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0

I know it isn't worth an answer. You want to edit the photo like this: Of-course, it isn't perfect, just a sample. I use GIMP(for windows) to edit the picture. One thing is worth mention here, if you have images of this kind( You have metioned in the question that the pictures are scanned, but the image given is not a scanned image! As far as I know, a ...


2

I have the V37 scanner, which is the same as yours except it lacks the transparency adapter. Your question aroused my curiosity and led to a number of interesting findings. The few times I had previously ventured into 4800 dpi was for microscopic analysis using a previous scanner. That experience was tack-sharp results. My V30 had been used only for ...


0

Solution for Adobe acrobat X: Open your (.Pdf)-Document Go to [file] > [Print]. See [Figure_1] Choose as Printer [Adobe PDF] - Leave the configuration as it is. See [Figure_2] Select [Page set up]. See [Figure_2] Choose paper size see [Figure_3] PS. I prepared a tutorial, but it's subordinated to a: "need at least 10 reputation to post images". So i was ...


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My trick is to scan the images to a losslessly compressed format (tiff + compression). This way, blank pages have a much lower file size and I can detect them with find, move them to another directory, check them quickly with a viewer and then get rid of them.


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On the other hand, there are situations where the scan itself at higher bits could be useful. When there is very little available contrast or range on the scanned materials. In my experience the usual consumer scanners do not have any real adjustments in the hardware, for adjusting color , contrast, sensitivity, or lighting. All the adjustments are done ...


5

To answer how many bits of color depth you need and how it affects your results, let me start with a quick explanation of what color depth actually is. What is color depth? Color depth describes how many shades of color will be stored. If an image has extremely fine gradations of a color, scanning and storing an extremely high number of colors means that ...


6

I want to suck out the highest quality from that scanner, but is there a point in scanning white paper with black ink at such a high color depth such as the 48-bit that is the max on my scanner? The shorter answer about color depth, DPI and document scanning: In short? There is 100% no valid reason to scan white paper with black ink at such a high ...


1

As you reduce the bit quality, you'll begin to introduce artifacts as the system has to approximate color values. This will become noticeable at very low bit depths, such as 2- or 4-bit scans. For example, a 2-bit scan means every pixel must be pure black or pure white. A large crease in the paper might render as a black line across the image, and even the ...


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You might have a chance to reach your failure rate of below perhaps 0.25% with less time and effort as in my answer above and within the budget of 500 GBP, which you mentioned in your parallel question, as follows: There are companies that rent out professional scanners, sometimes including a computer with additional professional scan and/or ...


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Assuming that you intend to continue scanning incoming documents on a regular basis (if you only plan to scan old ones you better get it done at a scan service anyway): Scan profiles, some scanner producers call it scan presets, will make your work much easier and faster. With a profile/preset you save a combination of scanner driver settings for later ...


1

To reduce your error rate with very diverse documents (as you stated in What features are important in a scanner + sheet feeder for old personal documents): (A) The "simple" answer: 1. Sort your documents into batches of equal document characteristics. 2. For each batch do test scans with varying scanner driver settings. Do this until you find a ...



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