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I have the same problem with my Windows 8.1 laptop and just about every 64GB card I own. The switch on the card is unlocked. When I write something onto the card, it appears as it should. When I safely remove it and check later, the files are gone. When I check it on a different laptop, they are gone. A Tech said he has heard (somewhere) that the larger ...


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If you can boot a Linux OS which has physical access to the SD device, you might try the following. First, be sure to identify the device. Often, you might plug your key, then run dmesg. It usually tells you something. Let's pretend it is about /dev/sdi (but be careful, a mistake could wipe all your data!; don't use /dev/sda or /dev/sdb these are probably ...


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2 things can be going on here: The information in the first sector (the MBR) is corrupted which confuses the hell out of the Operating System. This prevents normal tools to properly wipe it. It should be possible to bring it back in usable shape but you won't be able to do that in Windows. Windows doesn't know how to handle multi-partition USB-removable ...


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Did you try formatting the card from within the camera or the phone yet? Here are some how-tos: Formatting the SD card in a Nikon: http://www.wikihow.com/Format-a-Memory-Card-with-a-Nikon-D700 Formatting the SD card in an Xperia: https://support.t-mobile.com/docs/DOC-11874#sd_card


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My guess is your 3rd party device maybe doing something non standard. Maybe it skips updating certain part of the file system. It maybe ignoring errors in the volume table or MBR. Your SD card may have failed before you know it.


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Is the third-party device a Windows Phone 7 series? SD cards have security features that allow them to be locked with a key, and only a device with the right key can read/write to it (similar to the ATA security feature). Windows Phone 7, due to the way the underlying Windows CE operating system handles storage, integrates the SD card with the internal ...


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1: If your card is "locked" like you mention, you need to physically unlock it using the physical switch on the side of the card. 2: Doing a "Low-Level" format like suggested will do the trick but it's way more work than needed. You can easily re-partition the card or reset the MBR using a portable/small program like BootIce Here's how to do it: ~ Select ...


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To erase the MBR in Windows you need a Low Level Format tool like this from HDD-Guru. Now start the programm with administrator rights. Click on: Continue for free Choose your sdhc card (be sure to choose the right one) Click Continue On the tab "LOW-LEVEL-FORMAT" choose "Perform quick wipe" Click on "FORMAT THIS DEVICE" Now all Partitions on the sdhc ...


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Assuming you mean advantages over standard USB jump drives, there is no major dis/advantage seeing as how they are, more or less, the same technology. The only caveat is read/write speed. However, the same argument can be said for both. Also assuming that you connect your Micro SD's using either a SD Card card adapter (computers) or Micro USB to Micro SD ...



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