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Old question, but... IndieVolume works for this purpose on 32-bit Windows OSes (XP, Vista, 7 at least) CheVolume works on 32 and 64-bit Win7+ I'm still looking for more of these... CheVolume has some issues (Massive UI latency, inability to easily mute all devices), but may be the only audio-output-selector which works on Windows x64


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All linux routing is done via routing tables. A default installation without any modifications will have a "main" table, a "default" table and a "local" table. The "main" table is shown if you run ip route show without additional options; the "local" table is for the loopback addresses (127.0.0.0/8, ff00::/8). The "default" table is used as a last resort ...


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From this two points: "...from the 192.168.0.x segment, I can ping devices directly on the 192.168.1.x segment [...] Devices on the 192.168.1.x segment can't ping devices on the 192.168.0.x segment..." "...the printer [...] only devices on segment 192.168.1.x are able to print to it..." I bet your secondary router is applying NAT-translation between WAN ...


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Check with your organization's IT staff if your organization has a VPN in place. A VPN will allow you to connect to your work network and your remote devices will appear as if they are connected to your organizations internal network. This will allow you to access the journals from anywhere. Another possibility would be a remote interface to your work ...


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The proper ways of doing that are: VPN: Just like explained by Keltari, this will enable you not only access your Journal site but also other resources at your working place. Proxy: With a proxy server, you will be able to access your Journals but it will only affect your browsing traffic. Moreover, it can be configured to only use the Journal site via ...


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Assuming your internal network is like 10.0.0.0/8 with gateway 10.0.0.1 on eth1 and your external default gateway is on eth1 with IP a.b.c.d, this should do it: route change default -interface en0 route add -net 10.0.0.0 -netmask 255.0.0.0 -interface en1 you can also setup these in your network scripts (you can do it in Linux - not sure about Mac), see ...


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Each line in the mtr output is the return time of a different packet that was sent. It's not the same packet that went to host 1 and then host 2. So, the answer is just that host 2 answers faster than host 1. Obviously the network transit time to 2 has to be longer because the packet has to go through host 1 first, but the total response time for host 1 ...


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You did not specify how you configured MR3020 router, but it seems like the WAN interface will connect to your USR router wirelessly. In this case, you have to put your MR3020 router and IP cameras to a different subnet (i.e. 192.168.2.*). Then you can setup port forwarding on your MR3020 to forward specific ports to each camera individually. The WAN port ...


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On R2 (your tomato router) goto Administration -> Scripts in the menu on the left of the admin page. Add the following line and save. /usr/sbin/iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o br0 -j MASQUERADE /usr/sbin/iptables -A FORWARD -i vlan1 -o br0 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT /usr/sbin/iptables -A FORWARD -i br0 -o vlan1 -j ACCEPT ...



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