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2

Based on this review of the phone, the LG VX8100 allowed a miniSD card for expansion of up to 1GB. Looks like the phone only knew how to address the first 1GB of data, so it probably created the partition as far as it could and left the rest untouched. As for the boot flag, I would guess that it was either a quirk of the way the phone used the card, or ...


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Expanding upon William's answer, one could calculate the end of the last partition using fdisk and a calculator: $ fdisk -l /dev/mmcblk0 Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 7.4 GiB, 7948206080 bytes, 15523840 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disklabel type: ...


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You seem to have a 64GB card, which is necessarily SDXC. I cannot find the specification of the card reader on the Chromebook, but I suspect it may be only SDHC, with a size limit of 32GB. I can't be completely sure, because I have never plugged an SDXC card into an SDHC reader, so I don't know if you can see any of its file system when you do. You have two ...


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Even tough you explicitly asked about "...copy and write a partition table..." I think you really want: to clone your gold-master image to other brand new, identical, SD-cards: to avoid "dd-ing" the whole 8GB source sd-card, as it contains only 300 MB of data. In such a case there are alternatives to "dd", that can do exactly what you need: disk-cloning, ...


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(A duplicate of http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/12986/how-to-copy-the-partition-layout-of-a-whole-disk-using-standard-tools) I personally prefer not to use dd to avoid duplicating UUIDs. Use sfdisk: -d, --dump Dump the partitions of a device in a format that is usable as input to sfdisk. For example, % sfdisk -d ...


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You are trying to mount the SD card via exfat: sudo mount -t exfat /dev/sdc1 /media/sdcard But to my knowledge, most camera SD cards are DOS formatted. So you would use a command like this to view contents: sudo mount -t msdos /dev/sdc1 /media/sdcard I believe the reason you can mount the SD card with exfat but can’t view the contents is that exfat ...


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You can speed dd up by increasing the block size with the bs flag. I usually use the following: dd if=/dev/source of=/dev/destination bs=8M. In all honesty, dd or parted are your best options, dd being the superior option for quality (in my opinion). 


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Sure – you can do that using dd. The MSDOS aka MBR partition table is in the first 512 bytes: head -c 512 /dev/sdb > mbr.bin cp mbr.bin /dev/sdc partprobe dd if=/dev/sde bs=512 count=1 of=mbr.bin dd if=mbr.bin of=/dev/sdf partprobe However, this will not replicate the actual filesystem structure; you will have to run mkfs on the blank partitions ...


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Using diskpart (as described here) worked for me. In a nutshell: diskpart list disk select disk (disk no) clean create partition primary You need to be very careful at the second and third steps to make sure you've chosen the correct disk.


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BOOTICE solved my issue. You can re-partitionate anything with it. http://bbs.ipauly.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2


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BOOTICE solved my issue. You can re-partitionate anything with it. http://bbs.ipauly.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2


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You may consider following the legal route instead of the technological route. Probably the company in question has some sort of privacy statement - check it out on their website and get a written conformation (email with a person's name and function should be enough) that your data will be kept private. After that, send your microSD card, with a note ...


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Have an inspection of the write-protect tab on the SD card - to have write enabled the tab has to be closest to the gold contacts, and this sometimes gets pushed back to read only when inserted, and back to write enabled when removed. Fix the tab in place with a very small amount of strong glue, making sure you leave plenty of time to dry - tape won't work ...


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The exact layout is driver dependent, but try searching /sys for some MMC (SD) specific keywords. Below is from an ARM-based embedded system: $ find /sys -name "oemid" /sys/class/mmc_host/mmc0/mmc0:aaaa/oemid $ find /sys -name "cid" /sys/class/mmc_host/mmc0/mmc0:aaaa/cid $ find /sys -name "csd" /sys/class/mmc_host/mmc0/mmc0:aaaa/csd Bunnie's blog entry on ...


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SD cards are SSDs, it's the exact same technology, but because SD cards aren't built for the same purpose they don't include the required features like smart. There is no way to tell how long the SD card will last, because the required data isn't collected so there is no way to generate an estimate. If SD cards did have the relevant details you would use the ...


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I think this page has everything you need. instead of sdb make use of loopback device instead of actual card make use of virtual filesystem you are in the right track making use of dd to create a file for the virtual filesystem. you are in the right track using loopback device. The trick is mounting the loopback device in the offsets where the partitions ...


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It can be done with a IDE/SATA to CF adapter, but you have to consider price vs performance and lifespan against a removable or second HDD.



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