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38

Try setting UseDNS to no in /etc/sshd_config or /etc/ssh/sshd_config.


15

When I ran ssh -vvv on a server with a similar slow performance I saw a hang here: debug1: Next authentication method: gssapi-with-mic By editing /etc/ssh/ssh_config and commenting out that authentication method I got the login performance back to normal. Here's what I have in my /etc/ssh/ssh_config on the server: GSSAPIAuthentication no You can set ...


11

You have to gunzip then untar on Solaris. It should come with GNU tar: gtar xzvf somefile.tar.gz if that doesn't work: gunzip -c somefile.tar.gz |tar xvf -


10

You are correct; Oracle is no longer contributing to OpenSolaris (reference). Oracle Solaris 11 Express releases more often than the standard build of Solaris and includes newer technologies. It may be used free of charge for development and testing, but not for production. Production use requires purchasing some form of Oracle Premier Support ...


10

Endianness is a property of the CPU, not the operating system. Solaris is normally big-endian because Suns used big-endian CPUs, while UNIX was originally little-endian because it ran on little-endian machines. Today, common UNIX-derived operating systems such as Linux run on a wide variety of CPU architectures and can be either big- or little-endian ...


10

This is the documented way to do it: export PAGER=less


9

If you have GNU head, you can use head -n -5 file.txt to print all but the last 5 lines of file.txt. If head -n takes no negative arguments, try head -n $(( $(wc -l file.txt | awk '{print $1}') - 5 )) file.txt


7

Your assumptions are incorrect: Solaris is not big-endian, Unix is not little-endian. Both depend on the CPU they are running on. Solaris on a big-endian SPARC CPU is big-endian, Solaris on a little-endian Intel or AMD CPU is little-endian. Solaris is one flavor of Unix, others similarly run either big-endian or little-endian depending on the CPU ...


7

The standard cause for this is some user process keeping a deleted file open. When this happens, the space is not visible via ‘du’, since the file is no longer visible in the directory tree. However, the space is still used by the file until it is deallocated, and that can only happen once the last process which has the file open either ...


7

x86 is their way of stating it is for both the x86-32 and the x86-64 architectures; in other words, it supports both 32-bit and 64-bit in the same install package. According to this, it actually installs both kernels: If you choose Solaris, the system will boot the 32-bit kernel. If you choose Solaris 64-bit, it will choose the 64-bit kernel. ...


7

This is what your PATH environment variable is for. Arrange your PATH environment variable so that both locations are on the path, AND in the order you want them to to be checked. So in your example, /usr/local/bin should be earlier in the PATH than /usr/local/bin/scripts. Most systems will probably have /usr/local/bin already in the system path, so ...


7

Solaris 10 and later no longer make /usr/ucb/ps setuid-root by default, and you need root privileges to poke into the address space of other users processes to get the full set of arguments. Run it as root or the process owner to see more than 80 characters of the command line. On Solaris 11, if you use options without a dash (like /usr/bin/ps auxwww) they ...


6

The ZFS filesystem in OpenSolaris was the deciding factor over Linux/BSD for me when I recently built a file server. Some compelling ZFS features for me were: RAID-Z redundancy Data integrity checksums fundamental to the design Snapshots Simple command line tools Sure, ZFS can be bolted on to Linux with FUSE but in OpenSolaris it is standard and (so far ...


6

There are easier ways, but for portability sake we can use a bit of forking and backticks: find . -name *_compressed -exec sh -c 'cp {} `echo {} | sed 's/english/spanish/'`' \;


6

No, since $XMLFILES was empty it tried to remove /*. All that can do is remove files from the root directory, which a normal user isn't supposed to be able to create in the first place.


6

You're likely to have only one option as far as sparc emulation on windows 7 goes - QEMU - which is the only common emulator supporting dissimilar architectures. If it works, it'll likely to be MUCH slower than a real system , and apparently it dosen't work yet


6

Recursive grep on Solaris: find . -name "*.[chix]" | xargs grep -i -n pattern_to_search


6

You can run /usr/platform/$(uname -i)/sbin/prtdiag -v to get an idea about what is installed in your box and what memory slots are free.


6

If by "something like" you mean: '$' when normal user, '#' when root then put PS1=\$ in your .profile Otherwise use PS1=$


6

The output of isainfo -k shows you in what mode the kernel is running. In your case you are running a 64-bit kernel. Everything inside the kernel is run in 64-bit mode (device drivers, system calls, etc. etc.) The beauty of Solaris (and plenty other OSs, I assume) is that it can natively execute 32-bit binaries as well. Most programs, tools, utilities that ...


6

Well you don't do it at all with sed or regular expressions. What you do is to use the program chsh to change the shell of a user. chsh -s /bin/false username alternatively: usermod -s /bin/false username If you wanted to replace it with an actual shell you'd also have to make sure that it is listed in /etc/shells.


5

You could try running top in batch mode: top -b -n100 > top.log where -n100 stands for 100 iterations. Another alternative is to use ps with appropriate arguments (these are from Linux, you may need to consult the man page of ps in Solaris). For convenience the command is embedded into a Bash script. #!/bin/bash while true ; do ps -eo ...


5

use type command For example [max@localhost ~]$ type cal cal is /usr/bin/cal [max@localhost ~]$ type ifconfig ifconfig is /sbin/ifconfig [max@localhost ~]$ type ping ping is /bin/ping


5

firefox -no-remote -ProfileManager


4

This "shell script" should display milliseconds: #!/bin/ksh if [ ! -x /var/tmp/time_ms ] then cat > /tmp/time_ms.c << % #include <sys/time.h> main() { struct timeval tv; gettimeofday(&tv,(void*)0); printf("%d.%d\n",tv.tv_sec,tv.tv_usec/1000); } % PATH=$PATH:/usr/sfw gcc /tmp/time_ms.c -o ...


4

You can always start ssh with the -v option which displays what is being done at the moment. $ ssh -v you@host With the information you gave I can only suggest some client side configurations: Since you write that you are entering passwords manually, I would suggest that you use public key authentification if possible. This removes you as a speed ...


4

I was a RapidSVN guy before I discovered Bazaar Explorer: Both are great though. I'd strongly suggest learning the command-line as well once you get the time, you won't regret it!


4

I think it would be a lot better to install/use sudo an with a configuration config that allows NOPASSWD for the specific action you are trying to automate. It will be much safer to allow a specific command via sudo then it would be to store your root password in a text file somewhere.


4

the equivalent of sudo on solaris is pfexec: http://developers.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/opensolaris/pfexec.html http://www.c0t0d0s0.org/archives/4844-Less-known-Solaris-features-pfexec.html http://www.softpanorama.org/Solaris/Security/solaris_rbac.shtml maybe you should use that instead of a 3rd party sudo.


4

Perhaps this isn't an answer to your question directly, but my own experience has been that typical NAS hardware costs about the same as a regular PC. The only reason you might get NAS vs a PC is its lower physical profile. We evaluated the NAS vs PC question quite a bit and eventually ended up with PC, because it has significantly more flexibility for us. ...



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