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You can use whatever address space you like on the local side of a home router, with the caveat that if it conflicts with a routable address space on the Internet, you will not be able to reach that space because your router will attempt to find it locally. This is the reason that you should use RFC 1918 address spaces (10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12, or 192.168....


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The Aliexpress.com page for the battery says battery back-up for phone calls (which would use the TEL RJ-11). Can't help but think 3.6V 1500 mah is a bit light for powering WiFi. Looking a little harder you can refer to the Product Description (See PDF page 14 (Page 6)): And that specifies the battery is only for the voice connection.


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You may want to consider changing the Router's DNS configuration to a DNS Service that blocks ads networks. This way, when any device on your network loads a page (or an app) that includes ads, the DNS service will send it to the wrong place, and it won't be able to download the ad. I don't do this, so I can't recommend a specific ad blocking DNS service. ...


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Since you don’t mention your router’s make and model, here’s the general idea: A consumer-grade router generally consists of a “WAN” port and a number of “LAN” ports. Most cheap router SoCs have two integrated network interfaces, one for WAN and one for LAN. Of course that doesn’t match up with the number of LAN ports—there’s a built-in switch. In most ...


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Yes, that should work – some Wi-Fi APs can work in client (station) mode, although I've seen it more often in dedicated APs ("range extenders") than in combo "wireless routers". Though OpenWRT should allow it in a wi-fi router as well. (I've once used a spare laptop this way.) Though, as mentioned in comments, this will only give you a private LAN, but not ...


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Your setup seems correct. Outside of that there are three main points worth investigating: Is there a service listening on port 9987? I gather you're setting up a teamspeak server, so ensure that one is up and running Is there a firewall running? If so, you may need to add a rule to open port 9987. Are you sure only UDP is required, and not TCP as well? ...


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The wireless network password, as evidenced by the term, is used to gain access to the wireless network. To be able to connect to a wireless network, you have to be in range of it physically. Just having the network password won't give the attacker access to your router's management UI. The attacker could, however, conceivably leave a physical device ...


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From what I've seen, WD Cloud is like any typical NAS storage that anyone would use. You would access it like any other network drive on your network. The speed for home network access could be up to 1 Gbps. As far as the cloud feature, it seems like you're able to access your drive from the Internet through their WD My Cloud app. I initially thought the ...


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Assuming you are home, and your MyCloud device is connected to your local network, you won't need to download your files from the internet, only access them over your local network. Local speed determined mostly by hardware, more specifically, it can only be as fast as the slowest part of the connection. There are a lot of factors at play here: The read/...


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No the person would have to be within range of your router to connect to it. Yes you should change your router password as soon as you can. They can possibly intercept your traffic if it isn't encrypted but the chance of that is low. No they can't see what you do online. HTTPS is secure yes. They would need some kind of keylogger to capture what you do ...


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It is important to note, your Wifi password to connect to the network is different than the password to connect to the Router settings. They will have to be within a certain distance to use your Wifi. If you have something serving up a VPN within your network, they would have to know or have changed/created some login credentials to use that. I doubt they ...


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What should I worry about if my Router's password was leaked? "If someone knows my wifi password (be it WEP or WPA) what can they see on my screen? Do they just see URLs I visit, or can they see everything in my browser,....or can they see everything I do on my computer? Does using HTTPS make any difference?" They can't see anything on your ...


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let me answer your question. they will have to be within wireless range of your router to connect to it. some routers allow acces via the " wan " ip adress. this can usually turned off. the user who has acces to your network. might be able to login to the router/modem and make these changes getting a VPN connection running to your router/modem will most ...


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If someone knows your wifi password then they can connect a device to your wireless network and use your Internet/LAN - the repercussions here are that they could potentially cause havoc for your LAN. If the router admin GUI password is not known by this person then they cannot log in to your router to make any changes to how the router functions (including ...


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I want to update the great answer above You may want to look into your router and check if it has manual DNS entry support. If so you can just add your local 192.168.1.22 address on it as printer.home Otherwise you're limited with local hosts file editing or your own DNS server setup I afraid.


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I have the same router and problem. In my case, it was wife's Samsung S4 that was taking down the network. Several other devices connected without issue including my cell phone, but for some reason her phone crashed the network when she connected to the Wi-Fi network. We tried many things which did not work, and in our case the solution was to create a Guest ...


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A modem is provided by the Internet Service Provider (ISP) and provides a network access to the internet. A router is the "traffic director" of a network. It takes information provided by the modem or ONT and routes it to the various devices that are connected, and creates internal IP address for the devices so they can be accessed. A switch is used to ...


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Can you please suggest any pointers, terms that i need to look at or any other suggestion. If you want to pass on Layer 2 network traffic, which is essentially what a switch accomplishes, then the generic term for this is called "bridging". (Well, a switch may be a bit more complicated than a bridge, thanks to using CAM tables.) I would expect a Linux ...


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It was not stated clearly enough, but I assume the question is how to monitor or limit the access to router configuration, not to Wi-Fi. Is any of this possible? Yes, in general. I guess tricks like these may be easier with alternative firmware (like dd-wrt, OpenWRT -- I have some experience with the latter) than with the original one. With alternative ...


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Machines connected over WiFi and Ethernet can communicate with each other if the IGMP Proxy is disabled. The IGMP Proxy can be disabled from http://192.168.1.1/index.cgi?active_page=6059 (assuming the router's IP address is 192.168.1.1). Source: https://forums.verizon.com/t5/Fios-Internet/Communication-between-wired-and-wireless-network-on-actiontec/m-p/...


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I can answer your latter question about Git-like passwordless public key authentication. Many Wi-Fi access points (wireless routers) support IEEE 802.1X authentication, often as part of a bigger set of security protocols known as WPA2 Enterprise. 802.1X allows unique per-user login credentials. Typically these credentials are checked by a separate ...


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In addition to Yamakaja's answer, this is how you setup a local DNS server. First, you need a computer you want to run the DNS server on. This can be one of your normal computers (if they run Linux and are on most of the time) or for example a Raspberry Pi. The advantage of such a device are it's cheap, does not need much power and it's small. Setting up ...


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I think some of the answers may have been a bit confusing with their use of the terms "router" and "modem", probably based on your question's unclear use of the word "router". If your "router" was provided by your ISP, and it is the only box given to you by them, connected to a coaxial cable coming into your house, and you still have Wi-Fi, then it is a ...


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The answer is "It depends, but probably not". If by WIFI you mean "Internet Access", and they don't have Internet themselves, the answer is "No". Briefly speaking, there is equipment on the other end which needs to be enabled on a per line basis - it will not be enabled on their line. If they already have Internet, but no WIFI then * If they use the same ...


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If your friend does not have an existing connection to his/her house, then no you cannot just take your router and plug your equipment in. The modem/router is just an interface that enables your devices to utilise the internet connection coming to your house, it itself is not the device that brings internet to your house. If however, your friend already has ...


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If you have a network and want those connected to the network to autoconfigure, you probably want to set up a DHCP, which assigns IP addresses to the clients. In addition to simply assigning IP addresses, the DHCP protocol can also transfer information about which DNS servers to use. So you probably have computer X in your network that has your website. On ...


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If you’re going to run a DNS service, you might as well move the DHCP service away from the router, too. That way, no manual client-side configuration is required. I recommend using Dnsmasq, an all-in-one solution for SOHO networks. It provides both DHCP and DNS services and is very easy to set up. It requires very little resources, so you could run it on a ...


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I personally use powerDNS to do similar things to this on my own network. It runs on a linux (debian) based pc that is on all the time and servers as my local network's dns server as well as other functions (e.g. file server). Then on my router I configured a firewall rule that allowed outgoing dns traffic from my dns server pc but redirect all other ...


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Refer to these images. ipconfig: tracert:


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You should try these steps to configure your design network model: Config AKNW_M modem to connect aDSL, then enable [DHCP server] on this device, following subnet 10.0.0.xxx. Connect WLAN Extender A, WLAN Extender B & TV-Box to AKNW_M LAN port. You can use a layer 2 (normal) switch to extend AKNW_M LAN port for future use. Connect AKNW_R to AKNW_M LAN ...


4

Yes it is, and there are two (or more?) options: Editing your hosts file (the lazy way) Depending on your operating system you will have to add an entry to your "hosts" file. You can find it at /etc/hosts on most Unixoids and in C:\Windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts on Windows. To add your entry go to the bottom of the file and add a row in this format: ...


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What you're seeing is normal. The file data is kept in RAM just in case it's needed again. If more free RAM is needed, the cache will just be discarded.


-1

The problem is that router Y does not need the FORWARD chain to reach your internal network. Its WAN interface is 192.168.1.18 and so any packets bound for 192.168.1.0/24 that hit this interface will be routed locally without ever hitting FORWARD. I expect if you change FORWARD to INPUT on your second rule, things will start working as you intend: iptables ...


1

The other answers are good, but complex. Here is a simple one. ADSL is using an analog carrier to encode a digital signal. AN ADSL device includes a Modem (but a much faster and more complex one then the old dial-up ones) - the input to the modem on the sending side is digital, the modem converts it to analog, the remote side converts it back to digital. ...


2

It depends on your network diagram. A simplest network configuration—a computer linked directly to a modem which is in turn linked through a phone line/cable/fiber optic uplink to the individual’s internet service provider. In this case, you don't need a router, but you can not access the internet with a Wi-Fi device. This situation is only advisable for ...


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Yes. The router is the component that connects two different networks (your local area network or LSN and the internet). The switch only handles connections within the LAN while the modem translates the signals through the air or wires.


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Is DSL digital or analogue? The various flavors of xDSL, or Digital Subscriber Line, all employ sophisticated digital signal processing to transmit digital information over twisted-pair wires. Such signals are simply called "digital" signals for convenience. However this is an analog world (unless you're studing sub-atomic particles, where quantum physics ...


-2

Generally when you refer to ADSL. As the acronym states it is called Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line. Which would makes DSL a digital connection. It is quite funny that your voice service uses the same network as your ADSL but one is Digital and the other Analogue. But in the end DSL is digital.


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Go to device manager to update the old software. Open run and type devmgmt.msc to open device manager, then right click your wifi driver and update it if update also din't work then uninstall it and install the correct driver. Tell me your laptop model so that i can check and give you the correct driver for your wifi. Get back if you need more information....


1

The WiFi portion of your WiFi router is probably not necessary, but in your case a router is in most cases to allow for security, firewalling, and basic network services such as DHCP and perhaps DNS caching. You probably need more horsepower, how much would vary on the number of devices, speed of your internet, and how you use your network. At first glance ...


2

If you got that setup to work properly, you'd have a very insecure network as all of the computers would have to be directly linked to the internet to work, (public IPs). However that might get costly as the costs for public IPs can get expensive. The simple solution here would be to just go and buy a router and replace the one you don't want. You could ...


4

Yes and no. The router provides a local network, and distributes local IP addresses to all the computers connected to it, while only using 1 external IP provided by your ISP. Without the router, that switch is going to try to give each PC on the network, it's own external facing IP address. I doubt it will work out well for you since I'm sure your ISP would ...


1

The openVPN IP address must be different from your home network's IP range, otherwise you will get in trouble. On the other hand, the openVPN IP address will only be used between the openVPN server and the connecting device, e. g. your laptop. So your laptop might be assigned 10.8.0.2, and your openVPN server has 10.8.0.1. Both IP addresses (basically) only ...


1

You can use nmap for this, by targeting scanme.nmap.org using a full range of ports. nmap -Pn -p 1-65535 scanme.nmap.org More on this topic here: https://hackertarget.com/egress-firewall-test/ Since you are on OSX you can get nmap here: https://nmap.org/book/inst-macosx.html Be aware however, that this practice may violate policies on the LAN you are ...


1

There is no need for a VPN in this case. You may have some routing to configure on 192.168.2.x. You may also need to configure forwarding on the DD-WRT router to ensure you are not masquerading traffic. Devices on 192.168.2.x are likely routing to your main router. It likely won't know to send addresses in the 192.168.2.x range to the DD-WRT router. I ...


2

Yes, that's how routers work in the first place. On the first router, you need to add a route for 192.168.3.0/24 via the second router. I don't know how this translates to the thousand different fancy web UIs, but typically it'd look like this: NETWORK PREFIX (or NETMASK) GATEWAY ----------- ------------------------- ----------- 192.168.3....


1

All signal is inherently analog when traversing its media. That's a fundamental of reality. This implies that any given signal could be placed in a media like air where vibrations propagate the signal. Since you don't care what he signal is, only whether any arbitrary signal (or multiplexed set thereof) could be audible, the idea of digitally encoded data or ...


0

Based on the OP's spec, the Repeater bridge offers wired and wireless connectivity at the remote router and maintain all devices on the same LAN https://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Repeater_Bridge


2

Analog modems use sound to encode data, but digital communications do not. Fiber uses light, and all the examples of what you want to hear are above 1 MHz, well above the level of human hearing.


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It dosen't sound like anything. The oldschool modems were a workaround - In the US and some other countries, they used acoustic couplers which were restricted to 1200bps and were literally a device that fitted over your phone. Most proper standalone modems did not work that way. I'm assuming we're talking proper modems when talking about dialup. I for one ...



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