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24

The motherboard integrated soundcards usually have much more noise, noticeable at higher gains, due to proximity to other components and not being shielded. This noise can be very unpleasant, and if you have good speakers/headphones, it's even more noticeable. If you care about the sound quality and/if you have good quality speakers/headphones, you should ...


16

It depends on what hardware you have in the computer, but there usually is a difference between speaker and headphone ports - specifically, relating to the max/min speaker/headphone impedance values you can use with either port. Certain sound cards, for example the Auzentech X-Fi-Forte, include a built-in headphone amplifier on the headphone port. Taking a ...


11

I'm using the motherboard's sound in my HTPC, with optical output to my receiver; it does 7.1, DTS, AC3, and other three letter acronyms. I also game on the system, and have no noticeable performance impact from not having a "dedicated sound processor" or whatever the marketing folks are saying these days. I find that sound perception is subjective, and ...


10

A single device outputting to multiple devices seems to work OK. It changes the electrical characteristics (impedence changes, but the tolerance of most devices is actually quite wide) and could theoretically cause damage, but has always worked fine for me. However, multiple devices outputting to a single device is different. That's a situation where ...


9

It isn't your screen causing the noise per se, it is caused from one of the controller chips (for either the PS/2 or USB) having interference with the sound chip. Some motherboards are very badly shielded and there is just nothing you can do to fix that, all I can really recommend is purchasing a PCI / PCI Express sound card and using that instead.


9

The 5 audio jacks you quote is the important thing, not the number of speakers. It refers to the audio jacks on your motherboard or sound card, not the plugs from your speakers. If you have multiple audio output jacks on your motherboard/sound card then you have support for surround sound (providing the correct drivers are installed) The standard jacks ...


9

The answer to your first question is: Yes, using USB will skip your current sound card. Or stated differently, the USB device is also a sound card, so once you plug it in, you will have two different sound cards. The sound quality you get through a USB device does not depend on the quality of the sound card in your computer. The answer to the second ...


7

The audio ports detect that something has been plugged in by monitoring for a change in resistance across the port. When nothing is plugged in the resistance is infinite, but when a coil is plugged in (speaker or mic) there is now a measurable resistance, and the computer pops up and asks you what it is you plugged in. EDIT: I've been digging, and ...


7

As pipTheGeek stated, another option to the electrical resistance measurement is a mechanical switch. Switch pushed down - something's plugged in. You can test this by plugging a Y-adapter or size adapter into the jack. If the jack acts like there's something plugged into the port, you have a mechanical switch. The adapter won't make any connections ...


7

USB Headsets are soundcards. Only 1/8" jack type headsets go through the onboard soundcard. Source: regularly configuring PulseAudio on Linux.


6

It might be some odd power issue. The only solution to that really though is external speakers. The sudden albeit small power drain from a loud sound might be a problem.


5

Not sure I 100% understand your question, but you might want to check out: http://software.muzychenko.net/eng/vac.html sounds like this might fit your requirements.


5

No, soundcard (and other) hardware is managed by kernel, and correct modules must be loaded. Maybe livecd loads modules which now are not installed yet. If you are sure that sound is not muted and alsa is running (sudo /etc/init.d/alsa start) look at ubuntu help starting from "Is the system recognizing your sound card?". You'll find how to know if your ...


5

I have experienced this with my HP Pavillion dm4 as well, and it drove me nuts. The reason this occurs is that the audio chipset in some HP laptops is configured so that the headphones are used as a "communication device" and the speakers are used to play other sounds. Whenever you use a communication program, like Skype or Google Video Chat, it sends the ...


5

It depends on both the mic and sound device. The simple answer is, you will probably have a significant difference in sound quality and it'll probably sound better. The major difference isn't just in the sound card - its also in the mic . The fact that it has a mic has a USB connector allows 'better' more power hungry components to be used compared to one ...


5

Are you dual-booting the machine? If you are can you test the sound in another operating system? with crackling 9 times out of 10 it's either the output cable/connector or the source of audio (spotify, iTunes etc.). If the crackling persists in Windows 8 and not in another OS then it may be a driver issue and you should email Realtek to see if they will be ...


4

An interesting question. Back in the old days we used to have something called an acoustic coupler which did just that. So yes, in theory it could work. In praxis you will run into problems. E.g. the microphone on the phone might distort the sound of your fax. Our your speakers might do that. Or the software in the mobile will drop parts of the audio ...


4

I struggled with alsa when using Arch, and have always opted to use OSS instead OSS Advantages; Per-application volume control. Some legacy cards are supported better. Initial response time in sound applications is usually better. Better support for applications that use the OSS API. Many applications still use this API, and do not require an emulation ...


4

Getting a dedicate sound card will definitely improves your sound experience (provide you have good speaker/headphone). But if your audio hick-ups is really caused by high CPU load. Then you might still get the same problem. Is audio processing using on-board card such as VIA HD (VIA VT 1708S) hardware accelerated or it's all CPU CPU Is audio processing ...


4

I work part time in a recording studio, and this is very common on computers with no external sound card, audio processor or recording interface. Electrical interference can occur in or around the motherboard, tower, cables, fans and pretty much anything electrical in or connected to your computer. This interference can manifest itself in scratching or ...


4

lsusb - Display information about USB buses in the system and the devices connected to them. or lspci - Display information about PCI buses in the system and devices connected to them.


4

Are you sure that you're losing quality because of the 3.5mm -> 6.3mm adaptor? If it's the one that came with the headphones it will be made to the same high quality as the headphones - particularly if it's from a company link Sennheiser. I don't recall ever seeing a computer sound card with anything other than 3.5mm sockets. While there are probably ...


4

It may well be a DPC latency issue, which can be caused by a variety of things including, sound cards, network adapters, drivers etc. Unfortunately, tracking down the cause of these problems is no easy task. There is a utility DPC Latency Checker that can help you check for latency and there is a wealth of documentation on the same site. If you have ...


4

As other have already mentioned, media players normally have the option to use the default audio device or any other in its preferences settings. If you are using Vista or Windows 7, you can also set a secondary audio device to be the default communication device (look in Sound Properties), so you can have normal sound coming out of your speakers, but have ...


4

Try setting up a stream with VLC, such that it runs on your desktop and your laptop. Then let your desktop play the audio through the speakers and mute it on the laptop. Here's a nice tutorial for setting up the stream from WikiHow First, you need to download VLC. Install it on each computer that you want to be able to watch the streams. Run ...


4

Found it. Open registry Editor with elevated privileges Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E96C-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}\0000\GlobalSettings Change the value EnableDynamicDevices to zero. Restart your system.


4

Wild guess: the noise is loud enough to make some automatic head parking mechanism in your laptop kick in (this is the anti-shock technology which is supposed to protect the drive if the machine is dropped). On the other hand, if that was the problem I can't believe you wouldn't have continuous problems using your lappy in a car/train/plane too (is it ok in ...


4

From this forum thread: USB headsets basically have a USB sound "card" integrated. For the Logi USB headsets that's a small unit integrated with the cord. You could pull your soundcard out of your PC and the USB headset will still give you sound. Which makes sense.



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