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35

Natively You can do this natively in Notepad++, but in order to replicate the behaviour of Firefox, you need to disable the document switcher and MRU behaviour. Disable MRU functionality Navigate to Settings > Preferences... > MISC.. Where it says Document Switcher (Ctrl+TAB) uncheck the first check box Enable. Hit the Close button. Create the ...


28

An Ethernet splitter takes advantage of the fact that 10MBit and 100Mbit Ethernet only use 4 wires, even though the cable (almost certainly) contains 8 wires. The splitter consists of two pieces (see picture): one is connected to each end of the existing cable, providing the appearance of two ports at each end. Each link has 4 dedicated wires, so there is no ...


22

Yes, the router will only allow the machines connected to it to function at 100 Mbps. So, no, they will not be able to communicate at gigabit speeds when connected only to the router. However, since you have a gigabit switch. Connect all the machines to the switch and then run the switch uplink to the router. The port used as the uplink will connect to the ...


18

A hub is the simplest hardware device that is used to interconnect equipments. It provides network ports from which he reads packets and duplicates them to all other ports. The switch (layer II) is an enhanced hub. The simplest switch can decide on which port to send a received packet so as to not disturb a sub-network where no one is interested with this ...


16

If with 'transfer speed' you mean throughput: It should not matter much. Every extra device will introduce some minor latency (after all some processing is needed, if if it is only very minor). However latency is not the same as throughput. Compare it with a conversation via a satellite phone. There will be a 3 second lag before someone else can comment on ...


15

What you are looking for is NOT a fiber channel switch. You are looking for an ethernet switch with SFP slots, unless you want an antique (GPIB slot). While you can purchase SFP switches with no copper slots, it's often not the best or most affordable solution. Then you need SFPs (Small Form Pluggables) which are the devices that actually connect to LC fiber ...


14

If you're used to Ubuntu, then use Ubuntu. Also, any distribution that's modern and up-to-date are pretty standard in what they offer. The big thing that sets them apart however, are the package managers. Red Hat based distros use RPM packages and Yum-based repositories, and Debian/Ubuntu based distros use deb packages and apt. Personally, I prefer Debian ...


14

Switches are layer 2 devices, and neither know nor care about what's going on with IP (V4 or V6) and TCP at layers 3 and 4. They just move Ethernet packets around.


13

They are still different things. They work at different levels of the network. Simplifying things a bit: Routers work at Level 3 - the network layer - e.g. routing traffic based on IP address Switches work at Level 2 - the data link layer, connecting network segments - e.g routing data based on MAC address. Hubs - connect ethernet devices together to ...


13

Create a shortcut to Chrome, in the Properties window add -incognito to the Target box. (image from here)


13

In short, no. The switch should keep track of which MAC addresses can be reached on which ports, and it then only sends packets out through the correct ports. There is a limit to how many MAC addresses a switch can remember, though it's usually not an issue unless you're operating extremely large networks. Furthermore, most consumer routers are actually a ...


13

No, not entirely (or none I've ever seen), but you can get managed and smart switches to perform Port Mirroring, which will give you all the traffic on the switch on one port. Some folk believe that you can force certain types of switches to send out all the frames they receive on all ports, using an MAC or ARP flood attack, but I've no experience with that ...


12

When you connect two switches together, you are extending your broadcast domain. The broadcast domain can impose a burden in fairly large networks. When you connect each switch independently to the router, there will be a broadcast domain for each switch, thus controlling the broadcast traffic passing through your network.


12

Amongst other things (like what haroldmoma mentioned), another to consider is that if you chain the switches together and the first one dies, the second one will also stop working (everyone is offline). If you attach them both to the router, then one failing won't affect the other (only half the office is offline).


12

With just two devices, a hub is sufficient. When you have just two machines to connect, why the network device? go point-to-point. I am guessing you want to connect more devices later. Collisions will matter at that time then (and you cannot go PtP then either). These days switches and hubs do not have a lot of cost differential. You might in fact get a ...


11

Yes. In fact, I have a gigabit switch connected to my 100 router. All the gigabit computers are connected to the switch. When two of those computers want to talk to each other, they bypass the router and talk at gigabit speeds (sadly, well short of theoretical, but much faster than 100). And of course they talk to the rest of the LAN and the internet just ...


10

The GB devices will communicate through the switch at GB speed but any traffic transiting the router will be limited to 10/100.


10

Looking at the official specifications for the D-Link device and comparing them with the NETGEAR device, I would go with the D-LINK. D-LINK presents the same relevant specifications, even more than NETGEAR. Also it's cheaper :) Concerning the latency issue, the D-LINK provides you with a QoS method for controlling traffic priority, allowing you to ...


9

The following is drawn from this site, the last paragraph is the relevant bit. Network cables, such as Cat 5e and Cat 6, comprise eight wires arranged as four twisted pairs. In 10 and 100BASE-T Ethernet, two of these pairs are used for sending information, and these are known as the data pairs. The other two pairs are unused and are referred to ...


9

Gigabit or 100Mbit (or 10Mbit) will be decided on a link by link basis, and it is possible to mix the two within a network. Each router/switch should automatically negotiate the fastest link speed (although sometimes it's better to specify this manually, if possible). So, it makes sense to group all 100Mbit hardware with your existing 100Mbit switch; ...


9

I think with just two devices, a cable is sufficient. If none of the devices has Auto-MDIX you'll need a crossover cable.


9

This may not directly answer your question, but I find these useful: You can drag and drop the folder icon next to the folder name in the Finder. You can drop it in an Open/Save dialog Command-click the icon in the Finder window to get a list of all the folders "up" the tree Enable the Path Bar (in the view menu) And you might find this a good page ...


8

FileUtils is a contextual (right-click) finder plugin that, among other things, allows one to copy the path of items to the clipboard. Then you can press command-shift-G to have a "Go to folder" dialog appear where you can paste. This shortcut works in any standard open/save dialog on the Mac. You can also drag a folder to the open/save dialogs (so the ...


8

Well for example most Samsung Monitors with HDMI and VGA connectors have a source button where you can switch between the two signals. Using both is no problem at all. For using only one keyboard and mouse you might want to install Synergy on both PCs which lets you share that hardware via the network. Alternatively you can try a VNC solution. The drawback ...


8

As a Linux aficionado I can only say: Give it a try, you will see what specific advantages and disadvantages it has for you. That said: You don't primarily use an operating system, what you use is your applications. You can make a list with the applications you use most often and then decide which operating system fits your needs.


8

I use an old hub for network troubleshooting as well. They're hard to come by these days. There appear to be a few on Amazon and you may find some on ebay as well. Make sure to read the tech specs carefully to make sure you're actually getting a hub, as opposed to a switch. ...


7

Why not start with the management guide? http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps606/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a008007d10e.html It should cover everything you need. But to get you started. You need a direct console connection (com port connection), configure your terminal emulation program for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, ...


7

While Wireless-N is theoretically faster, you'll be very hard pressed to get anything like the maximum speed, especially with multiple machines trying to get it at the same time. In real terms, unless both of your machines are right next to the router, you'll be getting better speeds with wires. It's also worth considering that you'll get lower ping times, ...


7

OK, I went to the folder where all system sounds were stored, and moved the entire folder elsewhere, so if it does change system sound schemes, it won't have a source to play the sounds... The other option is Sound Sentry...In the accessibility control panel, you can choose to have all sound disabled and, optionally enable visual cues instead. From ...



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