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51

Short answer : you can't prevent them from sniffing your traffic, but you can make it meaningless for them by using encryption. Either use encrypted protocols (HTTPS, SSH, SMTP/TLS, POP/TLS, etc.) or use encrypted tunnels to encapsulate your unencrypted protocols. For example, if you use HTTPS instead of HTTP, the content of the webpages you fetch will ...


39

Use Chrome and navigate to chrome://net-internals/ It allows detailed analysis and dumps.


21

I found Charles Proxy. It's much closer to the functionality of Fiddler. It's not free, but it may be worth the price.


21

My favorite mac app for monitoring traffic is HTTPScoop, I detail that as well as using tcpdump from the commandline in this post I blogged last year.


20

A few options: tcpdump Cocoa Packet Analyzer Packet Peeper AirMagnet See also this search on macupdate. Answer shamelessly cribbed from these other SU questions: http://superuser.com/questions/76656/is-there-a-nice-graphical-packet-sniffer-for-mac-osx http://superuser.com/questions/18815/can-i-do-packet-sniffing-out-of-the-box-on-os-x ...


19

Nothing (by default). Unless you are using some kind of encryption, every hop between your computer and the server you are accessing can read the packets you are transmitting and receiving.


14

For general looking at everything that goes out over your network card, I would use Wireshark, You can sort by protocol and "Go deep" in to exactly what is being transmitted where! Also for Windows, if you just want to see (and edit) HTML requests, any program that youcan input a proxy server to, or respects the computers "Internet Options" proxy setting, ...


12

Not what you asked, but in Firefox the Live HTTP Headers add-on is all I need if I want to edit and re-play requests. In Firebug, the Network Monitoring shows all requests and responses. Likewise, in Safari the Resources pane of the built-in Web Inspector covers most of my needs as well, but does not show the payload of POST Ajax/XHR requests (the responses ...


12

You can use the specific HTTP header display filters to show either just the request headers, just the response headers or both. For just the request headers: tshark tcp port 80 or tcp port 443 -V -R "http.request" For just the response headers: tshark tcp port 80 or tcp port 443 -V -R "http.response" And for both the request and response headers: ...


8

Beware of terminology difficulties here. Promiscuous mode is a concept that originated on wired Ethernet, where you have your card show you all the traffic your hub is repeating onto your port, even if it's not addressed to you. Many (but not all) Wi-Fi cards support promiscuous mode, in a way that looks a lot like Ethernet promiscuous mode; it shows only ...


8

Portmon, from Sysinternals, will do what you need: Portmon is a utility that monitors and displays all serial and parallel port activity on a system. It has advanced filtering and search capabilities that make it a powerful tool for exploring the way Windows works, seeing how applications use ports, or tracking down problems in system or ...


7

Fire up Backtrack if you haven't already. Since you're not after traffic - just the level 2 address - this should be easy. First, start airodump-ng and with the command airodump-ng --berlin 60 <wireless interface here> You'll get a screen that looks like: In the area marked client there is a column describing power in decibels (i.e. the more ...


7

I've used mitmproxy for intercepting HTTP traffic. It's a great tool and you can use it for debugging mobile devices as well or any operating system for that matter.


7

Wireshark should help you. It is cross platform and allows you to sniff any packet that goes through the wire


7

Actually, Dropbox recently launched a referral program to help its users earn twice as much space as they have by inviting their Friend to dropbox, So probably someone you know invited you using your corporate mail.


7

In principle, "packet sniffing" is not a job of routers. Routers don't inspect the content of a packet, they just pick the header of the packet and find a suitable exit interface so that it will reach the destination stated in the packet's header. However, your packets could be sniffed by anyone interested while the packets are moving. Interested bodies ...


6

Linux / Windows + Cygwin tcpdump tcp Linux Gui / Windows Wireshark For a specific port (80 for example): tcpdump tcp port 80 for incoming trafic to port 80 tcpdump tcp dst port 80 Serial port sniffer: click and : click


6

Try tcpflow -v -i iface This will create a lot of files having filenames like "IP_A.port.-IP_B.port".


6

No. Whenever you're using a HTTPS connection with a valid certificate to connect to a server you trust, every bit of content sent over this channel is encrypted using SSL/TLS. If you are on a channel where it is easy to sniff the sent data, i.e. on a switched LAN or on an unsecured WiFi network, an attacker could only see the encrypted data and not the ...


6

Further reading seems to suggest that the data flowing to and from my computer can be 'sniffed' by anyone if it's not encoded through SSL or similar? Is this true? Yes, this is true. Both wireless (WiFi) and wired (Ethernet) networks can be sniffed easily, although it may be a little more complicated on switched Ethernet. Even if you are connected to ...


6

In addition to Charles (already mentioned), I also like the HttpFox add-on for Mozilla Firefox. Like Charles, you can use it on both Mac and Windows. It's lighter-weight than Charles because it lives in the browser, useful for quick troubleshooting. Here's some information from the HttpFox page: HttpFox monitors and analyzes all incoming and outgoing ...


6

You can use TCPView from Microsoft/Sysinternals. If you find it difficult to capture the port opening with that utility, than the best bet is to install and run Wireshark to get a network trace (assume you aren't talking about a local software-based firewall.


6

MAC address is changeable, quite easily actually. But, I guess you could always try with netstumbler, ethereal, or something alike.


6

You could use pfSense it has many features: Firewall Network Address Translation (NAT) Redundancy Load Balancing Reporting and Monitoring RRD Graphs The RRD graphs in pfSense maintain historical information on the following. CPU utilization Total throughput Firewall states Individual throughput for all interfaces Packets per second rates for all ...


6

Just to make sure you're not missing the obvious...you're aware that Wireshark does have a nice GUI, and is protocol aware? And has simple analysis features like "Follow TCP Stream" that making analyzing SMTP (and other text-based protocol transactions) so much easier? Screenshots are here.


6

WireShark can do this. You can even tell WireShark your WPA key so it can decrypt it for you: More in How to Decrypt 802.11.


5

If you are willing to dabble a bit in Python, Scapy is a good tool. For simpler activities, hping3 is a quick Tcl based tool. An important advantage with these is, they are available as debian packages.


5

I would recommended Wireshark which will track any traffic on a particular network card. From a Wireless router perspective I am not aware of any software that can do this unless the router itself is linux based in which case you can use tcpdump


5

Wireshark will show you all the packets that are coming in and out of your machine.


5

If you run DD-WRT on your home router, you can run tcpdump directly on the router, with the output brought back to your local system for later processing. An example: ssh root@192.168.1.1 -c "tcpdump -v -w - -i eth2" > mypackets.pcap Just hit Ctrl-C when done, and load the capture file into your favorite analysis tool such as Wireshark.



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