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If you're willing to spend a little more money, I would get a better SSD and swap it out with the current one. I'm pretty sure HP would install Windows on the HDD, because of the very little space on the SSD. It's not enough for Windows. When you have a better SSD, make sure you have another PC with you. Take out the HDD and put the new SSD and the HDD ...


1

So I fixed this by changing the SATA port that my hard drive was plugged into. There seem to be three groups of sata ports each ran by a different chip so I'm not sure if only one of those groups work without extra drivers or something like that. Any further explanation from someone more technically minded wouldn't go amiss.


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If you care about your SSD life time then you need to be aware that due to limited write/erase cycles number per sector the device may start dying after a few years of serious usage. From this perspective it is recommended to put the most rewritable data on the HDD. OS will run much faster being placed on SSD, of course, but OS itself has files that are ...


1

It really supports any SATA version I, II, or III. The SATA drives and are backwards compatible. If the drive is SATA III and your MB Pro is SATA II, the dive will perform at the theoretical levels of a SATA II drive. Same for SATA I.


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You can take a look at the Link Speed under the Intel 5 Series Chipset section. SATA levels are named after a number (1, 2, 3) and also for their speeds. SATA 1.0 is known as SATA 1.5Gb/s SATA 2.0 is known as SATA 3.0Gb/s === You're computer supports SATA 2.0 SATA 3.0 is known as SATA 6.0Gb/s "Link speeds are the theoretical maximum speed at which data ...


0

I could not find the description on Apple site, but according macforum and wikipedia it goes with SATA 3, so go for this. However if you already have SATA 2 drive - it will work too. Here is a simple table which shows how the mixing of SATA II and SATA III devices at the same bus results: SATA 2 + SATA 3 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 2 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 3 ...


0

Your Macbook would at least support SATA II speeds, and would still provide you with a speed boost over a traditional mechanical drive in terms of loading times. Also, SATA II ports are compatible with SATA III drives so there shouldn't be any hardware compatibility issues.


1

One precaution you should take is to backup as normal Alex. That is not to say SSDs are unreliable. Far from it. I've personally deployed and supported lots of PCs and laptops for many years and I have to say that SSDs are a joy to work with in comparison to the traditional spinning hard disks. I've yet to see an SSD fail. Speaking to several laptop ...


1

There has been a lot of disambiguation about running things like CCleaner and Defrag on an SSD. Running constant sequential writes can in theory shorten the life expectancy of an SSD. However you're only loosing days off of an life expectancy of years. The drive will outlast your use of it for sure. The thing about Defrag is it won't speed up your drive in ...


0

SSD are faster than mechanic HD, especially in random access - when small amount of data needs to be read from different locations, which also means they degrade performances less even under heavy fragmentation. The difference is lessen on sequential access (i.e. large non fragmented files), but SSD wins even here, faster RAID of 10K RPM disks may came ...


0

If you care about your SSD life time then you need to be aware that due to limited write/erase cycles number per sector the device may start dying after a few years of serious usage. From this perspective it is recommended to put the most rewritable data on the HDD. OS will run much faster being placed on SSD, of course, but OS itself has files that are ...


4

It depends. Do programs on an SSD load faster? Yes, if the load time is bottlenecked by disk reads, which is often the case. No, if it's some other bottleneck - eg, a game that needs to talk to a DRM server may spend the majority of the time it's loading waiting for that rather than reading from disk. Other programs that have to spend a lot of time doing ...


0

If you are booted in *nix or any other OS for that matter, the SSD microcode presents the device as a hard disk. The sectors aren't on the SSD even any particular order in relation to what the software OS sees. This is why you aren't supposed to run defragmentation programs on an SSD for instance. The bottom line is you should be able to use any backup ...


0

Another alternative that I use and recommend is the Clonezilla (open source), you can use one pendrive to install and boot. http://clonezilla.org/ follow the instructions here to make a Clonezilla USB bootable flash drive > http://clonezilla.org/liveusb.php Boot from the your USB flash drive Do a disk to image (Old_SSD to an image file in HDD) Do an image ...


0

I did exactly this with Acronis True Image. Download a trial or buy Burn bootable image backup SSD (all partitions) to HDD (you could alternatively clone the first SSD to the second SSD directly but then you wouldn't have a backup) recover from backed up image to new SSD Alternatively you could do a direct clone using ...


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I had the same issue on my Samsung R580 laptop, with my mx100. I had used the Acronis softeare to clone my old drive onto the MX100. I had W8.1 64 bit. I solved it by updating the IDE ATA/ATAPI controller driver with the latest intel version. Now it all works perfectly!


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You can replace the Harddisk by an SSD in almost any iMac. I did it on my old 2009 iMac 24. Like you mentioned, you can also remove the Optical Drive and add a second Harddisk (or your SSD). You have the choice - they are both connected via standard SATA cables (maybe check if they are both SATA-3 compatible for the maximum speed). The best guide for ...


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With Windows 7, you can't get around the performance penalty of BitLocker if you enable it. With AES-NI, AnandTech reports it will be around 17.5% (versus 29.7% without it). With Windows 8 and an eDrive compliant SSD (which I think yours might be), BitLocker would use the hardware encryption on the SSD and essentially just manage the keys for you. There ...


0

An update: The PC has an SSD as the OS/primary boot disk, and 3 other HDD as secondary storage. I was focusing on the SSD as the root of the problem, but it turns out that one of the other disks was going bad, causing slowness. So for anyone else experiencing this issue with a similar setup, I suggest powering the machine down, disconnecting power cord, ...


0

I recently ran into the same problem myself. Very annoying, and I couldn't find any way to workaround it. There doesn't seem to be much official documentation confirming the restriction. The best I could find was this paragraph in a TechNet FAQ: You must keep both files (the parent VHD and the differencing VHD) in the same directory on a local volume ...


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I think it just count how many times a memory block has been written and keep a ranking, less used blocks are prioritary for the upcoming writes. But remember that a logical FS block is not attached always to the same physical block, it can be moved around the disk, so when there is a wear leveling and you rewrite a file, the physical blocks might not be the ...


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what about dd: srchost:$ dd if=/sourcefile of=/dev/ssd1 bs=1G count=1000 skip=[0,1000,...] move disk... dsthost:$ dd if=/dev/ssd1 bs=1G >> /finalfile


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Turns out Windows stores some metadata deep in its user files. I fixed it by Setting the registry values to point to the new location for Users, renaming my profile folder to .bak or whatever, deleting the User account and making a new one with the same name. After a login and logoff (to generate the folder), I went back onto the administrator account and ...


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I never tried it but you could use it like this: Install windows, activate smart response, delete windows, install linux. Try activating it from UEFI, not sure how.


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There are 2 important aspects here: TRIM and SandForce. Bitlocker, unlike TrueCrypt, supports TRIM (leaves empty parts empty and unencrypted). This has security implications but performance wise this allows the drive to do more garbage collecting and avoids performance degradation over time. SandForce controller is a popular SSD controller, which gains ...


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Here is a simple table which shows how the mixing of SATA II and SATA III devices at the same bus results: SATA 2 + SATA 3 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 2 = SATA 2 SATA 3 + SATA 3 = SATA 3 So does it have a sense to install SATA 3 SSD on SATA 2 notebook? A bit broad questions because it depends on circumstances. It hardly has a sense from the performance ...


0

Go to BIOS Menu by pressing F2 when you open your laptop. Go to Boot Options Disable the Secure Boot and go on with the "CSMOS and UEFI" Save Changes and Restart. If the loop still persist... Close laptop. Open it again. Press F4 until such time the screen turn black. There are two possible outcome after doing no. 3. a. ...


0

I would still suspect over temperature. If it's a laptop be sure not to block the vents on the bottom, e.g. the laptop sitting on soft surfaces. If it's a desktop/console type check again for ventilation ports. Those systems can be opened and cleaned using a compressed air can. Perhaps a fan is malfunctioning or has a loose electrical connection.


1

Open an elevated command prompt and type the items highlighted: Diskpart DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk (id) DISKPART> online disk (if the disk is not online) DISKPART> attributes disk clear readonly DISKPART> clean DISKPART> convert mbr (or gpt) DISKPART> create partition primary DISKPART> select part 1 DISKPART> active (if this is the boot ...


1

SSD's are usually reliable and do not crash easily. According to your claim that your SDD is working fine now, I would recommend that you use your SSD as you are using now and I don't think it would crash now. If I were you, I would continue using the SSD as normal like nothing happened. Anyways keep a backup of your data.( although there is no need to)


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The problem is defentley the drives's and you need to get some new ones. You can do this by finging out fore example your network cards name. Then type the name in to google followed by driver download Once you have done this click on one of the sights and download the driver. Then just install it like you would any program.


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If the disk is in your device manager all you need to do is go to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management > Disk Management. check if it has a letter e.g (G:) etc.


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As noted before, the hitachi will be hard pressed to go over 100MB/s in practical terms. All that "SATA3" labeling in HDDs is just affirming compatibility with the technology. The disks are as fast/slow as before. There are very few SSDs in the affordable range that can fully use the SATA3 6gig bandwidth. A cheap SSD drive may have a mediocre sequential ...


2

Yes, you would see a difference. The seek times of a SSD are very low compared to platter drives. Also, that interface transfer rate is not the actual read/write speed, which would be significantly lower (likely less than 100MB/sec)


0

Windows 7 laptop (work) would not hibernate - only sleep. Had been working but suddenly stopped. Changing options did not fix, neither did turning off\re-enabling hibernate. In the end this appears due to a corrupted BCD. Installed EASYBCD but it couldn't open the BCD. Said it was corrupted. Booted off a Windows 64 bit repair disk (can be created from ...


1

Let's start with the theoretical answer. USB 3.0 has a higher (with SuperSpeed much higher) potential throughput, so it should have a fundamental advantage. However, in most cases the drives you are plugging into USB 3.0 ports are actually SATA drives at heart with an external case and are therefore either translating the data or encapsulating the data for ...


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If you're looking to spend that kind of money for gaming, you best look at other places that actually create products solely for gaming: http://www.xidax.com/ As far as putting your own SSD in there, I have the previous model that you linked to, and I put my own SSD in, and turned the 2TB drive that came with it into storage only. After a while, dual ...


0

Many things can behind the error you get. Partition is physically larger vs. target partition (in your case the HDD partition to clone needs to be below 250 GB, including free space) After boot, the cloning software cannot see the partitions (check BIOS settings). Cloning software has no drivers for your drives. Best way to clone is to avoid that the HDD ...


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I just recently purchased a Dell XPS Laptop and it came with a USB recovery key. I replaced the drive with SSD and it recovered to that media fine. Your issue is with a Desktop and two drives you need to make sure the bios has the SSD as the Primary drive and the other drive as the slave 'secondary'. As it seems to only recover to the drive it see's as C? ...


1

The problem is that you do not get a CD with the operating system and it is already pre-installed. However, there is a partition containing the recovery data and best way is to simply reinstall Windows on your new SSD. In the BIOS, just set the SSD as the only boot drive once everything is installed. Once you're comfortable with the overall operation, you ...


1

Right now I'd recommend you to try GParted. It's a live CD similar to Clonezilla, but it provides you with a nice graphical interface rather than text based console menus. If possible, create a backup of your HDD first, since you'll have to modify the original partition. Essentially the steps involved should look like this: Shrink your HDD's partition to ...


0

First thing to make sure is that you have connected the SSD to SATA 1(nr.1 sata port) In some cases there can be multiple sata controller on the motherboards, but anyway, try to fiddle around with this. I have seen many cases where the boot is taking way to long and hangs for minutes while the windows logo animation(7) is running.. All of them solved by ...


1

If you created a partition directly from Windows installation disk, then you have a 100 MB boot drive, then you can't change your primary drive, even you can't clone your windows. windows disk manager doesn't show small partition, you should use a external bootable software like Acronis Disk Director if you want to see all partitions and Disks. and if you ...


0

Do not rely on super glue because : it gets "old" and fragile and if you try to move the chassis after an year it is possible that the SSD will bounce around and brake something else. you will have problems moving the ssd if you want after. the traces from the glue will void warranty. If you are in extreme emergency try attaching it with plastic or ...


0

Supergluing will void the warranty. Regardless of whether it might work, this is a decent enough reason on it's own not to do it.


-1

The hazard with superglue is that it gets hard and brittle over time, especially with heating. Eventually the thermal stresses will cause the joint to fail -- probably not in days or weeks, but easily months or a year or two.


-1

Don't use superglue because it will become fragile and eventually crack as the case vibrates. Try rubber bands, instead: http://lifehacker.com/378786/silence-your-hard-drive-with-elastic-suspenders EDIT: I know that SSDs don't make noise. I suggested this simply as a mounting method, regardless of the "silent" effects.


-1

Does the SSD expect the metal case of the drive to be electrically coupled to the grounded metal of the computer case? If so, superglue wouldn't provide that ground and may cause problems down the line. I don't know enough about the electrical works inside a PC to be able to say if this is actually a problem.


3

Definitely Not. The reason is that super glue is extremely brittle and has no tolerance for lateral force. The thermal expansion of the case vs the SSD as it heats up and expands at a different rate than the case will make short work of any super glue bond. Double sided foam tape is your best bet other than a proper adapter as it can bend as the metal ...


-1

No. Superglue needs moisture to harden. It does not work over large surfaces where air cannot get to. Use some glue that hardens chemically (epoxy, marine silicone)



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