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3

I just recently purchased a Dell XPS Laptop and it came with a USB recovery key. I replaced the drive with SSD and it recovered to that media fine. Your issue is with a Desktop and two drives you need to make sure the bios has the SSD as the Primary drive and the other drive as the slave 'secondary'. As it seems to only recover to the drive it see's as C? ...


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Yes, you would see a difference. The seek times of a SSD are very low compared to platter drives. Also, that interface transfer rate is not the actual read/write speed, which would be significantly lower (likely less than 100MB/sec)


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As noted before, the hitachi will be hard pressed to go over 100MB/s in practical terms. All that "SATA3" labeling in HDDs is just affirming compatibility with the technology. The disks are as fast/slow as before. There are very few SSDs in the affordable range that can fully use the SATA3 6gig bandwidth. A cheap SSD drive may have a mediocre sequential ...


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what about dd: srchost:$ dd if=/sourcefile of=/dev/ssd1 bs=1G count=1000 skip=[0,1000,...] move disk... dsthost:$ dd if=/dev/ssd1 bs=1G >> /finalfile


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Open an elevated command prompt and type the items highlighted: Diskpart DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk (id) DISKPART> online disk (if the disk is not online) DISKPART> attributes disk clear readonly DISKPART> clean DISKPART> convert mbr (or gpt) DISKPART> create partition primary DISKPART> select part 1 DISKPART> active (if this is the boot ...


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SSD's are usually reliable and do not crash easily. According to your claim that your SDD is working fine now, I would recommend that you use your SSD as you are using now and I don't think it would crash now. If I were you, I would continue using the SSD as normal like nothing happened. Anyways keep a backup of your data.( although there is no need to)


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Right now I'd recommend you to try GParted. It's a live CD similar to Clonezilla, but it provides you with a nice graphical interface rather than text based console menus. If possible, create a backup of your HDD first, since you'll have to modify the original partition. Essentially the steps involved should look like this: Shrink your HDD's partition to ...


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Let's start with the theoretical answer. USB 3.0 has a higher (with SuperSpeed much higher) potential throughput, so it should have a fundamental advantage. However, in most cases the drives you are plugging into USB 3.0 ports are actually SATA drives at heart with an external case and are therefore either translating the data or encapsulating the data for ...


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The problem is that you do not get a CD with the operating system and it is already pre-installed. However, there is a partition containing the recovery data and best way is to simply reinstall Windows on your new SSD. In the BIOS, just set the SSD as the only boot drive once everything is installed. Once you're comfortable with the overall operation, you ...



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