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13

I found a useful answer here Click start → Run → type regedit and click OK button Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\COM Name Arbiter Now on the right panel, you can see the key ComDB. Right-click it and click modify In value Data section select all and delete reset to Zero (0) Its 32 bytes with 8 bits in each byte. A set bit ...


9

Run Device Manager from elevated command line: > set DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPRESENT_DEVICES=1 > devmgmt.msc Enable "Show hidden devices" in the menu, and uninstall grayed-out COM ports.


9

Hard to tell without a pic, but I'd guess its a 'DB Connector' or 'Game Port' connector. DB-15 (DA-15 and DE-15) Two DB-15 connectors are widely used. The larger, two-row female DA-15 is the game port on a PC, and the smaller, three-row, female high-density DE-15 is the VGA port. The Game Port was used for joysticks, midi devices and other ...


9

You are looking for a serial terminal server or console server. Many manufacturers make them such as Raritan, Lantronix, and Black box.


8

Portmon, from Sysinternals, will do what you need: Portmon is a utility that monitors and displays all serial and parallel port activity on a system. It has advanced filtering and search capabilities that make it a powerful tool for exploring the way Windows works, seeing how applications use ports, or tracking down problems in system or ...


8

Use a USB Serial adapter. Something like this.


7

This is caused by Windows opening the port at boot time for a very short time (under half a second). During this process, all of the serial ports are opened in order to detect input devices such the mouse. The solution is to simply tell Windows not to do this, this way you don't lose your data since it's not being received. We can do this by modifying ...


7

Go to My Computer, Properties, Advanced, Environment Variables, and make a System variable named devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices Make its value 1. Now go to device manager, view, and check Show Hidden Devices. Now expand Ports(COM & LPT). You'll see more ports than you did before. Right-click on and Uninstall whichever of the greyed-out ports you ...


7

I think it's this command: dmesg | grep tty Running that on my own Linux box (which only has 1 Serial port) produces a single ttyS0 output line. Try it on your own, you will see what I mean.


7

The original serial had 3, 5 or even 7 pins, but only one to carry the data. The three pins serial worked like this: The extra pin for a common ground is needed so that the other computer knows what to compare the data signal with. The receive and transmit lines are crossed, so that data transmitted by computer 1 is received on the receive pin in ...


7

Set tty device settings: stty -F /dev/ttyS0 9600 -parity cs8 -cstopb Send data: cat firmware.cod > /dev/ttyS0


7

The PuTTY program is not built into Linux. What the other person meant is that most Linux systems come with commands that provide the same functionality as PuTTY: The SSH client is ssh. The Telnet client is telnet. The serial console clients are screen and minicom. To connect to the first serial port using screen, run: screen /dev/ttyS0 Press CtrlA ...


6

It's pretty easy. Under Linux there are serial devices, redirection and netcat for that. On the server you can run a netcat process listening on a given tcp port with stdin and stdout redirected to/from the serial device like that: nc -l 9801 > /dev/ttyS0 < /dev/ttyS0 Where 9801 in this example is the tcp port to listen on. You can setup the serial ...


6

The connectors themself arn't actually specific to a protocol - It simply refers to the number of pins and that its sub miniature. You could in theory wire up any suitable connector to the right electrical connections and to use it. In most systems I've seen, serial ports had 9 pins (since they didn't implement the whole 25 pin standard). I could also have, ...


6

It stands for communications i believe - since parallel ports were lpt (or line printer ports) and serial ports were used for communications. Interestingly I haven't found any reference that confirms this so far however - this is the closest i can find to a reference, but it seems to be taken for granted in windows and dos. There's no acronym or acronym ...


5

"Method Using Elevated Command Prompt" From Start Menu type cmd into search bar right click on cmd.exe and select run as administrator at UAC select yes to allow Windows Command Processor Program to make changes. At the Command prompt type SET DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPRESENT_DEVICES=1 (Followed by enter) Then to open device manager type DEVMGMT.MSC ...


5

I'm not an electronics expert but everything I've ever read about attaching serial ports to boards that have 3.3v UART pads says to use a TTL converter, or convert the voltage somehow. So I believe you really need something to convert to the proper voltage. You might get away with it if you only use it to receive serial data from the UART, but I wouldn't ...


5

Industrial and test equipment often uses serial ports. For example in the manufacturing facility where I work there are serial connections to meters, power supplies, signal generators, and the equipment under test. The test station must communicate with all these devices to run automated production tests. SCADA Systems, which perform wide area data ...


5

I'm not at work so I don't have any hardware in front of me, but the FTDI application note AN_107 - Advanced Driver Options looks to have some promising options. In particular, I think the "Ignore Hardware Serial Number" (section 7.1, page 20) option would do what you want. 7.1 Ignore Hardware Serial Number If devices have the same vendor ID and ...


5

Point of Sale systems use something like this a lot of the time. I used to work for a company who would have the UPC Scanner, a scale and some other input devices all running into the one card via the multi connection cable.


5

I can honestly say that I've never found a limitation to the number of COM port devices that a machine can use. I've done a lot of work with machines that use multiple USB to 4-port RS232 devices and I'm pretty sure that on our setups machines quite regularly had COM ports ranging from COM1 upto COM16, all in use at the same time. I would expect there to ...


5

First, when connecting two computers back-to-back via serial RS-232, you need to use a null-modem connector (crossover) so that you connect input to output and output to input. You can get a null-modem cable, or you can get an adapter to replace the gender changer. Once connected, your thought of using putty is on the right track. You need to be sure both ...


4

My brand new Dell Latitude E5500 has a serial port on the left side of it. Alas, it has no parallel port.


4

This is all set out in the VirtualBox documentation. Particularly online or in the pdf. Essentially run VirtualBox and go, (VM name) > Settings > Serial Ports > Enable port > connect to device And add the name of your device. Be careful about file permissions. If you're running headless, I think you can do it through VBoxManage modifyvm.


4

At my previous job we often had to deal with console ports on networking equipment, meaning we had to have access to a serial port even though our current laptops didn't have one. We used something that works like this, just not that particular model. This should work fine for connecting a modem to. When it comes to modems I would steer clear of internal ...


4

See USBtoSerial for a variety of products which will do this. They provide a connector to go from the PC to anywhere from a 4-port to a 16-port external box.


4

I got it working under Linux... This blog showed me how to get the serial connection set up on my PC, then I consulted some Gentoo documentation on setting up DNS and NAT.


4

If your application is running and the port is open, no other applications will be able to read/write to/from the same port. But, if your application is not running, any other application will be able to open the port and to send data, commands to the device.


4

RS-232 is point to point, so you cannot do anything else other than bring all the devices into your server on separate lines. You could use some sort of concentrator (either pure RS-232, or RS-232/USB converter), however the physical link problem you are dealing with was solved a long time ago in industrial processes and is RS-485. This allows point to ...


4

In initial screen Session | Logging Select All session output, then select save file. After saving the file, use any hex editor to see the result.



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