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Depending how you use your computer, you may cause tiny amounts of data to be transferred to or from the drive (actually the cache attached to the drive) many, many times per second, so if you are doing some task that does thousands of tiny transactions with the drive per second you will save fractions of a second many times per second. Over the course of a ...


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The answer to your question may depend quite a bit on the software embedded/provided with that card (even changing from one revision/update to the next). I'd make sure to have a relevant number of SCRATCH DRIVES to play with, then try it out with them: build knowledge suitable for the situation at hand.


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Your hard drive might be out of alignment. If you have a drive with 4k sectors, but it is still using 512k sectors, you may experience slow downs. Check if the drive is a 4k drive (all drives manufactured since January 2011 will be), and verify it is formatted with 4k sectors. Here is additional information on how to investigate further. ...


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It really supports any SATA version I, II, or III. The SATA drives and are backwards compatible. If the drive is SATA III and your MB Pro is SATA II, the dive will perform at the theoretical levels of a SATA II drive. Same for SATA I.


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You can take a look at the Link Speed under the Intel 5 Series Chipset section. SATA levels are named after a number (1, 2, 3) and also for their speeds. SATA 1.0 is known as SATA 1.5Gb/s SATA 2.0 is known as SATA 3.0Gb/s === You're computer supports SATA 2.0 SATA 3.0 is known as SATA 6.0Gb/s "Link speeds are the theoretical maximum speed at which data ...


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I could not find the description on Apple site, but according macforum and wikipedia it goes with SATA 3, so go for this. However if you already have SATA 2 drive - it will work too. Here is a simple table which shows how the mixing of SATA II and SATA III devices at the same bus results: SATA 2 + SATA 3 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 2 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 3 ...


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Your Macbook would at least support SATA II speeds, and would still provide you with a speed boost over a traditional mechanical drive in terms of loading times. Also, SATA II ports are compatible with SATA III drives so there shouldn't be any hardware compatibility issues.


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I realize this is an older thread from almost two years ago, but I will chip in my two cents anyway. I recently bought an HP StorageWorks MSA 70 Enclosure which supports up to 25 2.5" SAS or SATA hard disks (the same as the ones from your laptops). I also bought an "LSI Logic 9200-8e 8-ports SAS Controller" to be able to connect the enclosure to my ...


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You can replace the Harddisk by an SSD in almost any iMac. I did it on my old 2009 iMac 24. Like you mentioned, you can also remove the Optical Drive and add a second Harddisk (or your SSD). You have the choice - they are both connected via standard SATA cables (maybe check if they are both SATA-3 compatible for the maximum speed). The best guide for ...


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Here is a simple table which shows how the mixing of SATA II and SATA III devices at the same bus results: SATA 2 + SATA 3 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 2 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 3 = SATA 3 So does it have a sense to install SATA 3 SSD on SATA 2 notebook? A bit broad questions because it depends on circumstances. It hardly has a sense from the performance ...


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Can I connect multiple hard disks to a single SATA slot on the motherboard? No, not directly. Your only options are to use a port multiplier or to add additional SATA or SAS connectors.


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As SATA is a point to point serial system you are unlikely to be able to branch or split from a single connect - your better bet is probably to fine a spare PCI slot and fit another SATA card this will give you more connectors and should have little or no speed impact.


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If the disk is in your device manager all you need to do is go to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management > Disk Management. check if it has a letter e.g (G:) etc.


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As noted before, the hitachi will be hard pressed to go over 100MB/s in practical terms. All that "SATA3" labeling in HDDs is just affirming compatibility with the technology. The disks are as fast/slow as before. There are very few SSDs in the affordable range that can fully use the SATA3 6gig bandwidth. A cheap SSD drive may have a mediocre sequential ...


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Yes, you would see a difference. The seek times of a SSD are very low compared to platter drives. Also, that interface transfer rate is not the actual read/write speed, which would be significantly lower (likely less than 100MB/sec)


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Let's start with the theoretical answer. USB 3.0 has a higher (with SuperSpeed much higher) potential throughput, so it should have a fundamental advantage. However, in most cases the drives you are plugging into USB 3.0 ports are actually SATA drives at heart with an external case and are therefore either translating the data or encapsulating the data for ...


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If you created a partition directly from Windows installation disk, then you have a 100 MB boot drive, then you can't change your primary drive, even you can't clone your windows. windows disk manager doesn't show small partition, you should use a external bootable software like Acronis Disk Director if you want to see all partitions and Disks. and if you ...


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If you are using the same cables it was using in the old machine, you could try to swap them. If that doesn't solve your problem, the you most likely have an issue with the connector on the drive. You could refurbish the drive yourself if you're handy, but I would probably just go out and buy a new one.



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