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21

A DCHP reservation. Cisco refers to it as "Static DHCP". More information here. (CTRL-F for "static allocation").


19

On the router I set a static IP 192.168.1.20 to Mac Addresse XYN:123 No you didn't, you created a DHCP reservation - these are different, though the outcome is the same. You will have an IP conflict that will result in degraded connectivity for one or both computers. Your colleague is roughly correct, though I have no idea what he means by "stealing ...


15

DHCP static leases are much better. They're easily managed, many consumer grade and SOHO routers have the ability to do so, and it enables everything to be done under one single management tool.


15

Your router can indeed lease that IP address to another client once the lease expires if your machine is off or disconnected, and doesn't renew it. To guarantee you always get the same IP address, you'll want to make what's called a DHCP Reservation in your router (terminology may vary - see this question for details): With DD-WRT firmware, you can find ...


14

in /etc/rc.conf: ifconfig_em0="inet 192.168.0.254 netmask 255.255.255.0" defaultrouter="192.168.0.1" 192.168.0.254 -- the machine IP, 192.168.0.1 -- gateway These settings in rc.conf are looked up in the boot process. If you'd like to set ip manually, run: ifconfig em0 inet 192.168.0.254 netmask 255.255.255.0 route delete default; route add default ...


13

Answers first Will all these computers have the same external IP address, or will it somehow be different for each one? And does it matter? These computers, behind the router, will appear as just one computer from the outside (at least they will use the same IP address; websites are still able to distinguish them by using browser cookies and some ...


13

On the router I set a static IP 192.168.1.20 to Mac Addresse XYN:123 Now a new device XXX:999, sets in its network card to always use addresse 192.168.1.20 I'm not sure about this naming schematic as it looks like more of a hostname:port combo than a mac address. Let's pretend that: on the DHCP Server you set a static reservation for xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ...


12

If your router doesn't allow reservations (see John T's answer) then you should at least be able to change the DHCP pool, making it smaller and then use the IPs which fall outside of the pool for your statics.


11

Change the virtualbox network settings to Host-only networking and edit the following file in the virtual machine: /etc/network/interfaces You can that change it to have a static IP like this: iface eth0 inet static address 192.168.2.10 netmask 255.255.255.0 network 192.168.2.0 broadcast 192.168.2.255 gateway ...


10

You're talking about a DHCP reservation. This is actually a common feature but little-known by most folks. It's quite useful for locking an IP address to a machine, but wanting to keep centralized control over its settings for DNS and default gateway, etc. Very useful.


10

Only your ISP can give you a fixed IP address. You could look to using a VPN to a device on a fixed IP address (for instance a virtual server you managed yourself), but that's about your only other option. Alternatively you could talk to the admin of the server and see if they can set it up so that you can use a VPN to access the server.


7

The modem is operating in bridge mode. When you are plugged modem directly with the laptop, it is the laptop MAC address that they see, and that is the MAC address they statically assign the address to. When you plug in the router, they see a different mac address, and assign a dynamic address to it as it isn't the one they have configured. All you need ...


6

If like me, you happen to be on a Redhat based system like CentOS, just edit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1 with the following: DEVICE=eth1 BOOTPROTO=static IPADDR=192.168.56.101 NETMASK=255.255.255.0 Obviously, I've assigned the static IP to eth1 but you need to change it according to what ifconfig tell you.


6

Dynamic DNS (DDNS) is what you need if you don't want to pay for a static IP, but as Arjan pointed out DDNS only works for inbound traffic. As I see it you have three options: Pay Time Warner for a static IP address. Set up a proxy server that will send its IP address (which will be static) instead of your IP address. Use third party firmware on a ...


6

From what I have found, it doesn't look like the WRT54G2 supports setting static IPs through the DHCP server. Depending on the version of the WRT54G2 you could load a 3rd party firmware such as DD-WRT onto the router to add these features. Here is a tutorial from someone who did it on a WRT54G2.


6

Check out MarcoPolo, you can configure just about anything depending on your location, including network settings.


6

Using DHCP reservations offers you a sort of poor-man's IP address management solution. You can see and change IP addresses from a single console and makes it so you can see what addresses are available without having to resort to an Excel spreadsheet (or worse, a ping and pray system). That being said, many applications require a static IP. If the server ...


6

You can configure both the OSes to ask for static IPs instead of the router assigning static IP addresses based on their MAC addresses. This can be achieved by configuring the respective operating systems' network settings, and have both of them ask for different static IPs. In Windows, these settings can be found in Network and Sharing Center. In Linux ...


5

My router calls it IP-MAC binding Also heard it refered to as DCHP reservation


5

Asking the ISP or network administrator or physically checking the settings is the easiest way because: If you are talking about the address provided by your ISP, then switching your router off for a while will eventually force the ISP to release your old IP. Unfortunately, you could be unlucky and your "new" IP may be exactly the same as your old one. This ...


5

The destination will see traffic coming from a Tor exit node and not your static IP. A list of Tor exit nodes is publicly available and therefore server operators can choose to block it, but it's fruitless to try to trace it back to origin. If you meant if someone from your network or workplace could detect what sites you are visiting, if you are not also ...


5

Scan your local network with nmap.


5

Ask if your work can deal with a "static" URL. If so, then sign up with for a No-IP.com or Dyndns.com account. These services provide a "dynamic update client" that you can use to notify the service of your current IP. The service controls the URL, but will update its resolved address to whichever one that your dynamic update client gives it.


5

Everything in your question is completely wrong. My goal is to be able to ssh into any machine behind home-net without resorting to ugly port-forwarding and port mappings. The only way around this is to have multiple public IP addresses. If you only have a single IP as is typical for residential ISP connections, you must resort to port forwarding. ...


4

If I'm understanding your proposed solution correctly, the answer is no, this will not work unless you port forward ssh. Even if you got the home-net IPs, they would be unroutable from the external client's perspective, because they are not publicly routable addresses. Your client could format a packet with a home-net IP as the destination, but the first ...


4

I think a dynamic IP is not more secure than a fixed one because probably nobody will try to find you specifically but any IP that answers. This can be your fixed IP or your Dynamic IP (if you open the ports and have servers behind them like ssh). The unique difference is that your machine will always answer on the same IP so the attacker theoretically has ...


4

The dd-wrt.com wiki has a page Obtaining Router IP. It says to use the arp command. From that page: If you still receive no response, the IP address may have been changed from the default. Disconnect all other machines from the router and run arp in a command window to find out what the IP address is: arp -a You should receive a response from the ...


4

XP has an 'alternate configuration' option in the TCP/IP properties section. You could set it to use DHCP for the home network (or actually, just about any network with an active DHCP server). When that fails it will fall back to the alternate configuration, which you configure with the static IP. (From the LAN, use right click, properties, select ...


4

There are two possibilities I know of: Prevent DHCP from assigning a subset of IP addresses in your subnet, and use those for machines that need static addresses. Configure your DHCP server to assign static addresses for particular computers. Both options require configuration of your DHCP server, but standard home network routers often only allow the ...



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