Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If you have physical access to the box you can fix it as root, without - probably not unless you have another user account on the box that isn't in enforced password change and that can sudo or su to root


0

You should investigate how to use Capistrano to deploy your PHP code instead of reinventing the wheel with a Bash script like this. Capistrano is basically a series of Ruby scripts that in-turn then run a series of Bash commands to deploy code from a code repository to a remote server. Although Capistrano is mainly used in the Ruby development world, but I ...


0

Are you using Linux? If so, there's a hack called reptyr that might allow you to recover some control here. If you're on another OS, you're probably out of luck, although there was some talk a while ago of adding a fully working way of shipping processes between ttys to NetBSD.


0

You cannot store the passphrase for your private key permanently using Pagent, PuTTY's SSH key agent. You will have to store it unencrypted if you wish to avoid retyping the passphrase again and agian. I suggest protecting all your keys with one standard easy to type passphrase.


1

You do not need Administrator rights to register the ssh:// mapping. Just create the mapping in your account registry hive. Instead of: [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\ssh] use: [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\ssh] Except for the root key, the rest is the same as with machine-wide registration. See for example Can PuTTY open SSH link similar to Terminal for ...


0

This might not be the most elegant way to approach this, but—since you are using Mac OS X—the only thing I can think of if you are already remoted into the other machine is to issue an SSH command back to your host like this. The big prerequisite is you would need to have your SSH server up and running on your Mac OS X laptop and make sure your router’s ...


2

You can make use of SSH reverse tunnel. It works like this; do this on the machine you are using here, remote_server is the name of the remote server: ssh -R 13000:localhost:22 remote_server And display in image on your local machine from the remote server: ssh <USERNAME>@localhost -p 13000 "DISPLAY=:0 ristretto <IMAGE>" EDIT: There may be ...


0

At least with Bash, ssh with the "-t" argument (e.g. ssh server1 -t '/foo/bar/script.sh') will run a remote command without executing "~/.bashrc" (the bash equivalent to "~/.cshrc/login").


1

It should be possible to accomplish what you desire with a subsystem, but I am fairly certain it will require writing a custom sshd binary, as the OpenSSH code only provides the sftp subsystem, and merely sets up an extendable framework for additional definitions.


0

After a lot of googling and trial-and-error I found the solution on this very long discussion. Summary: Informix tries to run a visual bell, but instead of using the BEL code (which is bel=^G in the terminfo file for xterm) it uses flash (which is flash=E[?5h$<100/>\E[?5l in the terminfo file for xterm). Not sure if this is a PuTTY bug (it knows ...


0

You can use su - youruser when you are logged in over ssh. This will reinitialize the environment for the user. Actually you initialize a new session with a new environment.


1

If you are behind a firewall please try this before: git config --global url."https://".insteadOf git://


0

If you are using bash you may set up an alias ssh='LANG= command ssh' to disable LANG passing to the other servers.


0

It's a somewhat dirty but easy solution, but what about using nc? On the Raspberry you create a script that loops the command "nc your_pub_ip port1 | sh | nc your_pub_ip port2". On your local end you start "nc -l port1" and "nc -l port2". You'll be able to type in a command with the first nc and you'll see the response on the second nc.


1

You need to execute the output of ssh-agent to apply the changes to your current shell: eval $(ssh-agent -s)


1

Yes. First as a side note, you can probably write an applescript to switch WIFI on/off. Since you can code and use terminal, just execute the script before/after. Just make sure WIFI is above Ethernet in System Preferences -> Network, so the system will use WIFI when both are available. Besides that, you can use WIFI interface like a proxy. In this ...


0

Here, it sounds like what you need is this. ssh -A -t me@bastion.com ssh -A -t me@destionation_server This will make a bastion your jump host. Before this will work you need to place your keys in authorized_keys file in directory .ssh for each server respectively. To be honest I think you think it's more complicated than it really is. It just two ...


1

you should be able to set a proxy on this wifi network and or set an exit node that you use for github and ONLY use it for GH much like a VPN (but only need to uncheck use this connection for network resources (aka if its on local lan its NOT used).


0

At a minimum you would need BOTH sets of keys on bastion host so both sessions could happen there concurrently. How actually do you mean by "merge" as in monitor both in a single tty?


0

I finally figured out what happened. The problem was "The guest has two network adapters, one is bridged and has a public IP address which is 128.x.x.219, the other works in NAT mode and has a local IP address which is 192.168.106.129." It seems we should not do that. We should not have two virtual adapters on the same VM, with one of them working in bridged ...


0

I have a 2-step approach, that will work: First, transfer ALL the files as usual with rsync. Then, start another rsync-step with the --remove-source-files option but execute it only on the old video files. ways to do this (feeding it only the old files): Use ZSH instead of bash, see the answer here: rsync N newest files in a directory. For example, ...


0

It is possible to add users with a shell that will only allow utilities such as scp, rsync and other nice utilities: rssh I used it on my webhosting service way back, and it did the trick. Users were unable to log in and get a shell, but they were still able to upload stuff properly. Add them as normal users, but give them rssh as a shell with chsh, and ...


0

Try to write your command in a file on your machine (say command.clp) and run ssh accout@remote_server 'connect clp' < command.clp As an alternative, you can start your command.clp file with connect clp line followed by Smash CLP commands. In this case all you need to run is ssh accout@remote_server < command.clp


0

There's no way to initiate a file transfer back to/from local Windows from a SSH session opened in PuTTY window. Though the latest version of PuTTY (0.64) supports connection-sharing. While you still need to run a compatible file transfer client (pscp or psftp), no new login is required, it automatically (if enabled) makes use of an existing PuTTY session. ...


1

There's different check to do: If you have a monitor that you can connect on the raspberry open a command line on the raspberry and Check its IP with ifconfig or ip addr. Is it really 10.190.135.xxx that you want to connect to. Check that you can ping your gateway and the pc you want to connect from. If you installed iptables check with sudo iptables ...


0

It's because you're using sudo which is using different RSA keys (root private keys), instead of your user private keys. So either don't use sudo, or add RSA keys of root account on the remote. To verify this, add -vvv parameter to ssh command to see the verbose output. You may also use ssh-agent and ssh-add to add your user keys, so you can be properly ...


0

I have used an SSH tunnel before, but now I use http://proxmate.dave.cx/ You can install the extension and then install the youtube plugin and it will automatically proxy while watching youtube but all other traffic will be direct. This is easier for me, but may not be what you want.


2

Assuming that the problem is NOT the setup in your Linux machines, the connection might be blocked by some firewall in the network. I found this solution ("reverse SSH"), that works by letting your girlfriend SSH to you first and then using THIS connection to ssh back to her: http://www.vdomck.org/2005/11/reversing-ssh-connection.html The simple setup ...


0

If you talking about remote shell, you mean that you can execute commands there, in other words, you have direct access. In this case you can simply use ssh connection for each remote window. You can tell there something like: "Hey, but there are no way to have multiple windows for each remote server!" and it is true, due to ssh restrictions. But, you ...


0

You can configure jumphosts using a ProxyCommand in ~/.ssh/config, assign hostnames for nics in /etc/hosts ssh-chaining


1

I'm not familiar with sshuttle, but from skimming its usage page and some of its source, I don't believe it supports that. If you were using ssh directly (with the -L or -R flags), you'd need to supply an address as the optional first argument (referred to as bind_address in the manual page). For example, ssh -L 50513:example.com:80 will choose an address ...


-1

You should be able to bind which interface/IP you want to the service. For example, in SSH you can modify the ListenAddress in your sshd_config file.


-1

Try using a "ProxyCommand nc %h %p" in ~/.ssh/config UPDATE I have been experiencing a similar problem ever since I updated to Mac OS X Mountain Lion. However, a combination of Mac OS X (stock ssh client) and Asus Router and external server (over WAN) causes login to timeout, for me. If I try to connect using my Mobile hot-spot (skip Asus Router) to same ...


2

Try fusermount -u remote to unmount the mount point.


0

Well you didn't mention that you port forwarded the SFTP port but one could assume that when your terminaling in you are doing so remotely and so the ports must be forwarded. Other than that, SFTP and SSH by default use the same port IIRC (22) so you may want to set at least one of those to a non-default port so the servers aren't overlapping. Also ...


0

In the general tab of in the options of gnome-terminal, there is a configration item to specify the characters that should be selected, when selecting (with doubleclick): Add a single space to the list. Now, with ls -Q the whole part that is inside the quotes will be selected. But notice, now, a space no longer delimits words! It may solve that problem, ...


1

Synology has an Auto Block IP feature : https://originwww.synology.com/en-us/knowledgebase/tutorials/615 That should sort you out. What I'd recommend though is to configure your firewall to only allow access to port 22 from your works IP address (find the external IP address here) as it will eventually get ridiculous the number of IP's listed in auto ...


0

So, this is a bit of question necromancy, but since I got here, and then realised what the answer was after reading the first answer, I figured I'd put this here for other wayward souls. Because of the way scp works (over stdin/stdout over ssh AFAIK), having a naive bashrc that prints messages breaks the formatting scp is expecting, and thus the connection. ...


0

As far as I know some countries manipulate with DNS table. By default Firefox uses regular DNS - not the proxy one. Go to about:config and set network.proxy.socks_remote_dns = true.


0

I don't think there is an easy way to do this on a mass scale. And you don't really mention the scope of these ssh connections. Terminal only? Might make things a bit easier. Run ssh -NR 2210:localhost:22 intermediaryuser@intermediary.remote.machine.tld as someuser on the machine behind the firewall. I'm assuming 2210 is available on the intermediary ...


1

From your home machine run the following: curl https://jenkins-ci.org/debian/jenkins-ci.org.key|ssh <username>@<ssh server> 'cat > jenkins-ci.org.key' Replace <username>@<ssh server> with proper ssh information. Example: curl https://jenkins-ci.org/debian/jenkins-ci.org.key|ssh bob@myserver.com 'cat > jenkins-ci.org.key' ...


2

To rephrase your question, based on one of your later comments, you want to access [website] from a server that hasn't access to that URL using a personal computer with no open ports as tunnel - Helio At first glance, what you are asking for seems impossible. Upon closer inspection, what you need is some highly advanced networking voodoo. Specifically: ...


0

This might make things easier. For one, it might help to have a tmux configuration file with lines like: new-session -s mysession "bash -i" #window 0, run bash new-window -n IRC "irssi -n x_vi_r -c DALnet; bash -i" #irssi in window 1 new-window -n Diag "tail -f /var/log/maillog" # window 2, run maillog tail split-window -h "top" ...


-1

as jmreicha said. start tmux on the remote server, but instead of connecting to that server with ssh... use mosh. you will never lose connection again, even if you let the computer sleep for weeks at a time, or change from home wifi to mobile and then onto free public wifi. who needs scripts eh :)


0

Probably, my answer will supplement the previous one. You can find modified database that will allow you to use Alt+Fx, Ctrl+Fx, Shift+Fx, Alt+Shift+Fx combinations here. Instructions to use it are here. Of course, terminal should support them. These keycodes are from Linux variant of console (supported in konsole).


1

IPv6 clients are typically configured trough Stateless address autoconfiguration (SLAAC), not DHCP. Clients tend to rotate addresses often,which is why you're probably seeing the messages.


0

I can’t answer honestly about why the IPv6 IP is listed there. I’m still learning some SSH things. But the changing IP is most likely due to the use of a DHCP server on the network (most likely a home router). Everytime the desktop is off the IP address it was using will become available after a set time. When another device comes on the network the router ...


0

As long as you don't allow the SSH server to be accessible from outside your network, which it doesn't seem like it is. Then you should be ok. If you want to add increased security from within your network and the SSH server you can lookup using certificates to log in to it. Generally yes, if the attacker can not get past your router then your network ...


0

It's for xming, but perhaps this faq is of some help? The idea behind it is the same but using xming instead of cygwin on your local machine. https://wiki.utdallas.edu/wiki/display/FAQ/X11+Forwarding+using+Xming+and+PuTTY


2

This is what Plink is meant for: plink user@host "echo this ran remotely"



Top 50 recent answers are included