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3

In terms of security, three additional methods come to my mind. A: use public key authentication To add to security, you can set up your SSH server to use public key authentication. That is, either additionally to or instead of a strong password, the connection will be opened only if the SSH client provides the private key which matches the public key on ...


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There are two levels of encryption you can use in 7zip (and some other archivers, I would imagine). The first is to encrypt the actual data being stored so that you can't get that data (easily) without the key. However, in that case, you can still open the archive and view the file names (i.e., the directory hierarchy) within it. It's only once you try ...


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No, as the kernel does not provide any sort of "going to sleep" signal before freezing all processes, there is no distribution-agnostic way to detect it. That said, pretty much all suspend requests – including lid-close – tend to go through a few userspace APIs: eventually, they either call systemd-logind's Suspend() function via D-Bus, or spawn the ...


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To clarify, using a virtual machine on its own doesn't necessarily add any security. The best thing security wise about a virtual machine is that it is almost completely separate from the host machine. So if you get a virus on your host computer it probably won't be able to access anything inside the VM, and vice versa. Disk encryption, like apesa suggested, ...


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In VirtualBox you have a couple of options in terms of securing your data within a virtual Drive You can encrypt your VM disk inside VirtualBox. You must always shutdown the VM with this option and not use Sleep, Hibernate, etc... You can use a third party encryption tool to encrypt all the VM files Lastly you could encrypt the Host system Disk With all ...


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The comm field doesn't necessarily correspond to the executable name; it is freely settable by the program itself, by writing to /proc/self/comm on Linux or by using some arcane prctl()'s. On Linux, however, the accounting log seems to include not only processes but also userspace threads. (Linux processes and threads are very nearly the same, after all.) ...



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