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Can I connect multiple hard disks to a single SATA slot on the motherboard? No, not directly. Your only options are to use a port multiplier or to add additional SATA or SAS connectors.


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Yes, you would see a difference. The seek times of a SSD are very low compared to platter drives. Also, that interface transfer rate is not the actual read/write speed, which would be significantly lower (likely less than 100MB/sec)


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As noted before, the hitachi will be hard pressed to go over 100MB/s in practical terms. All that "SATA3" labeling in HDDs is just affirming compatibility with the technology. The disks are as fast/slow as before. There are very few SSDs in the affordable range that can fully use the SATA3 6gig bandwidth. A cheap SSD drive may have a mediocre sequential ...


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As SATA is a point to point serial system you are unlikely to be able to branch or split from a single connect - your better bet is probably to fine a spare PCI slot and fit another SATA card this will give you more connectors and should have little or no speed impact.


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I have this same problem - found the a 500 watt replacement on ebay 231267206305 for $99. Appears to be the exact replacement. I think it should be a good one since it is 80 gold rated. Anyways my oldest son is going to buy it and upgrade his unit to a newer Geforce model. Will report back.


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SATA and SCSI are using low voltage differential signaling for data transmission, which means they should tolerate even high ground offsets. IDE/PATA doesn't use this, so it should be much more sensitive to bad ground. That said, I would avoid doing this, or at least make sure everything is properly grounded.


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If you created a partition directly from Windows installation disk, then you have a 100 MB boot drive, then you can't change your primary drive, even you can't clone your windows. windows disk manager doesn't show small partition, you should use a external bootable software like Acronis Disk Director if you want to see all partitions and Disks. and if you ...


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Let's start with the theoretical answer. USB 3.0 has a higher (with SuperSpeed much higher) potential throughput, so it should have a fundamental advantage. However, in most cases the drives you are plugging into USB 3.0 ports are actually SATA drives at heart with an external case and are therefore either translating the data or encapsulating the data for ...



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