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If both the modem and the Raspberry Pi are on the same logical network (e.g. no NAT or routing is involved) then your Raspberry Pi cannot act as a gateway, because it is inside the only network available, and the actual gateway is your modem. This is the case if your modem has an address (say 192.168.1.1/24) and your RPi/computers an address in the same ...


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In some networks , there are some hosts that need to have fixed IPs addresses , say for example : a server , printer...etc which will facilitate the access to them for users and applications , and in order for your network to use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) which attribute IPS to hosts) and for those fixed hosts to use a fixed IP , there ...


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"DHCP address reservation" specifically means that the router will always offer the given address whenever the host asks for one using the DHCP auto-configuration protocol. However, only DHCP offers were made static, but the router's IP→MAC neighbour cache (aka the ARP cache) is still filled in dynamically using ARP. Meaning, if you bypass DHCP and ...


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Here is a great document on manually configuring a split tunnel on the system's side (if it's possible). You can control where your Windows PC sends it's traffic by creating routing rules on your system, and specifically controlling the interfaces that traffic to certain IP ranges leaves through. This is probably the best way to accomplish your goal without ...


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I think this is a routing question. mount_smbfs will let FreeBSD decide which IP and Interface to use. From your question I get that em0 and em2 are both in the same subnet as the target 10.1.1.20? If this is the case you could change the interface metric of em0 to be higher than em2. FreeBSD will then choose em2 for outbound connections to this subnet. This ...


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The issue is that the next hope or gateway in routes need to be on the same network as the one you are connected to. ie. you can set your default route to use 192.168.11.18. In turn that system will then know how to get to the 172.16.x.x network.


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Alright I managed to do it. I added an iptable rule on my linux server: iptables -t nat -A OUTPUT -d [external ip] -p all -j DNAT --to-destination [server local ip]


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No you can't change gateway per-application. (at least none that I know of) But if your router supports, you can perform QoS on certain applications you want to give preferences. I've worked with something like that long time ago and you should find it under administration section of your router configuration application.


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The 3rd command is trying to add a route with specific settings. The route already exists. Given that, the obvious option would be to change the existing route to use the same specific settings. Use netsh interface ipv6 set route ... publish=yes to do so.


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General topology discovery may be done via Address Resolution Protocol (ARP, IPv4) or Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP, IPv6). You may be familiar with broadcast addresses in a TCP/IP subnet, by convention the last available address in your subnet. For example in 192.168.1.0/24, the broadcast address is by convention (but not always by configuration) ...



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