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The "Links" toolbar in the OS is a magic folder that points to the IE favorites toolbar. If you browse with windows explorer to "c:\users{username}\favorites" you will see a folder named "Favorites Bar". If you dive into that folder and then click on the blank space in the location area, the path you see is actually "C:\Users{username}\Favorites\Links" ...


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I think you triggered a glitch, perhaps. As *.COM extension is from MS-DOS and only for 16bit binaries, 32bit Windows created a PIF shortcut for those files which would trigger compatibility layer to set up the 16bit-related environment. However, this part does not exist on 64bit Windows as 16bit executables are old enough and there are many alternatives to ...


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Even faster: once you are viewing your app in Windows Explorer just right click it and select Create Shortcut. Windows will tell you it can't create a shortcut where you are and ask if you'd like to place it on your Desktop instead.


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From the masterful analysis of the problem by @Yorik, we can find a solution to the problem : Open Control Panel -> Internet Options Go to the tab Security Click on the Internet zone Click on Custom level... Find Launching applications and unsafe files, and set it to Enable Click OK This will enable the download of executable files from the Internet, ...


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The registry tweak of setting Link to zero in HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer works in Windows 10 Technical Preview build 10130. I do not know if it will work in build 10074 or if there is some anomaly on your copy which is causing it to revert, which could conceivably be connected to your machine not updating to the ...


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The mklink /J creates a junction, but it is unwise to junction the Windows folder. You could junction Program Files and/or Program Files (x86). You can also junction your My Documents/My Music/ and etc. You can also move the swap file. Although it might be physically possible to junction Windows it could easily have unexpected consequences. Programs ...


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These special directories are called symbolic links. It's possible in theory to move the Windows directory to another drive and replace it with a symbolic link, but one of many reasons the OS would not run from it is that support for symbolic links is part of the OS. The support would have to be implemented at a higher level for this to work. Moreover, ...



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