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67

First of all, the simple answer to your question: If you have an ARM tablet running Windows RT (like the Surface RT or the Asus Vivo RT), then you will not be able to disable Secure Boot or install other OSes. Like many other ARM tablets, these devices will only run the OS they come with. If you have a non-ARM computer running Windows 8 (like the Surface ...


11

The BIOS is independent from your OS. You have a BIOS on your computer, whatever Operating System(s) you install on it. To answer your question more precisely, yes you have a BIOS. To set the boot device priority, you first have to access it, which is generally done by pressing a key just after powering up your computer (or rebooting). The key depends on ...


8

What is “Secure Boot” in Windows? I think (some or all of) the following are true UEFI replaces traditional BIOS as the PC firmware that starts the boot process. UEFI has a feature called "Secure Boot" You can disable EUFI secure-boot on some computers but not all. Windows 8 for ARM (Windows RT) will not install on hardware that does not support UEFI ...


6

Firstly, you will need an EFI-booted linux system. If you still have your original install media (CD/DVD/USB stick), that should usually include an adequate rescue system. It might even have a one-click repair option :). Alternatively, the Ubuntu community provides an automatic boot-repair image. It claims to support Fedora. If you want to know what it ...


5

Machines that have the Windows 8 compatibility logo come with Secure Boot: with restrictions that by default stop the user deciding how they want to boot their computer, however on a PC (x86) you have the ability to use Custom Mode which allows you to boot into other OSes, if you are physically present and know the procedure for your particular hardware; Any ...


4

AFAIK RHEL 6 has basic support for UEFI (grub-efi, efibootmgr) with no support for Secure Boot. This means you have to turn off Secure Boot on Windows 8 logo machines if you want to install CentOS 6. I'm not aware of multiboot support for RHEL UEFI installation. Disclaimer: I did UEFI QA at Red Hat. This does not represent the official stance of Red Hat.


3

AFAIK secure boot will not allow to boot Linux, there are plans sign a bootloader which in turn would load existing bootloaders(e.g. GRUB), but it's not done yet. If you still want to enable it:


2

Secure Boot is a BIOS-level feature. It has nothing directly to do with Windows 8, but Microsoft is encouraging / forcing OEMs to support it on Windows 8 systems. If your BIOS supports Secure Boot, you can enable it whether you have Windows 8 or not. (although you probably won't want to enable it unless you have a signed OS). If your BIOS does not ...


2

I had the same problem, but found I could install Win 7 Pro if I changed the BOOT mode to "Legacy; Secure boot: OFF". Note: At the end of my install I had no network drivers loaded, so had to download these from Dell copy them across to the laptop and then perform an installation. Once installed I had network/Internet access and could complete all other ...


2

I believe you can press Esc during bootup to display a boot menu. See if the Linux CD/USB shows up there. If not, try to turn off UEFI Boot and then set the boot order in the BIOS: As far as Secure Boot goes, here's a Secure Boot bootloader for Linux in case you're interested, and the Linux Foundation should have a valid signed pre-bootloader available ...


2

If you are dual-booting with UEFI Windows, there's another possibility. which doesn't require a recovery disk. You can boot into Windows, open a command line with admin privileges, and run the following command: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\fedora\shim.efi This will replace the Windows boot entry in UEFI, with one that boots into GRUB. Assuming your ...


2

Is there a way to disable UEFI Secure Boot without entering in BIOS settings? Secure Boot is an option enabled by default on UEFI OEM systems. Its actually required, to be turned on by default with the option to disable it, to be get a Windows 8 supported sticker from Microsoft. So even if you remove the CMOS battery the default option would be to ...


2

By design, Secure Boot cannot be disabled from within an OS; you must enter your firmware's setup utility in order to disable it. With most computers, you can enter the firmware setup utility by hitting a function key, or sometimes Del, early in the boot process. Some computers don't enable the keyboard, though, or don't provide this option at all. If you've ...


2

I won't go into any controversies that surround UEFI, Secure boot or TPM in general (out of scope), so I'll try and answer as directly as possible. UEFI is (for all intents and purposes) a BIOS 'replacement' that sits at the BIOS level (between hardware and OS). UEFI Secure boot has to be supported by the firmware (BIOS); UEFI Secure boot is essentially a ...


2

I asked this Microsoft and the answer was, that they show this watermark to make sure that OEMs don't release new systems without having SecureBoot turned on.


1

I have also this problem. And i have fixed the problem You can find your answer on this link: Windows 8 to 8.1 Pro Upgrade SecureBoot Error


1

this is for anyone searching for the Launch CSM disabled (greyed out) issue (can't enable it) it's because Secure Boot is enabled in the BIOS. Disable it, then reboot and go back into BIOS and you should be able to enable Launch CSM.


1

The GPU must support the new Video Protocol from which is called Graphics Output Protocol (GOP). Disable the fastBoot option in the UEFI firmware to fix it. Now the old VGA loading is enabled.


1

You should be able to load the certificate using MokManager.efi so that it's recognized by Shim, and therefore accepted by the kernel. I don't know if Fedora sets its GRUB up so that you can launch MokManager.efi yourself. If not, try booting (with Secure Boot disabled) a USB flash drive with an EFI shell or rEFInd. You should then be able to launch ...


1

Yes, but you must have your Secure Boot keys in hand. First, be aware that there are at least three forms that Secure Boot public keys may take: .cer/.der files -- These files are used by most UEFI implementations, as well as by the MokManager tool that's paired with Shim. .crt -- These files are used natively by most Linux security tools, such as ...


1

I've never used YUMI; however, based on skimming its main Web page, it looks like it sets up SYSLINUX to boot various image files from the USB flash drive. This type of configuration would have to be re-done using an EFI version of SYSLINUX or some other EFI boot loader (such as GRUB 2). You could experiment with this yourself, but I don't know of any tool ...


1

Solution: Use a jumper connector socket to "short" the "CLR_CMOS" pins on the motherboard (this should be done according to the instructions provided by the manufacturer - typically a screwdriver can be used). Power the system down first, connect the jumper for 5 seconds or so, then disconnect again before powering up. This will bring up an option on boot to ...


1

I got it. The Linux Disc was dated. But more so, none of the bootable drives (not the USB, disc, etc. Only the HDD with Windows MBR on it) will show up in this BIOS unless there is media attached. For example, I have an 8 GB USB drive with 'Yummy' which is an OS loader and Windows 7 on it. The drive would not show up on the USB 3.0 side. But once inserted, ...


1

I had to enable "BIOS Legacy mode" in the bios itself to even install anything pre-windows 8 on MY windows 8 HP laptop... it allowed the bios to operate "legacy" style as well as uefi. A quote "UEFI, or Unified Extensible Firmware Interface, is a complete re-imagining of a computer boot environment, and as such it has almost no similarities to the PC BIOS ...


1

A malware author (let's call him Mel) can't just copy the keys from an existing boot loader; he has to get his own binary signed with a private key that's held by Microsoft. That said, Microsoft is signing binaries for third parties -- OS developers (Red Hat, Canonical, etc.) and even individuals are getting binaries signed. To do this, you've got to submit ...


1

It's possible to disable Secure Boot on computers that bear a Windows 8 logo, although the details of how to do this are not standardized. You can then install any Linux distribution that supports EFI (assuming no hardware incompatibilities, serious bugs, etc.). If you like, you can then install the shim or PreBootloader program, adjust the boot path, and ...


1

At the moment the only way to boot non-Secure-Boot media I know of is what you've discovered: Disable Secure Boot. You could just leave it disabled, but of course that slightly increases your vulnerability to security threats. (I don't happen to know offhand how many existing pieces of malware might be stopped by Secure Boot. The current threat could be ...


1

Secure boot is something baked into the UEFI bootloader (calling it a 'bios' would be inaccurate but it does the same thing) and is an option the OEM needs to enable. If your system dosen't have it already, you'd likely need a new UEFI version that supports it for your PC. You can't just turn it 'on' on an existing system, and chances are unless you buy a ...


1

Secure boot is a technology described by recent revisions of the UEFI specification; it offers the prospect of a hardware-verified, malware-free operating system and improve the security of many system deployments. The Linux Foundation has come up with a solution that should work for any and all operating systems. When Linux Foundation is able to obtain a ...



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