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This is best understood with small examples. In these exmples the connections are structured like this: Local Server--(LAN)--Terminal-----(SSH,usually via Internet)-----Tunnel Endpoint--(LAN)--Remote Machine You use local port forwarding if you want to tunnel to a certain remote machine/port, reachable by the tunnel endpoint you have ssh access to. Therby, ...


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Name: SSH Protocol: TCP Host IP: 127.0.0.1 (I also tried blank) Host Port: 22 Guest IP: 127.0.0.1 (I tried blank here as well) Guest Port: 4022 This sets up a port forward from the host to the guest, not the other way around. It would accept connections to port 22 on the host, and forward those connections to port 4022 on the guest. If you want to ...


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which user do you use? If you use the default cyg_server user, then check the /etc/passwd file to check the user's login shell. Check if the login shell is exist. If everything is ok, then show your ssh -vvv result :-)


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Check all allowed public keys by cat ~/.ssh/authorized_keys Find and remove your particular public keys to revoke access.


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You could always transfer files to the intermediate server and then copy it from there. However if the intermediate server has space limitations and cannot hold large files, then you need to create a tunnel through the intermediate server to the second server. Creating a tunnel through putty, 1) your ssh config should point the intermediate server like ...


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Host-only network for a vm usually add an additional subnet (192.168.A.x) to the host machine with a virtual network adapter. You should check which ip address is assigned to the host and which to the guest in this virtual network. on mac open a terminal and use "ifconfig" or "ip addr" to get ip addresses for the host. On linux do the same and view ip ...



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