New answers tagged

0

This SD card is defective or damaged or the electrical pins are bad. Try again after cleaning them. If it still fails, then it is time for a new SD card.


1

Disc management (Windows) or disks (Debian and derivatives) will show you the usable space. There are also command-line utilities diskpart (Windows interactive program: use list disk) and sudo fdisk -l (Linux) to show the same information. If you format it with full sector checking, this will confirm that the whole space is accessible.


0

I found an answer here: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/275037-32-card-ready-boost apparently Class 4 sdmc cards will work if you have a class 10 there is a hack to make that work, open regedit, START BUTTON Search box at bottom enter REGEDIT then this path... HKEY_LOCAL-MACHINE, SOFTWARE, Microsoft, Windows NT, current version, EDMgmt ...


0

As others said, having a swap file on a RAMdisk makes no sense whatsoever, because the whole point of a swap file is to extend RAM. If you add a RAM disk you are taking away from RAM the size of the RAMDISK, and you add back the same amount of with the swapfile in the RAMDisk so the end sum is zero gain. In fact you are worse off because of the overhead of a ...


1

It might do for secondary storage, so long as you're not doing a great deal of editing on it, but I would keep a backup. SD cards lack any of the intelligence that an SSD controller has and are effectively just a dumb block of flash memory. SSDs have features like wear levelling that can prolong the life of the flash device by a great deal by preventing ...


0

Is the Drive having a physical WriteLock switch? If yes, Some drives have a write lock switch which toggles Read-Only mode preventing write access. This can compel windows into displaying the write protected message. The simple resolution is to toggle RW mode using the physical switch. or The Device might be malfunctioning In this case, prima facie, we ...


0

Back your data up off this card NOW! Due to the way the cards work they have a 'hidden' number of spaces it can rewrite data when it fails to originally write. Once this run out something like this is put it by the manufacturers to make you aware that the card is reaching the end of it's usable life. Basically instead of lying to you and letting you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included