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1

We can do this easy in binary. Lets just look at the 4th quartet (I really hate that name). Bits 49-64 of the address, since writing all 128 bits is painful. I am going to use () to group each nibble and a to represent the subnet boundary. a000 = (1010) (0000)(0000)(0000) So we want to break that into 4 subnets, and so we need 4 bits. a000 = (1010)(00 ...


1

There are 2 main things to understand here: "Segments" must be isolated from each other. Even though /22 can support 1022 hosts (2^10-2), you can't put the 600 hosts of segment A and the 300 hosts of segment B into the same network. If you did segment A hosts could "see" segment B hosts and that's not desired, thus the reason for different segments to ...


2

Segment B can't overlap Segment A. Segment A takes up 131.107.168.0-131.107.171.255, so the next starting address that is unallocated is 131.107.172.0


0

Yes it’s possible. But there’s still the switch—unless you make yourself a Man in the Middle (e.g. with ARP Poisoning), your network interface will only get packets matching its MAC address. The old hub days, when everyone received every packet, are long gone. Your scenario, however, only applies to home networks. In a data center (well, basically any ...


0

There's a couple of different reasons why this could be: The computer you are trying to ping doesn't respond to ping. If you are using a host-name, the target's host-name won't be in DNS. The router serving your target subnet isn't routing pings. There is a firewall blocking ICMP (ping protocol) traffic. You will always have a (at least one) "router in ...


-1

Presuming you are using the correct terminology of subnet then this is because of NAT, it appears as though your network administrators have set the networks NAT to be able to communicate with the internet however not other subnet's within the LAN, quite common as to do so would mean an extra NAT rule. Otherwise it may be the case of your friends computer's ...


-1

Most of todays computers, that are connected to the Internet, are protected by a firewall. In many instances, this firewall is configured to "drop" (i.e. ignore) incoming pings (echo-request messages of the ICMP protocol). This ofcourse stops the target of your ping from answering. In addition to that, some network administrators even go as far as ...



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