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1

Your "automatic startup" issue may be a setting in your BIOS to automatically start the machine when AC power is restored - important for servers/machines that need to be on all the time. Regarding your "no display" problem: The Intel Xeon E3-1271 V3 does not have integrated graphics so you must install a graphics adapter into the machine. Source: ...


-1

This will decrease metadata size. sudo btrfs balance start -v -musage=0 /path


0

Make sure System Restore is reduced. In my case System Restore was currently configured to consume 50% of the storage space of the drive. To reconfigure, [Right Click]Computer --> Properties --> System Protection (on right) --> Configure.


1

You cannot necessarily expect the drive from an old PC to work in a new one because the hardware will be different. At the least, you need to delete the old network adaptor settings in control panel and then scan for new hardware.


1

I had the same issue with 840 pro. I contacted Samsung about it, and their response was to use windows 7 or 8.1 I wish I could be more help, but they haven't released compatible software yet.


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questions: would there be limitation in the processor or the PCIe controller or anything else I'm not considering? No. the only limitation is that you are force to use software raid.which can be unreliable at times however since they are SSD's they are more reliable than with physical drives. however be sure to backup data. Am i doing this totally wrong is ...


3

If Jack manages to destroy a harddrive when trying to install it, he should never be allowed to touch a screwdriver again. Not an answer, you say? Well, if he is reasonable compenent in the area of common sense, he should not have a problem upgrading to an SSD disk: Don't touch exposed electronics Touch the chassis of the computer so he has a neutral ...


0

I was able to get this to work only after I converted the new disk to GPT and Dynamic. These modes are new to me (i've only been using PCs since '82 ;-)), but they seem to be needed and not implemented automatically by the Restore. Use Diskpart Convert to do this. I think you can check the modes of your old disk to know how to match the new one. You'll ...


0

Sometimes higher capacity SSDs have faster speeds. The remaining part of the SSD beyond 64GB will be accessible in the Disk Management to partition as a separate drive.


0

if you have access to an linux computer / or are able to boot a linux live system from usb-stick or dvd try if it shows up with this - i had problems with windows7 and an unformatted SSD. i then formated it with linux - after this windows could use / reformat the disc. (so for me it seams windows has sometimes problems to find the SSD if it is not formated.) ...


0

Consider placing an RMA request and get your SSD replaced. It's the SSD that is bad and probably shipped faulty.


0

Simple solution. Download the free version of "Macrium Reflect" and follow the instructions to create a "bootable rescue media" and then follow the instructions to backup the SSD's original image to an external USB HDD or flash drive. Before replacing the SSD, reboot the computer on the rescue media by starting in ROM BIOS and selecting the rescue media to ...


0

I would suggest booting to an ubuntu live cd and using gparted to shrink your partition (provided there's enough free space). Then you can use ddrescue with the sparse option to take an image of your drive and store it to some temporary medium. Swap your disks and reverse your source and destination to restore the image.


1

Physically disconnecting HDD cable and reconnecting it made my HDD visible again. Then I just formatted my SSD and HDD and installed fresh copy of windows into SSD (I'm not going to use Intel RST again).


1

PCI-E slots can have 1, 4, 8 or 16 lanes. A CPU supports a specific number of lanes. The term "lane" is used because each lane is not shared with any other device, and this is why it's faster than standard PCI. I/O bandwidth on the older PCI standard was shared amongst all devices on the bus. A device like a PCI graphics adapter or heavily utilized ...


1

The lanes basically carry bandwidth in one direction or both (dual directional). The performance for gaming between 8x and 16x is negotiable with today’s current graphics cards, maybe a few FPS gain in certain situations. As for your set-up the first one should be fine by my calculations, the 16x and 8x slots will have no problems running the cards. This ...


0

to clear your doubts, hdds currently do not support trim. future hdds may support trim to improve data resillency. that is, trim will tell the hdd about useless sectors and the hdd can copy data to them or if a sector fails and there are no reserved sectors, it may be able to shrink its size


1

I just tested the M2 connector on a Latitude E5550 with a SSD and sadly I have to report that is not recognized in any way, even after trying every combination of settings in the BIOS (version A06). The M2 SSD I tested is brand new so I suppose it's not broken. I don't have any other device to test against to verify if it's really working or not. Just for ...


3

SSD and nand chip life is reduced by the writing to it, not the reading of it. Hashing files stored on the SSD will be reading them, even hashing it over and over again would be reading them, so a SSD would be very good for that type of operation. Even with writing, you would have to write massive quantities before that would be a real issue in modern SSD ...


0

It won't make a difference. SSDs might be faster, but if the bus it's connected on is slow, it won't make a difference. With 2 PCs I have, reading from internal SATA SSDs barely doubled read-performance under optimal conditions. With 2 other PCs (laptops) it made no difference. Also, SSDs have a limited number of writes they can make, but generally ...


-1

Hashing files is primarily a CPU based operation, so that will be the bottleneck. Purely from a harddrive point of view, SSD will allow for the files being read a lot faster, but I doubt this will be noticable compared to the hashing itself. (Depends on what hashing algorithm you're using, but still, reading the file is a lot faster than hashing it in 99% of ...


0

You can plug your HDD in your 1.5Gb/s port and it will run just fine since SATA is backwards compatible, but the speed of the drive will be limited to this 1.5Gb/s. In other words, if you install a SATA III 6Gb/s drive in a system that only supports SATA I 1.5Gb/s, then the performance will be limited to SATA I 1.5Gb/s levels. Hope this helps and cheers! :) ...


0

That's ugly. It won't hurt anything, the drive will just run at that speed. If you have an expansion port add one of these. 6gbps is probably what a your new drive supports. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16816124065&cm_re=sata_controller_6_gb--16-124-065--Product


1

Sounds like it's a BIOS "feature" <- yes, air quotes A typical Windows 7/8.x install will normally have your boot disk in AHCI mode. Based on what you are saying, the action of removing one drive is causing your BIOS to switch to IDE mode as a precaution because it recognized that a disk was removed. This is an issue because the registry setting in your ...


-1

You can't "Upgrade" to an older OS. That would be downgrading. Microsoft does not support downgrading, except on computers that came with Windows 8 preinstalled by the OEM. You would have to either dualboot (have both OS's installed side by side) or install Windows 7 over Windows 8. Installing the older OS over the newer one may require you to wipe the hard ...


0

The first thing you want to do is determine if it's an issue isolated to the PC you are working with. Do the same symptoms exist if you attach the SSD to a different PC? If so, then I'm afraid you have a faulty SSD. A firmware upgrade might help, but given that it's new, I'd send it back for replacement. If the problem only occurs on the PC you use, then ...


0

The problem could be either, but it does sounds like either the motherboard or PSU. A PSU is usually far less expensive, I recommend replacing it for a month (or until an issue) as a test. Often you can get one with the minimum wattage you need second-hand from a friend or reputable computer parts shop for cheap or free. Until you get hard data from that ...


0

If it persistently stays at 100 percent, then your SSD is failing. I once had a computer with a hard disk that did so. I removed the other HDDs, DVD drives, etc but I still had the same 100 percent problem. I then took it out of my computer and suddenly, disk usage was only 25 percent. I later realized that the case was not big enough to hold my 3.5 HDD and ...


1

I don't think this system is M.2/SSD - compatible. The problem with M.2 expansion slots is that it allows to use connector TYPE, not necessarily provide COMPATIBILITY. That is: depending on the implementation of the system board manufacturer it can be all, any or either of PCIe, SATA or USB. All depends on the wiring and components. There is nothing in the ...


0

I have recieved following response from Dell support (translated to english): In our tech-specs database I have found following supported disk models for this model (E5550): Haswell: 500GB 7200rpm HDD 128GB SSD Dell Fast Response Free Fall Sensor and HDD Isolation Broadwell: 500GB 7200rpm HDD 128GB SSD 256GB SSD 128GB mSATA 250GB 7200 HDD ...


1

Short answer: you will be fine either way, but I'd take the large SSD. Longer answer: Speed The bigger variants of the same model usually have better read and (especially) write speeds. Now, depending on the performance/number/kind of your SATA-controller on your mainboard, it might be faster to have 2 SSDs working in parallel. Or you create a ...


1

If you were willing to set up RAID 0, it would be worth getting multiple larger SSDs to have a large performance gain AND longevity. Say the 240GB SSD has a theoretical read/write speed of 500/380MB/s, if you added say 3 more SSDs into the mix, in a RAID 0 config, you would have a combined read/write speed of 2000/1520MB/s. The RAID config helps by ...


1

It will almost certainly work. You are replacing one SATA storage device with another SATA storage device. The only tricky parts could be: Does it actually use SATA internally (almost certain, but not mentioned on the page you linked to). Assuming it does use SATA: Does it physically fit?E.g. do I need something to hold the 2½ SSD in place if I ...


1

It's not an issue, it is normal. In that 10-15 seconds the system is already done filling the memory but it has to restart some scheduling mechanisms (O.S. is up&running but not yet started to schedule high level user apps) and switch to the logon screen. 10 secs is very normal.


1

Checking the obvious... Was the file being modified (still downloading) during the SSD checksums? If not, it sounds like a faulty SSD. Check the S.M.A.R.T. data.


2

After my initial bootrec.exe attempt didn't detect any Windows installation, I dug further into Microsoft's documentation. I booted into RE again and went to the command line to load diskpart: > diskpart Selected the disk: DISKPART> list disk DISKPART> select disk 0 Selected the partition called "SYSTEM_DRV" (FAT32 filesystem) and assigned it ...


2

Will A PCIe Sata Controller help me circumvent AHCI woes? It might. I does not need to. I should though. Now a bit more verbose: AHCI needs to be supported and enabled on the device and its support. This includes the BIOS. Several older chipsets (ICH7 era) did have AHCI capability but not the necessary support in the BIOS to actually use it. Using a ...


0

having less than 50 reps, I can't make comments In most cases your SATA HDD only needs to be checked using "chkdsk". To do so: Click on Start button type in: cmd right click on it (in the results) and click on "Run as an administrator" let's say your your SATA HDD partition letter is D: So in the command prompt type: chkdsk d: /f /r This may take ...


0

For anyone who hasn't found a fix yet: I was having a similar problem. Installed a new SSD and BIOS recognized it from the boot menu and allowed me to start it from there manually, but would give me the "Reboot and Select proper Boot device or Insert Boot Media in selected Boot device and press a key" message when I tried to just turn on the computer. My fix ...


3

This is no issue. First of all, SSDs have greatly improved during the last years. Overprovisioning and wear levelling (and to a small amount, the TRIM command, though not applicable in your case) have made them quite suitable as heavy-duty, general-purpose disks. I am not using anything but SSD on my development PC (which regularly does a lot of compiling) ...


1

If your hard drive is failing (SSD or HDD), then it doesn't matter what you do to try to repair the OS. I have seen cases like you're describing, and your internet research is most likely correct. My recommendation is to back up everything, if it's not already too late, and replace the hard drive ASAP. However, if you really want to be sure, you can ...


-1

You will want to set a few SATA adapter cards as your SATA controller likely can't handle all of those drives at once. You could use SATA multipliers but that distributes the bandwidth, resulting in slower throughput of data. RAID cards are typically more expensive than SATA adapter cards. If you are not going to be setting up a RAID, you should use a ...


2

To get the greatest throughput, your going to want something hooked to the bus. I would recommend an add-in RAID card for SATA drives, similar to this model which boasts 10 SATA connectors: Don't RAID the drives together, just have individual volumes. I've have no experience with that brand, but that single card could get you where you need to be for ...


2

All following recommendations are given assuming you're the only user of the PC. If it's not the case, make sure to set up appropriate filesystem permissions on tmpfs in same place you'll create directories. There are chrome cache directories under ~/.config/google-chrome/Default. On Windows, these dirs are Cache, Media Cache, IndexedDB and GPUCache. Not ...


4

Let's assume your import involves no updates and no deletions. So you are doing all insertions. This should only be writing new data to the transaction log. This means as data is added, it is always being written to a new sector. There might be some buffers/swap that gets churned/written to multiple times, but ignoring that, all of those inserts would ...


-2

As the poster of this writeup on SSDs said, what is really harmful is again and again writing small chunks of data. bits are stored into {1,2,3}-bit cells. These have limited lifespan. cells are grouped into [2-16]KB pages (smallest writeable unit) pages are grouped into (128-256 page-)blocks (smallest eraseable unit) for a page to be rewritten, it---and ...


1

If you are truly interested in figuring out the details then you will need the following question answered: On average how many bytes are in each row? If you can tell me that there are 10 columns, each column is varchar(100), and the encoding is UTF-8 then I can guess at worst case scenario that you have 4,000 bytes worth of data per row and add some more ...


17

Reads are fine, and SSD's can have their bits read from without any detrimental effect. Writes are another matter. Clearing a bit affects the integrity of the bit and after a lot of sequential writes, the bit will stop accepting new writes altogether. It can however still be read. Let me just say that the write limits on new enterprise drives are huge. ...


24

It really is not a straightforward answer to this. SSDs do not care about continuous writes as much as how many times any particular sector is overwritten. When SSDs first came out, something like SQL was a bad word as the operating system in general treated the drive like a traditional HDD and failures were very frequent. Since then, drives have become ...


12

Writing to SSDs isn't necessarily bad. It's the writing and rewriting of a single block that's bad. Meaning if you write a file delete it then write it again, or make small amounts of changes to a file over and over again. This causes wear on the SSD's. Databases would definitely fit into this category. However according to this article, petabytes of ...



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