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33

Try setting UseDNS to no in /etc/sshd_config or /etc/ssh/sshd_config.


13

When I ran ssh -vvv on a server with a similar slow performance I saw a hang here: debug1: Next authentication method: gssapi-with-mic By editing /etc/ssh/ssh_config and commenting out that authentication method I got the login performance back to normal. Here's what I have in my /etc/ssh/ssh_config on the server: GSSAPIAuthentication no You can set ...


11

You have to gunzip then untar on Solaris. It should come with GNU tar: gtar xzvf somefile.tar.gz if that doesn't work: gunzip -c somefile.tar.gz |tar xvf -


10

You are correct; Oracle is no longer contributing to OpenSolaris (reference). Oracle Solaris 11 Express releases more often than the standard build of Solaris and includes newer technologies. It may be used free of charge for development and testing, but not for production. Production use requires purchasing some form of Oracle Premier Support ...


10

Endianness is a property of the CPU, not the operating system. Solaris is normally big-endian because Suns used big-endian CPUs, while UNIX was originally little-endian because it ran on little-endian machines. Today, common UNIX-derived operating systems such as Linux run on a wide variety of CPU architectures and can be either big- or little-endian ...


10

This is the documented way to do it: export PAGER=less


7

Your assumptions are incorrect: Solaris is not big-endian, Unix is not little-endian. Both depend on the CPU they are running on. Solaris on a big-endian SPARC CPU is big-endian, Solaris on a little-endian Intel or AMD CPU is little-endian. Solaris is one flavor of Unix, others similarly run either big-endian or little-endian depending on the CPU ...


7

The standard cause for this is some user process keeping a deleted file open. When this happens, the space is not visible via ‘du’, since the file is no longer visible in the directory tree. However, the space is still used by the file until it is deallocated, and that can only happen once the last process which has the file open either ...


7

x86 is their way of stating it is for both the x86-32 and the x86-64 architectures; in other words, it supports both 32-bit and 64-bit in the same install package. According to this, it actually installs both kernels: If you choose Solaris, the system will boot the 32-bit kernel. If you choose Solaris 64-bit, it will choose the 64-bit kernel. ...


7

This is what your PATH environment variable is for. Arrange your PATH environment variable so that both locations are on the path, AND in the order you want them to to be checked. So in your example, /usr/local/bin should be earlier in the PATH than /usr/local/bin/scripts. Most systems will probably have /usr/local/bin already in the system path, so ...


7

Solaris 10 and later no longer make /usr/ucb/ps setuid-root by default, and you need root privileges to poke into the address space of other users processes to get the full set of arguments. Run it as root or the process owner to see more than 80 characters of the command line. On Solaris 11, if you use options without a dash (like /usr/bin/ps auxwww) they ...


7

If you have GNU head, you can use head -n -5 file.txt to print all but the last 5 lines of file.txt. If head -n takes no negative arguments, try head -n $(( $(wc -l file.txt | awk '{print $1}') - 5 )) file.txt


6

The ZFS filesystem in OpenSolaris was the deciding factor over Linux/BSD for me when I recently built a file server. Some compelling ZFS features for me were: RAID-Z redundancy Data integrity checksums fundamental to the design Snapshots Simple command line tools Sure, ZFS can be bolted on to Linux with FUSE but in OpenSolaris it is standard and (so far ...


6

There are easier ways, but for portability sake we can use a bit of forking and backticks: find . -name *_compressed -exec sh -c 'cp {} `echo {} | sed 's/english/spanish/'`' \;


6

No, since $XMLFILES was empty it tried to remove /*. All that can do is remove files from the root directory, which a normal user isn't supposed to be able to create in the first place.


6

You're likely to have only one option as far as sparc emulation on windows 7 goes - QEMU - which is the only common emulator supporting dissimilar architectures. If it works, it'll likely to be MUCH slower than a real system , and apparently it dosen't work yet


6

Recursive grep on Solaris: find . -name "*.[chix]" | xargs grep -i -n pattern_to_search


6

You can run /usr/platform/$(uname -i)/sbin/prtdiag -v to get an idea about what is installed in your box and what memory slots are free.


6

If by "something like" you mean: '$' when normal user, '#' when root then put PS1=\$ in your .profile Otherwise use PS1=$


6

The output of isainfo -k shows you in what mode the kernel is running. In your case you are running a 64-bit kernel. Everything inside the kernel is run in 64-bit mode (device drivers, system calls, etc. etc.) The beauty of Solaris (and plenty other OSs, I assume) is that it can natively execute 32-bit binaries as well. Most programs, tools, utilities that ...


5

Well you don't do it at all with sed or regular expressions. What you do is to use the program chsh to change the shell of a user. chsh -s /bin/false username alternatively: usermod -s /bin/false username If you wanted to replace it with an actual shell you'd also have to make sure that it is listed in /etc/shells.


5

You could try running top in batch mode: top -b -n100 > top.log where -n100 stands for 100 iterations. Another alternative is to use ps with appropriate arguments (these are from Linux, you may need to consult the man page of ps in Solaris). For convenience the command is embedded into a Bash script. #!/bin/bash while true ; do ps -eo ...


5

use type command For example [max@localhost ~]$ type cal cal is /usr/bin/cal [max@localhost ~]$ type ifconfig ifconfig is /sbin/ifconfig [max@localhost ~]$ type ping ping is /bin/ping


4

Solaris 11 is already available as a bootable live USB image. Have a look to "USB Install Images for x86" in its download page


4

While I can see not wanting to modify the original file, you can do the translation in a pipe. That way, you're not modifying the data, but you still get the benefit (in Unix utility terms) of turning ~ into end-of-line. This should do the trick: cat ding | tr "~" "\n" | tail -3 It is not the most efficient thing in the universe, but even on a ...


4

Unfortunately there is no generic answer to the question that you are asking. The reason is that Linux and Unix system allow complete freedom to install parts of the operating system in one or many partitions, local or remote. In addition to the partitioning freedom, some sysadmins routinely create symbolic links to well-known (i.e. FHS) OS directory names ...


4

Figured it out myself! It was with the way I set the environment variable in the .profile file. Correct: export P4CONFIG=.p4settings Incorrect: P4CONFIG=.p4settings The official documentation on the Solaris website doesn't mention anything about having to use "export". docs.oracle.com/cd/E19683-01/806-7612/customize-8/index.html


4

For Sun hardware, try prtdiag -v - it will show the status of all hardware, but presentation is not consistent across different platforms.


4

Both. Solaris 10 and later has both 32-bit and 64-bit binaries. On boot the CPU is detected and a 32-bit or 64-bit kernel is automatically chosen. When you run a program, similar detection occurs as to whether to use the 32-bit or 64-bit (if available) binary.


4

ZFS uses block level dedup rather than file level, so the tool would need to scan every file, create a DB of block hashes and then compare them to detect duplicate blocks. I'm not aware of anything that can do this. I think the easiest way (if not your only way) would be to test it out. Remember to enable dedup before you start copying the files, the dedup ...



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