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0

What ssh options are you using? If you're not already, you should consider the following two -o StrictHostKeyChecking=no -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null You can put these in your ~/.ssh/config file or use them together on the CLI. The other thing I was wondering is could it be that your instance is terminating and re-provisioning? That would change the ...


0

Most VNC viewers support a listen-mode, where the viewer waits for a connection from a server; because you can make connections from B to A, start the listening viewer on A, then at some later point, you can initiate a connection from B to A by starting the server in a way that tells it to connect to a viewer immediately, instead of acting as a typical ...


1

Download zenmap and scan your website for open ports. When you find a few, make sure your router has those ports open using this tool: http://www.portchecktool.com. Finally, try: 1) Restarting your router, or 2) Downloading Tor to anonymize your traffic and prevent the server from recognizing you...just in case entering your password incorrectly caused you ...


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we got there in the chat LocalPi>ssh -L *:5678:127.0.0.1:9091 remoteuser@127.0.0.1 -p 16864 then on chromebook, http://localpi_IP:5678 So the remote pi had done an SSH -R creating port 16864 on the localpi. He was already able to get a terminal to his raspberry pi, doing localpi>ssh remoteuser@127.0.0.1 -p 16864 We added a -L to open port ...


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Solved, Using Vagrant and Ansible, Running Ansible Manually ansible -i hosts default -m setup --user vagrant -i .vagrant/provisioners/ansible/inventory/vagrant_ansible_inventory --private-key=.vagrant/machines/default/virtualbox/private_key


1

Well, WinSCP does just that, doesn't it? And as the linked docs would promise, can do it from command line only too as per /upload parameter.


0

The problem could be that /etc/sudoers has "requiretty" ... which means you need a tty to run the sudo command. One fix is to remove this requirement for the specific user by adding this to /etc/sudoers on the machine(s): Defaults:someuser !requiretty


1

The simple answer to your query is: add one of the follwoing lines to your /etc/sshd/sshd_config file, AllowUsers root@192.168.0.1 AllowUsers root@192.168.0.? The first line allows root to login from a single IP address, the second one from the whole subnet 192.168.0.0/24. Now restart your ssh daemon, and you are good to go. Even if ...


0

Instead of permitting root login, try this instead: Create a standard user, or use one that exists. You now have 2 choices su sudo For choice 1, login to the user account you just created, and run su. This will allow you to type the root password, and gain root. Beware you need to execute exit then logout to logout from root, then disconnect. For ...


0

If your ssh -v output on the client shows that it's "Offering public key" and then moves on to "Next authentication method: password" without an apparent error, here are a few things to try (these work for me on CentOS and Fedora): If your server sshd_config has StrictModes yes (usually the default) then you have to obey some permissions rules: on the ...


1

View open SSH connections per user/machine along with the servers they are connected to When network traffic leaves your system, unless you are physically connected to another system via a crossover cable, it traverses at least one intermediate system. Software on these intermediate systems can record metadata about each packet, including source ...


1

Secure Shell SSH by definition is secure as all traffic is encrypted whilst in transit across all networks. Wiretapping is not something that you have to worry about with SSH. The entire purpose of SSH is to create an encrypted connection between the client and the server to ensure that none of the information transmitted between them can be seen on any ...


1

rsync always has to build the list of files to sync, but "Over SSH" is the key difference here. When you point rsync at a SSH server, it can ask the server to create such a list, by running another copy of rsync on the server. That way, both the client & the server only need to read / rescan their own local copies, and only exchange a short list of ...


2

What you are asking for is quite difficult to achieve without reasonably extreme measures like a VPN (a real VPN with a client virtual Network Adapter, not a application layer ssh or ssl tunnel), an upstream funnel device like SafePlug, or a TOR transparent proxy. Even then, the certificate issue may not be addressable, unless you use an application layer ...


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I use the -key:07 option on the commandline to launch caffiene.. Seems to stop the Putty problem. just put it in a bat file caffiene.exe -key:07


0

No, you don't need to regenerate the keys. Edit /etc/ssh/sshd_config. Look for LogLevel. The default is info. Here are your choices (lowest to highest): QUIET, FATAL, ERROR, INFO, VERBOSE, DEBUG, DEBUG1, DEBUG2 and DEBUG3 Then restart sshd service. Remember that DEBUG values violate user privacy, as stated on the sshd_config manpage. You can see the ...


0

You don't need to regenerate keys when IP addresses change. You may need to accept the certificate again, but you would need to accept a new certificate anyway. If a different host connects to an IP from which you had previously connected, you will get a warning that a different key is associated with the IP address. The message should include ...


0

For ssh password prompt, try to use ansible/ansible-playbook -k/--ask-pass. It will call sshpass(FYI, maybe OSX don't ship with sshpass). For host key checking, add [defaults] host_key_checking = False in ~/.ansible.cfg or /etc/ansible/ansible.cfg. Or export ANSIBLE_HOST_KEY_CHECKING=False just like this manual says. For ssh keys deploy, use ...


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I was able to solve the problem by: removing the brew basically giving the argument for UseDNS as no vi /etc/sshd_config UseDNS no service sshd restart by unset SSH_AUTH_SOCK and then do ssh


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The apparent problem is that you are typing Ctrl+V before the Esc key. Control/V is usually the lnext (literal-next) character, which tells the terminal driver to not do anything special for the following character. That lets it pass through to the application (or shell) which ignores it, and likewise the Capital/O likewise is ignored (or legal in some ...


0

In addition to all of the above, one can always check the sshd log file: /var/log/auth.log


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The steps to make this work are as follows (with firefox as default browser in the windows vm): Configure ssh keys in putty and save the session with connection info to your host operating system Create a batch script that runs plink.exe (command line version) like so: set PATH=C:\Program Files (x86)\PuTTY\ plink.exe -load mySavedSession "DISPLAY=":0.0 ...


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Although not the issue here, in my case my config included ControlPath /home/barry/.ssh/tmp/%h_%p_%r and I'd forgotten to create /home/barry/.ssh/tmp first.


0

Have you tried enabling KeepAlive in Putty? http://www.nth-design.com/2010/05/10/using-keepalive-in-putty/


0

Check your router settings for "bridged mode" or a way to disable DHCP. This will basically turn it into a switch and combine the two networks into one.


2

Router is a device which separate VLAN, unless you have access to modify the config ISP wifi router (Since this is maintained by ISP so usually you don't have access to it), this can't be done. EDIT: Just reviewed your network environment and this can be done, as my understanding, you are currenting having the following networking configuration: ISP ...


0

If you keep your solution of having each command run in a separate SSH session, you can speed up the time required to start each session by using an already-open connection. This means you only have to pay the connection overhead once, making subsequent sessions quick to start. The simplest way to set it up is by opening the first connection with this: ssh ...


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If your network does not allow incoming connections (i.e. there is a firewall you don't control which is blocking all incoming ports), then you will have to use an intermediate server (which is what teamviewer uses). If you have SSH access to a remote computer you can set up an ssh reverse tunnel to make your local services available remotely. Otherwise, ...


0

I solved the problem and post the answer here for posterity if someone else has the same issue. My host is linux and guest windows. QEMU is launched with -qmp tcp:192.168.0.10:4444,server,nowait to enable telnet access to monitor. To bind the devices you want at lauch, add -device usb-host,productid=12850,id="FancyKeyboard" -device ...


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Wrap your command in a script that will notify you when it's done. If you have an SMTP server available that will accept outgoing emails from your server, you could use that. The below example will execute your-command, capture its output and stderr to a file, then use malix to mail the results. There's certainly a much better way of making sure the file ...


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There are two parts: does the terminal support escape sequences which can change its titlebar does your shell support embedded escape sequences which can be used for this purpose. According to these informational pages, SecureCRT does support xterm's titlebar control sequences: Displaying Text In The SecureCRT Title Bar Xterm Escape Sequences Not all ...


-1

As I am trying to ssh from my local machine to VM, so instead of ssh mapr@localhost -p 2222 command would br ssh mapr@<IP of VM> -p 2222


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I shamelessly asked the question on serverfault as well. Here's the answer: http://serverfault.com/questions/700855/ssh-session-stuck-after-some-time-of-iddleness


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try replacing your command string with: kill -9 `ps aux | grep cassandra | grep -v "grep " | awk '{print $2}'` This will prevent grep from appearing in the results you are trying to parse. What is actually happening, is that your parsing is picking up your grep process, and attempting to kill it, but it has already completed. When you grep a string that ...


1

I have had a similar trouble with PuTTY and screen (I couldn't use Ctrl modifier). The solution I've found was KiTTY - the fork of PuTTY, which is better maintained (last update from 2015/06/02 22:02). My problem with Ctrl key has gone. By default, Kitty uses Fn keys for its own shortcuts, but you can configure it other way, so Fn keypresses will be sent ...


0

Its an old question without a valid response, hence answering it now. The response - "'unknown': I need something more specific" is mostly coming from ncurses / curses library. The reason you are getting it is - there is no valid terminal at the remote. To get rid of such issues, use -t (or -ttt) with your ssh command. ssh -ttt user@host 'sudo command'


0

After hours it's finally done! I just create new user like this : useradd -ou 0 myuser -p [#hash-password] and then I changed PermitRootLogin yes in this path : /etc/ssh/sshd_config easy as pie :)


2

Usually one does not create users "with root privileges" that way. One creates a normal account, with a non-zero UID, and uses tools like su, sudo, ksu, pkexec and such, to obtain the root privileges when needed. For that, just useradd myuser would be enough. ... That said, the current problem is most likely that useradd -p expects the hashed password, ...


1

Is there a way to tell an existing process to change what X server it should be using? Not that I know of, in X. However, there two applications, Xpra and NX, which were designed to allow exactly that. For instance, Xpra states: Xpra is 'screen for X', and more: it allows you to run X programs, usually on a remote host and direct their display to ...


1

If you are able to ssh into host from remote, than you need to check the firewall on host, if ssh ports (22) are forwarded to vm. There is a similar question here. There, it is the ufw firewall, which needs to have a rule like ufw route allow 2222/tcp to 192.168.130.128 port 22 to allow connection to host on port 2222 and forward tcp to vm guest at ip ...


4

Servername is not a real server but a load-balancer that re-directs you to one of the servers in the pool. At least.. That is what it looks like. 2 ways to get the same real machine: 1) Talk to the server administrator and ask nicely. They may have a way to make this happen if you really need this functionality for your university work. 2) After you ...


8

you could probably ssh into the desired machine once you've already ssh'd into the server, as all the computers are likely connected under a NAT and probably know each others' names. so e.g. me@me: ~ $ ssh me@uni_server logging in etc me@random_machine_in_server: ~ $ ssh me@desired_machine


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-> Jump to the update As mentioned in the man ufw found here I would change the appearance of rule 4 to come before rule 3. Rule ordering is important and the first match wins. Therefore when adding rules, add the more specific rules first with more general rules later. First allow incomming tcp on 2222, and route to 192.168.130.128:22 Then ...


1

Normally not - that could be seen as a security issue. You can only get the address of the machine originating the current connection (or of the closest firewall behind which the machine resides if it is behind one or more firewalls) (machine02 in your example) from the SSH_CONNECTION env var: SSH_CONNECTION Identifies the client and server ends ...


1

I solved the similar problem I had in OS X Terminal settings: Profiles, Advanced, and changed the "Declare terminal as" drop box to xterm-256color.


0

If you have a password, and want to simply use the password to login, here is how you do it. To use ONLY password authentication and NOT use Public-key, and NOT use the somewhat misleading "keyboard-interactive" (which is a superset including password), you can do this from the command line: ssh -o PreferredAuthentications=password user@example.com


0

In the scenario where you have many keys, you will invariably run into the "Too many Authentication Failures" error. If you have a password, and want to simply use the password to login, here is how you do it. To use ONLY password authentication and NOT use Public-key, and NOT use the somewhat misleading "keyboard-interactive" (which is a superset ...


0

The problem is running a binary for a different processor architecture. You can use objdump (from binutils) to check architecture of binaries. You can use uname to check architecture of a machine. e.g. I encountered this error "cannot execute binary file" when installing FF.Communicator - a firefox plugin for chrome (so I can run pages that use java ...


0

I suppose your virtual network is configured for NAT. In the port forwarding rules just leave blank the two address fields. Test connecting to port 4022 of your host from another machine.


3

Previously the fingerprint was given as a hexed md5 hash. Starting with OpenSSH 6.8 the fingerprint is now displayed as base64 SHA256 (by default). You can't compare these directly. They also added a new configuration option FingerprintHash. You can put FingerprintHash md5 in your ~/.ssh/config to revert to the old (less secure) default or just use this ...



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