New answers tagged

0

Keep in mind that different implementations such as on your "IBM Server" may act differently. Without knowing the exact model of your server there's no guarantee the controller will work exactly like this. As a rule you want to keep the same size and model of disk within a RAID 5 array. Your controller should allow a 1TB drive to be added, but it's only ...


-1

On windows, you can use smartmontools, which for years can see smart attributes and run tests on individual drives, even if they are members of intel fake-raid. The easiest installer is at http://www.netpower.fr/smartmontools-win which lets you setup email warnings, pop-ups, etc.


2

It'll work. Sata's fairly standard, backward and forward compatible, and that's a newish adaptor. The pinout hasn't really changed, nor has the protocol. The signalling speeds for sata 2 and 3 are better, sure, but chances are USB will be the bottleneck


3

Your SATA controller on your laptop is part of the motherboard. Yes, your new SSD will work, but at SATA-II speeds (3 gbps). I have run SSDs in SATA-II ports before and although you do not get the full SATA-III experience (6 gbps), they are still faster and more reliable than traditional hard drives.


0

IN most of the cases in it a problem either with magnet heads (assembly). Heads mounted on Head Stack Assembly or HSA. When the computer starts up during the POST procedure HDD is initialized (firmware, size, parameters, mode, interface) and reported to BIOS. During this phase HSA goes off the landing zone (where is it parked) and the heads are reading ...


-1

Interesting. I believe your Windows thinks that is the system drive and won't let you change the letter because of it. You could try accessing it from Linux (by using SystemRescueCD, for example) and removing the active flag from that partition. Then, try mounting it same way you tried the first time. If you remove the active flag, you won't be able too ...


-1

I tried to do this to install win 7 on a 3.5 drive in order to be able to put it on a SD card with WinToUSB. Seems not to necessary for that purpose though :) You need a power supply from an old desktop (cheapest and easiest) and a male to female SATA cable. If the power supply is from a really old pc get a IDE to SATA power converter. That is from 4pin ...


2

SATA connectors have 3.3v, 5v, and 12v connectors. Even though 3.3v is not commonly used, USB only supplies 5v. Even if you went with USB 3.1 with its 3A, Hard drives draw 12 Volts @ ~1 Amp and 5 Volts @ ~1 Amp when idle so ~17 Watts when idle. USB 3.1 supports up to 5v3A or ~15 Watts so even if you built an active converter, it would not work, even at idle. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included