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To add to the answers above: For certain applications, COM ports are still useful, but mostly in niche cases. For example it is possible to build a simple and cheap PIC microcontroller program using a COM port. In this example the port isn't actually used for RS-232, the control signals are manipulated in non-standard ways. As such it is not possible to use ...


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Some info about serial or com ports An Asynchronous port on the computer used to connect a serial device to the computer and capable of transmitting one bit at a time. Serial ports are typically identified on IBM compatible computers as COM (communications) ports. For example, a mouse might be connected to COM1 and a modem to COM2. With the introduction ...


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A traditional com port normally implemented RS-232 which is a rather simple serial protocol that according to the Wikipedia article dates back to 1969. It can be implemented using relatively simple logic that suited technology of the time. Downsides are that it operates at a relatively low speed and the protocol has no concept of identifiying a device and ...


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Keep in mind that personal computers and computers in general predate USB. Before USB, we also needed some type of ports to connect out peripheral devices to computers. "Com" port is one of those ports. It's also much simpler than USB, so due to its simplicity it's still somewhat popular. It was also in use for many decades before USB became popular, so it ...


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I think the program you are after is called ser2net. It bridges serial streams to TCP ports of your choice. In Ubuntu / Debian do the following: # apt-get install ser2net then edit /etc/ser2net.conf and set up a line such as this: 2000:telnet:600:/dev/ttyUSB0:115200 8DATABITS NONE 1STOPBIT banner and finally restart the service # systemctl restart ...


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Use SIR with module option tx_window=1. Once you compiled and installed your kernel module it should be loaded automatically once you plug-in the dongle the first time. Now you have to tell your machine to initialize the IrDA subsystem. In SuSE distro's this reacting on USB events is usually done via hotplug This is very easy, too: Simply let hotplug ...


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To change the serial port bit rate and such, hit Ctrl-A P or Ctrl-A O. The first takes you to a screen that lets you change these settings only, while the second second takes you to a higher-level menu that offers a way to change those settings and more. Note that in the lower-left corner of the window, you were offered "Ctrl-A Z for help". The resulting ...


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The stty command can be used to change the parameters of a serial port in Linux, such as baud rate, number of start, stop and parity bits, and flow control options, among others. You can find some documentation on it in the Serial HOWTO on TLDP.


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Use minicom. Install it by typing sudo apt-get install minicom. Then run minicom -s and configure your serial port settings in the Serial Port menu. Then select Save setup as dfl. Exit, and then run minicom. If it gives you error that you don't have permissions, try sudo minicom. Now it is the same as Windows.


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That is very difficult. The serial port can be programmed at certain baudrates, which normally vary between 300 Bauds (or so) to 115200 (230400, and 460800 on more recent machines). Most all speeds are however multiples: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, etc. MIDI however is 31250 Bauds, which is difficult to program, as the there is no 'harmonic' relation. As ...


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It is very probable that the ttyS0 port actually exists on your motherboard. And very possibly there is also a connector on the motherboard to use it too! When I bought my last board, I came to that conclusion too (by seeing the port listed), I then looked up all connectors in the board's manual. There was no direct connector to the outside, just a small ...


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These ports actually exist on your motherboard. They are just not connected to an external port like they are in (some) desktops.



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