off the top of my head: 1) ICMP is being blocked somewhere along the way. Try to find a tcpping tool for your platform to see if this makes a difference. 2) Packet loss. Try with more than just four pings. On windows this means adding the -t switch: ping -t 4.2.2.2 (or some other hostname or address). If you eventually get some coming ...


1

I can confirm that this will work. I've seen this implemented in enterprise environments with cubicles that weren't originally built out with dual data drops in each pod, but had the requirement introduced due to VOIP upgrades. Given how sensitive VOIP can be, and that no issues were present with this solution, I have no reservation in recommending it for ...


0

I understand the interest of splitting an existing ethernet run to 2 user. But I believe you will have severe interference caused by the splitting. I bet it won't even work if both splits are connected to device, even if powered off. There are already suggestions about using a switch and also running an extension from room B to room C. But I would bring up ...


2

You need a switch in your bedroom. Switches at Amazon A switch will allow you to use full network bandwidth when you are the only one using the bedroom Ethernet run. But you will still be sharing Internet bandwidth with all users connected to the network. If another person adds a device to that switch then the bandwidth will be shared. You will hardly ...


0

The presence of the splitter and the stub of cable for the "middle" jack will screw up the electrical/noise characteristics of the line, causing signal integrity problems that may result in anywhere from degraded performance, occasional dropped frames, or just not working at all. 10/100/1000BASE-T Ethernet is not designed to be a bus with mid-span taps ...


0

You should not use a splitter. I don't even think that would work. You should buy a 5 port switch or at the very least a 5 port hub.


0

You do not need to share your internet connection for the goal you are trying to accomplish. Do the following (for now for testing): Connect all machines to the existing wireless network. Do not configure internet sharing Set the wireless adapters to use DHCP (like your primary computer is using to get on the network/access the internet) On your first ...


0

Why are you trying to share the internet connection via one system when you can directly connect those devices to your router? I think you should set your router to dynamic IP that way, any device trying to get access to the internet, will be allocated an IP by the router and everything should work fine... And the homegroup has got nothing to do with sharing ...


1

UTM throughput would be the speed while "Unified Threat Management" options are enabled. Things like gateway anti-virus, web filtering, anti-spam, VPN tunnels, etc. The "UTM throughput of 24 Mbps" you're quoting seems to be specific in the Netgear specs, in that it's referring to UTM options that affect HTTP traffic specifically (content filtering, etc.). ...


2

Will it decrease your speed? Yes. Will it decrease your speed noticeably? No. Local network connections and routing are fast enough that they won't add a significant overhead.


2

If the two routers are connected through cable the answer is almost no (you pay a little overhead). But you don't need another router, an access point (or a repeater) is a better choice. Note: you must choose a different non-overlapping wireless channel for the 2nd router. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels


0

Yes it can slightly affect the speed and also it will do 2x NAT translation which can make issues, so this is not recommended. What you need to buy is a wireless access-point (AP), which doesn't have a router function (or it can be disabled). You just connect the AP to your router via cable as another computer and it will create a wifi network for you.


1

At a guess, I'd say it's a router problem. Make sure you have the latest firmware installed or try another router that is known to work.


0

Firstly you should note that doing this will expose the actuator over the Internet. As most such devices have no or very little security, this could be a massive problem to you. Having said that, it is pretty easy. Firstly you need to set up a path from the Internet to the device. This is done by configuring "forwarding" on the router. You choose an ...


0

Found this: Netgear DGN1000-100NAS N150 Wireless ADSL1+ Modem Router has a hidden menu for changing the device to Bridge Mode. By default, the modem is set to 192.168.0.1. To access the hidden menu: 192.168.0.1/setup.cgi?next_file=mode.htm OR 192.168.0.1/mode.htm


0

This issue might occur if your router and the network adapter in your PC might not work together. To work, the network adapter in your PC must use a wireless standard that is equal to or older than the router’s wireless standard. For example, if the network adapter in your PC uses the 802.11n wireless standard (also called Wireless-N) but your router uses ...


2

Following Arjan's advice, altering the settings within the router from an 802.11 b/g/n channel to a single form of the aformentioned channels (b OR g OR n) allowed all devices to gain access to the internet. Two things to note are that the singular 802.11 n channel was dysfunctional with TKIP as opposed to AES encryption; also an older usb wifi antennae was ...


3

Try a crossover cable. Make sure that your wall ports are straight thru. Nothing wrong with a hub system, as long as there is only a couple users. Basically, more users, the slower the network or if you are downloading a large file, then the other computers are going to crawl.


2

Your Router is appearing to be also a Caching DNS server (which is common these days ) once in the cache the subsequent queries (within a few hours to few days normally --depending on settings) is only needing to ask the router not go through the whole song and dance of contacting router then local ISP then possibly a more famous one like google ...


0

This is most likely a problem with the cabling at some point. Here are the most common problems I have found to cause this in my experience (without certified test results on the installation, which I presume you do not have): Improper termination of the cable to the jack/plug. Physical problem with the cabling, often the result of the cable being pulled ...


2

Gigabit Ethernet is achievable on a cat. 5e network. Without any problems (I have seen it run on cat 5 as well). This behaviour is most probably caused by a breach in some of your pairs. That's why auto-negotiation falls back to 100BaseT


1

A lot depends on what you want to do, but probably not. There are 2 reasons to do so. One is that your ISP's DNS servers are poor and in that case you are better off using OpenDNS or Google's DNS servers. The second is that you want to be able to access internal resources from both your LAN and from the Internet with the same address. Running your own DNS ...



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