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You can use rsub and rmate to edit remote files in your local Sublime Text over ssh. You need to install the rsub package in Sublime Text (with Package Manager) forward port 52698 via ssh, use ssh -R 52698:localhost:52698 ... or set your config create/edit ~/.ssh/config and chmod 600 ~/.ssh/config (to avoid a permissions problem) add (replace ...


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I had to modify @stsquad's answer. It was failing for me because the export command could not set the SSH_CONNECTION variable. I had to wrap the value of SSH_CONNECTION in quotes. function tmux_sync_env { ssh_auth_sock=`tmux showenv | grep "^SSH_AUTH_SOCK"` ssh_connection=`tmux showenv | grep "^SSH_CONNECTION"` export ${ssh_auth_sock} ...


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I had SSH set up with Cygwin and in my case it was the Windows firewall that caused exactly this error, so make sure to allow connections to port 22.


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OpenSSH version coming with Cygwin supports ECDSA keys since… since SSH itself supports them. If you have Cygwin installation up and running, you can make a simple link or batch script to mintty /usr/bin/ssh …whatever options you might need… and have very much PuTTY-like visuals with all the power of OpenSSH. If you don't have Cygwin setup, I suggest ...


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Are the computers behind the router NAT? Are the computers on wifi or wired? Do they have static IPs? One possible cause might be "client isolation". Most wifi routers support "wireless isolation" or "client isolation" as a form of security feature. This makes all wifi clients that connect to the router not see any other clients on the network. Check that ...


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The SSH protocol has numerous authentication methods. The password and keyboard-interactive are two of them. The password authentication is a simple request for a single password. There's no specific prompt sent by the server. So it's the client that chooses how to label the prompt (The "user@host's password" prompt is the OpenSSH ssh client prompt). The ...


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I wouldn’t recommend running ssh-add or expect in a cron job as it’s excessively complicated to run it in the limited environment that cron uses for executing its jobs and I’d prefer not to store passwords in the crontab. Rather than using your regular SSH key, I’d create a new key that is only ever to be used to run the command you want to be run by cron. ...


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Alternate answer I just thought I’d take a closer look at your expect scripts and I noticed that they’re missing the spawn command: #!/usr/bin/expect -f spawn /usr/bin/ssh-add /Users/myusername/.ssh/id_rsa expect "Enter passphrase for /Users/myusername/.ssh/id_rsa:" send "mypassphrase\n"; interact From the expect manual: spawn [args] program [args] ...



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