New answers tagged

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Some "datacenters" offer the gigabit connection shared between several servers. Thus when others transfer a lot of data, your connection speed will decrease. First verify your plan details - that you indeed have guaranteed 1 gigabit speed at all times. DDoS cannot be ruled out - but datacenters generally can identify and block this kind of traffic - so they ...


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Problem (sort of) solved! Thanks to @grawity I investigated the output of traceroute6 and found out that the IPv6 I used did not work. When using ip a show enp0s3 I get two IPv6 addresses and from what I read on the internets the first is one derived from my system's mac address, the second a more anonymous one. Somehow the latter does not seem to work ...


1

You'll need to first disable the Sharing settings under System Preferences -> Sharing and turn them off on the left by unchecking them which will automatically remove them from the Firewall allowed list.


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Why not just create a small shell script launcher on the far system and run it: #!/bin/bash export ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0 exec $ORACLE_HOME/Opatch/opatch lsiinventory Save that into a file called something like "oplauncher" chmod 755 it, and use ssh to logon and run it.


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In closing, the solution was to better control the initial environment between the time of successful authentication, and the calling of rbash. This was achieved with a wrapper shell which calls a "clean" bash with the flags --restricted, --rcfile ..., --noprofile, etc.... and a default case which logs the attempt at execution before exiting. With ...


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You should always generate a random key-pair, and you should always keep the private-key private. It is impossible for an adversary to find the private-key by only knowing what the public-key is. So no-one on the internet should be able to find your private-key.


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The password is raspberry (note the missing p).


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It depends on desired level of trust to system. From optimistic side: If everything happens really as You say. I can't say this system compromised. More correct it unwanted access. As long intruder can't get root or other privileged user access. At minimum You do everything right. pessimistic side: If You suspect and afraid that intruder make ...


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Well if the system containing the private key is ever accessed unauthorised then you should treat the key as such too. There's no way you can 'share' the private key, and you can't go from public -> private anyway so what you're asking is 'impossible' (within the constraints of PKI). Simply by trying to search for the private key (or some subset of it) you'...


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You need to check route table on your new server and make sure that your default route goes through em interface.


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You may consider using SSH tunneling. Create few tunnels from your RPi device to each other you need access to, and you can SSH to them using local RPi ports. The problem is if device reboots your connection will break.


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I wrote a small shell function that does exactly that and can be placed e.g. in your .bashrc. It replaces ping and does the lookup of the last argument (host) in .ssh/config before calling the original /bin/ping, i.e. ping -c 2 <host> will call /bin/ping -c2 <hostname> where <hostname> is the matching IP/hostname in .ssh/config. If no ...


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OpenSSH ssh have a switch -b, which allows you to specify to which local IP address it should bind when connecting to the remote host. There is also respective BindAddress option which you can store in your ssh_config. Let's say your wireless IP address is 192.168.0.5 and remote host is remote, then you can ssh -b 192.168.0.5 remote or store a record in ~...


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Ok found the answer. If I place a () in the beginning and end of this it works. (ssh $SERVER "su $ORACLE_USER -c 'export ORACLE_HOME=\"/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0\"; export PATH=\"/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/Opatch:\$PATH\"; opatch lsiinventory'") > /tmp/output.txt


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In most shells, variables aren't automatically part of the environment until they're exported there (in Bourne shell terminology). For sh/bash, use: ssh $SERVER "su $ORACLE_USER -c 'export ORACLE_HOME=\"/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0\"; export PATH=\"/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/Opatch:\$PATH\"; ...


-1

The Plesk team released an extension to help with just that a month after your question. Check out Gitman


3

To execute commands automatically using PuTTY, use the -m switch to pass a text file with the command(s) to run, like: putty.exe -ssh user@host -m commands.txt Where the commands.txt would contain usrun -u root rush But this won't help you with the password as that's an input to the usrun command, not a command on its own, so the -m is useless here. ...


1

The problem is, that you have explicitly specified your key in the ~/.ssh/config and you don't have stored additional (un-encrypted) public key. Therefore the client is trying the keys listed in the configuration file first and the agent-keys later (it can not match them, because the explicit key is encrypted). If my theory is right, it should work for you, ...


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You could try (if you are only going to a single internal site) setting up a TCP proxy that makes a SSL/TLS connection upstream. WinGate will allow you to do this, and also allows you to specify a client certificate to use. Then you would SSH in, and connect to that proxy instead of the internal server (you may need to edit hosts file so you can still ...


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Lets assume you want to connect from you client to the example.com SSH server. It has some public key, which you already have in the ~/.ssh/known_hosts. The easiest way is to simulate that on your client: Generate a new key using ssh-keygen: ssh-keygen -t rsa -f rsa -P "" remove the old known_hosts and replace them with this key (prefix with the ...


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Several options come to my mind. Shell Script you could write a shell script which starts openVPN starts SSH stops openVPN when SSH disconnects #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/openvpn /home/user/ovpn/config.ovpn ssh user@host pkill -SIGTERM -f 'openvpn --conf /home/user/ovpn/config.ovpn' After that, you can alias that, e.g. alias vpnssh='/home/scriptname.sh', ...


3

OpenSSH asks for passphrase for every garbage input. There is open bug for that upstream. It can be very confusing for a lot of users. Only way to check what is behind that is to use openssl directly: openssl rsa -text <mykey.pem It should ask for a passphrase or report any other error in the key.


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When you create a private key, you can choose to protect it with a password. If you are 100% sure nobody (and no virus or anything) will ever copy that key, you can do without. Same if the key is for something that has no value like a local test machine with nothing of importance on it. Otherwise it's good practise to use a password. If the private key is ...


2

It means the key itself was encrypted using a passphrase. To log in with the key, ssh first needs to decrypt it.


1

I would suggest setting up a SOCKS proxy. This is very easily set-up by adding the option -D portnumber to the command you command you gave in your post. Then, you can configure your browser to use a SOCKS proxy with server localhost and portnumber the number your provided in the ssh command. This way, your browser will refer to your own proxy which is on ...


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I see the question is adequately answered, but I would like to add that I see you're connecting to this server via ssh on port 5566. I read once on this site that communicating via SSH on unprivileged ports (being everything above 1024) is unsafe. When you are logged onto a system as a non-root user (anyone not being uid 0), you cannot create a listing ...


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If you wish to filter by process, use findstr while (1) { ps | findstr explorer | sort -desc cpu | select -first 30; sleep -seconds 2; cls }


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I think your ssh-agent isn't working ! Perform the following commands... eval ssh-agent -s ssh-add


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Those are color/positions chars. You have 2 options 1)Ensure you ssh client support same terminal type you have in TERM variable. To get it use env|grep TERM 2) run asterisk console without color -n Disable ANSI colors even on terminals capable of displaying them. So use asterisk -rn


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If your work has a proxy server, set up an SSH tunnel to the corporate proxy server from your client and then tell your local browser to use the proxy on your local machine (which the SSH client will then re-route to the remote proxy). See http://www.revsys.com/writings/quicktips/ssh-tunnel.html If they don't and it's for a small range of sites, modify ...


2

I need to load the key with ssh-agent first. Otherwise it prompts twice for the password. You don't need it. If your key does have passphrase, it is useful. It takes ages (24 seconds) to connect. I should mention here, that I'm on Windows using mobaXterm, in case this is responsible for the 24 seconds. Connecting takes some time. If you want ...


3

Both of the protocols are based on SSH. And SSH itself has some overhead: SCP is really naive protocol with really naive algorithm for transferring a few of small files. It has a lot of synchronization (RTT - Round Trip Time) and small buffers (basically 2048 B -- source). Rsync is made for performance and therefore it gives much better results and have ...


5

RSYNC vs SCP SCP basically does a plain old copy from source to destination locally or across a network using SSH but you may be able to use the -C switch to enable SSH compression to potentially speed up the copy of data across the network. RSYNC transfers just the differences between two sets of files across the network connection, using an efficient ...


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You probably need to create inbound policies. From the amazon documentation: The file system must have a mount target whose network interface has a security group with a rule than enables inbound connections on TCP port 2049 from the instance, either by IP address (CIDR range) or security group. The source of inbound TCP 2049 security group rules on mount ...


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It seems that Dropbox just wouldn't wake. Killing the app and restarting did the trick, eg: kill `pgrep Dropbox` open -a Dropbox


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Become root: sudo su - then: passwd Also, if you want to ssh as root, check your sshd_config for PermitRootLogin. This is a security risk though, so it's better to login as a normal user and use sudo.


0

I found that restarting systemd-logind.service only cured the problem for a few hours. Changing UsePAM from yes to no in sshd_config has resulted in fast logins, although motd is no longer displayed. Comments about security issues?


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Just configure your SSH daemon on Ubuntu to run at TCP:HTTPS port. Then you need to configure Putty to use proxy and connect to the Ubuntu server using HTTPS port, that's all. You can consider using SSH tunneling too, take a look here.


0

Your VM IP address seems a little strange because it ending with 255 like a broadcast address. Are you using a /16 netmask? Can you ping it? Do you have any local console on that VM by the way? Can you try to delete this VM RSA key from your trusted keys list on the local machine? Maybe it was changed and it's the reason why you can't login again.


0

I have found solution. Type the below commands in your shell. export CVS_RSH=ssh export CVS_SERVER=/home/xxx/cvs/src/cvs CVS_SERVER value can be obtained by typing which cvs cmd in your shell) cvs -d :ext:userid@server:CVSROOT_PATH checkout appName Make the necessary changes and then commit the changes using below command cvs -d :ext:userid@server:...


0

So, somehow, forcing a failed boot 3 times, instead of reverting to stock, has reverted me to the working, "failsafe" partition, except I don't believe I'm in failsafe any more. All my settings are still intact (that were previously set while in failsafe mode). I am going to reboot and see what happens - but first, this is what happens if I check what's ...


1

You should be able to configure your local (windows) network card so that you can talk to the router over wired ethernet. Most likely the DHCP server and packet routing services of the router are not operating, but I'm guessing the LAN port is. Configure Static IP Address on Windows 10 PC First, make sure you are physically connected (ethernet cable) ...


3

You can create a custom rule that allows all inbound traffic from a certain subnet. Open Windows Firewall with Advanced Security (wf.msc). Right-click Inbound Rules, then choose Add Rule. On the Rule Type screen, choose Custom. On the Program screen, choose All programs. On the Protocol and Ports screen, leave the default values (any protocol). On the ...


1

Thanks for all your suggestions ,I figured out the way the way to do it and would like to share it for other peoples benefit Step 1: After installing Putty on my windows system I used this command to install the ssh server on ubuntu sudo apt-get install openssh-server Step 2: After the installation I used this command on the command line window of my ...


1

Starting with ssh 7.3 (which is the next upcoming release as I'm writing this), an Include directive is available. Include: Include the specified configuration file(s). Multiple path names may be specified and each pathname may contain glob wildcards and shell-like "~" references to user home directories. Files without absolute paths are assumed to ...


7

This is almost always done with SSH. You need to have a setup where: Windows is an SSH Client. Linux is an SSH Server. Once you connect Windows (as a client) to the Linux server, and login, you'll have a terminal (shell/bash depending on your config), and you can execute any command just as if you are on the Linux machine itself. Windows SSH Client: ...


2

Use PuTTY to connect in SSH to the Linux computer. Docs for command line usage: http://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty/0.67/htmldoc/Chapter3.html#using-cmdline You'll especially want to look for the -m option.


0

Ok, I've just manually added the ips of my machines on the ListenAddress lines of /etc/ssh/sshd_config. Pros: I can finally ssh. Cons: That's probably a terrible unscalable hack; if ever I need to ssh into my machines form outside the LAN, I'll probably run into real trouble.


1

I've found the easiest way to resolve ssh connection issues is to use the debug mode of both the client and server applications. On one machine, we'll call it pcA, open a terminal and run the following command: /usr/sbin/sshd -d -p 2222 On the other linux machine, pcB, enter this command and watch the server output on pcA: ssh -vv -p 2222 [IP Address of ...


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Take a look at the project Bashhub. It's effectively exactly what you are asking for - a dropbox for bash history - but they have added tools to reference the history from all your machines, assuming they have access to the internet. There are valid concerns about sending your shell interactions to a third party (e.g. employer, privacy, working on sensitive ...



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