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That is a Unicode Byte Order Mark or BOM. It is typically found in files written on a Microsoft platform using UTF-8 or UTF-16 LE encoding (which Microsoft unhelpfully describe as "Unicode") You can normalise your files to a common encoding using tools like iconv or recode. Life is likely to be a lot easier if you standardise on UTF-8 with no BOM for ...


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Go to the terminal and navigate to the svn repsitory: now type svn update -r "revision number you want to revert"


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Often SVN servers will automatically use a text context type when serving up .c/.h files, so I'm surprised this isn't already happening for you. You can try setting the svn:mime-type property on these files to "text/plain", or verifying that a different mime type is not already set on those files. SVN servers use this property to determine the http content ...


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This question is basically the same as "what filesystem do I format an external drive to so that it is accessible on both Windows and Linux?" And the answer to that is FAT32 as seen here.


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If the new server contains the stuff you want to use completely, meaning that there isn't anything in the old working directory that you need to commit, the best method is to rename the old top level directory to something like website-old, and then do a fresh virgin checkout of the new svn repo. It is possible to change where your checkout points to if you ...


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In NetBeans 8.0.2 : Disconnect the repository (Menu: Team->Disconnect) Clear repository url history (Menu: Tools->Options->Team->Subversion->Manage Connections Settings) Reconnect with new url (Menu: Team->Connect)



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