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1

What you have to do is ALWAYS downloading software from their official website and NEVER from downloading sites just like CNET (or everywhere else depending on your country). You will avoid lots of bloatware with this kind of habit. These sites are the main source of additional crapwares in installers. Some installers will still have bloatware (Oracle's JRE ...


0

Some sites have several download buttons, the larger ones next to "we recommend" text, and one little button to download what you really want (I might be thinking of download.com, but I haven't used windows in a few months). On my desktop with adblockplus and noscript enabled the bundle download buttons disappeared. In fact I only noticed how intrusive ...


2

You may also want to check out Unchecky.. Have you ever felt, while installing software, that the installer tries to push additional unwanted programs at all cost? Ever missed a checkbox, and spent hours afterwards removing adware? Ever opened your browser after an installation, only to find out that you have a new homepage, a new search engine, or even a ...


1

This isn't crapware. That piece of software is a feature of InstallShield - a popular installer system; it has also this kind of updater service that developers may use to deliver updates to their application. Its presence doesn't hurt, but if you really want to uninstall it you'll need to remove the software it came with, look for anything that uses ...


15

For sourceforge in particular, append ?nowrap to the URL - this will allow you to download the file without the sourceforge "wrapper" that adds crapware to the installer - for example use http://sourceforge.net/projects/filezilla/files/FileZilla_Client/3.9.0.2/FileZilla_3.9.0.2_win32-setup.exe/download?nowrap as opposed to the default ...


6

Related to Ninite (GUI to download apps without installation procedures) and Chocolatey (command line program more geared for scripting installs): http://portableapps.com/ Tons of apps: from Antivirus, to notepad++, to games like minesweeper, to XAMPP server packages, etc - with the added ease that they aren't "installed" per-se. It's akin unzip and run. ...


18

I would recommend using Chocolatey. I've not seen any bloatware in the installers used there as they are sometimes repackaged by package maintainers. Chocolatey is a package manager for Windows (like apt-get or yum but for Windows). It was designed to be a decentralized framework for quickly installing applications and tools that you need. It is built ...


10

I totally empathize with you. I have my own approach and I'll happily share it. Some might think it's overkill but I have found it serves me very well. These days I keep my PC ultra-clean. Windows 7, Firefox, Office, Visual Studio, and a handful of freeware I have come to trust over time. I don't do PC gaming so that's about it. For anything and everything ...


62

In addition to what has been suggested, you'll find that by preferring open source software to closed source will generally take care of this problem for you. Instead of CNET, look on Sourceforge and GitHub and you'll find much better software. Update Many have also mentioned Chocolatey. It is definitely a big piece of the full puzzle. In general, command ...


71

I take it you're referring to windows programs? I circumvented the whole problem by using Linux Mint (and even keeping installed packages to a minimum with --no-install-recommends & a similar option in Synaptic/apt.conf). It's got Firefox, Chromium, Opera, LibreOffice, Flash Player, GIMP, tons of excellent "evilware-free" software. But if your ...



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