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15

It sounds like RSI. Google suggests to do the following: Breaks should be taken every 30-45 minutes for at least 5 minutes. If you need assistance there are free downloadable timers that will help remind you to do so. Stretch your arms, hands, neck, and back during breaks. This yoga site demonstrates some exercises. Other sites are listed below. ...


10

I taught myself to be ambidextrous with a mouse (ambi-mouse-trous?). That way I can give one arm a rest for a while. I also use a book or two to elevate my forearm to keep a straight line through forearm-wrist-hand. Don't rest your wrists on the desk. If you must, then get some gel-filled wrist pads for both keyboard and mouse. Edit: I also have some ...


8

I use to have issues with my wrists and forarm. My main issues were with my mouse forarm, wrist and pinky finger. Replaced my mouse and keyboard to the following and it went away in a few weeks and I haven't had really any issues in almost 2 years. Mouse: Evoluent VerticalMouse Keyboard: Microsoft Natural Erognomic Keyboard 4000 You get use to the mouse ...


7

The solution is to take breaks every 30min and do a small 1min exercise program that moves the parts of the body that you have problem with. (There are some god software that can interrupt you at those intervals so you dont forget) Secondly get a trackball as a complement to your mouse, so you can switch back and forth between the mouse and the trackball. ...


7

In my experience with - still - moderate RSI in the right hand and shoulder, changing devices regularly helps. The productivity you lose for having to adjust for a couple hours to a new keyboard or mouse is more than offset by the health gains. As mice go, I use a combination of the following. As soon as I feel some pain settling in, I don't wait and plug ...


6

In addition to @joshhunt's suggestions, review your mouse and keyboard setup. Ideally, you want your keyboard positioned so that you wrists aren't bent. A good ergonomic keyboard will help. (And despite not being a fan of Microsoft software, their ergonomic keyboards are pretty good, although their mice suck for lefties) Learn keyboard shortcuts. You'd ...


6

Dont worry about compiling just download the latest installer from http://sourceforge.net/projects/workrave/files/ Try to install workrave, type the following command under Debian / Ubuntu Linux, enter: sudo apt-get install workrave Workrave works as an applet - a small application whose user interface resides within a panel. You need to add workrave to ...


5

The right answer is to ask a doctor. I've found using the Microsoft Natural Wireless Laser Mouse 6000 in combination with the Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 (that others have mentioned) help a lot to reduce pain. My doctor recommended to me that I do more weight training in general (but no pushups, as they strain the wrists), to build more ...


5

Using a Powerball is a good exercise to train your wrist muscles, so that they can endure more. Off course, the gadgets named in the other answers like: ergonomical mouse pads, great for reducing the strain on your wrist ergonomical shaped mouses, great for altering your position, but if you use those just as long as your normal mouse, you strain ...


5

Many good suggestions here. One important thing to do however, in addition to get a good mouse alternative of course, is to learn hotkeys and use your keyboard as much as possible. Will save your hand and arm a lot of work, and most likely speed up things as well =)


5

the best choice for you would be probably Workrave


4

I don't work for Kensington, but if I did I'd say the same thing: the Kensington Expert Mouse, which is really a poorly-named trackball, is great for RSI. Your hand is opened up completely and is changing position (dynamically) all the time. It's like gymnastics for your hand. Also, you have a scroll-ring that you spin. Plus it's fun and reminds you of ...


4

Pen tablets Wacom claims they help against RSI. The technology is very mature and wacom produces really good tablets. Yet it is not the same as using a trackball or a mouse. My main problem is, that you have to lay down and pick up the pen whenever you're switching to the keyboard which slows you down when you have to switch often (like when revising a ...


4

You may want to make sure that you stay hydrated. I know, it seems counterintuitive, but I found that whenever I've had bad wrist pain I've been dehydrated, and getting hyrdrated fixes the problem. My chiropractor suggested that to me, and I found that at least one book written by an expert from mainstream medicine on carpal tunnel/RSI have said the same.


4

The following program worked for me, try it out, hope will be helpful for you! Best of luck! EitherMouse 0.4 - auto switch mouse buttons on second mouse


3

You could use PTH Pasteboard Pro and set up any hot key you want in its preference pane. I tested this by setting Control-Delete to paste.


3

You can use 20 Cubed or Timout for example. There is also an app called "Be Healthy" and iRest. I just use 20 Cubed and Timout, they're pretty cool.


2

Unless your mouse has some proprietary drivers/apps that let you reconfigure the buttons to whatever you want, you can't do it from Windows alone. As you already found, the Windows Mouse properties window applies to all plugged-in and recognized pointing devices. Collectively they will share one cursor and set of behaviors (double-click speed, appearance, ...


2

Remap Copy and Paste shortcuts on a Mac you just remap it to something else..


2

I know several people with RSI that like the thumb trackballs like the Logitech Trackman. There is also a cordless version. Your hand doesn't have to move at all to use it.


2

A great mouse alternative I use (I'm a computer scientist): http://www.naturalpoint.com/smartnav/ Works great even with "big" setup such as mine: How SmartNAV works: http://www.naturalpoint.com/smartnav/products/about.html SmartNav uses an infrared (IR) camera to track your head movements. Learn more about the technology. You reflect IR light ...


2

Use a keyboard like the Comfort Keyboard Original that allows for separating the distance between your hands and allows tilting your hands toward each other so that they're held in a more natural position.


2

Does it matter if you put the mouse in front of your stomache turned 90 degree (between your stomache and the keyboard) - for a more relaxed and not so un-natural arm, wrist and elbow angles? That also makes it much faster to switch hands and use the other hand when not doing precision work - like navigating the web and so forth...


2

I switched to a Logitech Trackman Marble after carpal tunnel surgery to prevent re-occurrence. It took some time, but within two years I developed a very painful trigger thumb from using the ball. My therapist said there is no perfect pointing device, and recommended switching from one to another several times a day.


2

I had a similar problem and received this advice from my Dr... The cause was mussel fatigue from keeping my back/torso in the same position for long periods. The easiest fix is to do sit-ups/crunches and other exercises that move those mussels and those of your stomach twice a week for about 10 minutes. That and a bit of posture improvement worked like a ...


2

If you are using computer for long time per day it is always good to stand up, stretch, and make sure when you sit you are sitting upright. Back straight, and preferably your desk / mouse is level with your elbow (or just below) to ensure that your arm is level with the desk (allowing your arm to rest on the desk) Since you mentioned the pain is on the ...


2

A great mouse alternative I use (I'm a computer scientist): http://www.naturalpoint.com/smartnav/ Works great even with "big" setup such as mine: How SmartNAV works: http://www.naturalpoint.com/smartnav/products/about.html SmartNav uses an infrared (IR) camera to track your head movements. Learn more about the technology. You reflect IR light ...


2

I have bad repetitive stress injuries in my right wrist; switching to a handshake grip mouse (I like the Evoulent VerticalMouse3) has helped quite a bit! Other than that, Josh and Chris are right on the ball. Take frequent breaks, make sure your workstation is set up properly, and see a doctor. There are lots of different exercises you can do to strengthen ...


2

Try a different mouse; often a large one will fix the problem, but the shape can make a difference too. If you find that you're dorsiflexing your hand, raise your chair, lower the mouse, and/or use a wrist pad to straighten the joint. If that is the problem, also find out why it's not happening when you type. Finally, consider left-handed mousing, even if ...


2

If you're worried about RSI, a trackball is definitely the way to go. They're a little difficult to get used to, but you'll notice a difference really quickly.



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