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Type “Manage advanced sharing settings” in the Start Menu Go to “Home and Work” Under “Media Streaming” you click the “Choose media streaming options” link Click the “Block all” button followed by the “OK” button http://pario.no/2012/01/26/disable-dlna-in-windows-7/


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From network point-of-view "downloading" and "streaming" are different services, it is called "traffic profile" For streaming service the network has to provide a minimum constant throughput (technically "bandwidth" means something different), the streaming service is sensitive for interruptions and jitter. It does not require the maximum network ...


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Streaming does use your download throughput hence you can consider it as download. Your question is a little bit ambiguous as to what you consider a download. You can only download as much upload they can and are willing to offer. So in the end if you want to compare a straight download from HTTP over DASH (still HTTP) for example, you'd have to check how ...


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Streaming is really a way of downloading. When you watch a streamed movie, your media player will download parts of it, show them to you, and discard the shown parts of the file on the fly. Typically, when you download a file, you wait for the download to finish, and only then start watching it. But there are media players that are capable of showing you ...


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If you're really asking for "bandwidth" (bytes/sec) and not "total data" (bytes), the crucial question is: during what period of time? If we're assuming that the user watches the entire video and that the same codec/quality etc. is returned, and ignore the small overhead of streaming request/responses, then the total data returned is equal. Now, what is the ...


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Streaming will use less bandwidth, especially if network conditions are bad, but this comes at a price. At issue is the data that needs to be sent. In a download model, all of the data must reach the customer, all in the right order, no matter what. If network conditions are bad and some bits of the data don't reach the client, they must be resent, and this ...


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To add to other answers, my answer is: Not necessarily. Now, assuming that everything is equal (no automatic quality selection, no throttling from server and/or ISP)... Bandwidth is usually defined as size_of_data divided by total_time. (Technically, the 'proper' term is throughput, but I digress). Let's assume you're going to stream a 2000-second video ...


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The answer is "It depends". The answer is NO, for providers that host video in general. Half decent providers that stream video do rate control so as to ensure smooth playback and optimal bandwidth for as many people as possible. So even though you may have lots of bandwidth, it may decide to give you only 5Mbit and look still quite decent. If you do an ...


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They are not comparable. For the first instance, the optimal encoding for local viewing is different than the optima encoding for streamed viewing. Let's talk about video encoding. In most video encoding format, there are usually two types of frames: Intra-coded frame (I-Frame) - these are frames that is transferred in full, this frame can be decoded ...


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Assuming we are talking about the same quality (i.e. no throttling, frame-skipping, or lower-quality streams), then at best the streams will take the same amount of bandwidth as a download, although it could be done at a time/rate more convenient to the provider. It could also take more bandwidth depending on how the video is compressed - most of the time ...


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It is often not equivalent. Streaming providers use protocols, such as DASH, to dynamically adjust the quality of the movie to the users bandwidth availability and quality desires. Then the servers may rate-limit your connection so that you can buffer a certain amount (something like 10 seconds, maybe 30 or a whole minute) and afterwards you only get the ...


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Yes it is the equivalent. Download= You download it only one time and it stays on your computer. Stream= You temporarily download "something" to your computer.


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Do you mean remote desktop? VNC would be most popular protocol for linux. But take a look for Spice, too. For Windows, MS provides "Remote Desktop Protocol" or RDP.


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After finding the URL behind a video stream, it has to be added to VLC (as specified in the other answer): Open Network Stream menu item (or Ctrl+N). To find that URL, here is the link to an older question. The selected answer there is by no means the best. The most voted one is good because it involves just using the Chrome browser. But it does not work ...


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As seen from the many answers there must be many ways to do this, but maybe one of the easiest (especially for Firefox users) is the DownloadHelper addon, which has also the advantage of being available on all OSes. Install the Firefox addon DownloadHelper, run the flash stream in Firefox, the DownloadHelper button should start rolling, click the ...



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