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I doubt that the different schemes would make a lot of difference to be honest since the compression algorithms typically only look forward a limited amount in order to control memory use. The exception is S3 which would end up larger most likely since compressing a compressed file adds overheads but cannot compress. If you want better compression, look ...


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With creative uses of wildcards. $ tree MyFiles MyFiles ├── dira │   ├── file1 │   ├── file2 │   └── file3 ├── dirb │   ├── file1 │   ├── file2 │   └── file3 ├── dirc │   ├── file1 │   ├── file2 │   └── file3 ├── file1 ├── file2 └── file3 What we need to do is just not tell zip about the root files. Bash wildcards allow us to specify this with zip -r ...


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Easy. Just use --strip-components=1 on the archive like this: tar -xf archive.tar --strip-components=1 And as explained in the official tar man page: --strip-components=NUMBER strip NUMBER leading components from file names on extraction With the logic being that if a path consists of foo/something.txt then the first “component” of that path ...


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They are all technically correct, just different MIME types, although, most are depreciated. The correct MIME type is application/x-gzip according to cPanel standards.


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The -C option only applies when you create an archive, not when you restore it. Your only option is to cd into the directory to restore into first, like this: ( cd /tmp && tar -xvf /<pathToMyFile.tar>/MyFile.tar )



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