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39

What you need is an FXO card for your PC. This is a PCI card with a phone socket in it, and it effectively works as a PSTN (public switched telephone network) phone on a card. You plug this into your wall socket just as you would a telephone. Then you use PBX software (such as Asterisk) to mediate the calls. You would need a way to interact with the PBX, ...


12

The simple answer is no, you cannot make a typical computer into a PSTN-connected PBX without a new piece of hardware: an "FXO card". An analog modem cannot perform as a voice-service FXO as they are designed only to process data bits asynchronously (i.e., V.92 protocol) – that's why modems are much cheaper and more common than FXO cards. A LAN card's port ...


7

Spare Cat-5/5e/6? Sure. If you need RJ11 instead of RJ45, you'd need to snip off any existing RJ45 connection and replace it with an RJ11. For a single phone line, you only need 1 pair (2 wires) out of the existing 4 (but use a matched pair). For a 4-conductor/2-line RJ11, use 2 pair. For a full 6-conductor/3-line RJ11, use 3 pair. Here's a wiring ...


5

The second link that slhck posted hits it right on the head. The keyboard number pad has the layout it does because that's the same way a calculator is laid-out. The idea was that accountants and others who frequently-used calculators would find it easier to use the number pad, as opposed to the numbers off of the top row. As a developer, I always hit ...


4

Hmm... I thought that I posted an answer earlier but maybe I didn't. Anyhoo, CAT3 cable will support 10mbps Ethernet (10BASE-T) but not FastEthernet (100BASE-TX) so it should be possible to use it for Ethernet if there are enough pairs and if the connectors are terminated correctly. It doesn't matter which wires you use as long as you use the same colors on ...


4

Actually Skype themselves have now come up with a multi-user (up to 9) video conf. Tested it last week and it looks fine. At this writing it's in Beta, with a "free trial", though I can't see how they can charge for it while it's still in Beta...


3

http://tinychat.com/ It's a web app so no software to install. It includes a chatroom feature and offers you option to record the conference. I find it pretty cool.


3

We've used WebEx at work with good results in the past. Supports both video conferencing as well as desktop sharing between clients. People can even dial in to a conference over the phone if they don't have a microphone. Since you've said this is work-related, the cost at $49/month may not be too bad.


3

Maybe this, not free http://www.sound-snooper.com/en/features.php . Audacity says it does sound activated recording, its free http://audacity.sourceforge.net/


3

Linux command line: linphone includes a scriptable linphonec command-line version. Starting linphonec with the --pipe option will create a socket in /tmp that one can write to and read from. It fulfills all your requirements and I've tested (for my own uses) all of them successfully: Calling via SIP, transmitting DTMF sequences, recording a call to file, ...


3

Yes, there is, a PCI fax modem. or for laptops, a USB fax modem Then any good old "Caller ID" software will do what you're looking for.


2

VOIP is a specific component of "internet telephony". VOIP is typically considered internet telephony between two non-analog lines. Internet telephony without VOIP aims to create a cross-over between analog (PSTN) phone lines and an IP based client.


2

A facsimile machine, much like a computer modem, is designed to work at voice frequencies. Given that the ADSL filter works with voice frequencies on a normal telephone, it will work fine with a fax machine as well.


2

I suspect you have a setup similar to this one: A strong signal enters the house at the ISRA point. If you split the line you get two weaker signals. Traditionally the line is split and two filters are applied. One to block anything but the sounds/frequencies needed for an analog telephone. And one with a different frequency range for DSL. That that I ...


2

Currently they only support Tollfree calls to these regions: France: +33 800, +33 805, +33 809 Poland: +48 800 UK: +44 500, +44 800, +44 808 USA: +1 800, +1 866, +1 877, +1 888 Taiwan: +886 80 How do I dial toll free numbers (for example, +1 800, +1 866 and +1 877 number series)?


2

Yes, it is possible. For this you need a software that works as a PBX (e.g. asterix) and a FXP card or device (e. g. Cisco/Linksys/Sipura SPA3102).


2

No. Phone wire is Cat3, it's quality is much too low to support modern Ethernet (which requires Cat5 or higher). HPNA adapters can use phone lines to tranmit 802.3 frames; but WiFi would be much cheaper.


2

I don't think you actually need a "router" for this. There are devices called "ATA" (Analog Telephone Adapter). Technically- they enable every "regular" analog phone to be used with VOIP services. For example, Vonage uses "Phone Adapter"s, which you can use with your home router. VOIP routers are just Routers with embedded ATAs. Just make sure that the ...


2

No additional hardware is no problem if your computer (modern notebook?) has a microphone and speaker. However, to reduce or avoid crosstalk, an earphone plugged into the audio out connector would help. There is plenty of software that can connect your microphone and speaker to asterisk, e.g.: Ekiga, Linphone. You don't like VoIP, but you call over voip ...


2

IIRC, the originating FAX is supposed to emit it's carrier tone as soon as the connection is made (whereas an originating data modem waits for the answering side to emit a carrier tone first). So an answering device can listen very briefly to the line and determine if it's FAX or voice.


1

not a conclusive answer, but i think you should be fine. ADSL works at the higher frequencies (which is what the filter filters and splits out) and fax works on the normal voice-frequencies (which is why you can hear it if you accidentally ring a fax machine with a normal phone) so i'd be very suprised if it didnt work


1

Where this is an older question... newer advancements have been made in this arena. Google Plus now offers "Hangouts" where you can invite a group of people to a video-conference enabled chat session and interact freely over the web. It's free... and it works quite well.


1

The AVM Fritz Box fulfils most of your requirements. It is very popular in Germany but quality is closer to Linksys than Cicso.


1

Some tools for voice modem software are: Ring Central BVRP Messaging Software For Linux: VOCP


1

Agreed -- PBXes come standard with all the features you might want. In addition, they are totally programmable, so they can support the most complex implementations. You'll pay a premium for this flexibility, but in many cases the price difference between PBX systems and less adaptable solutions will be smaller than you might expect. They are just one of ...


1

Take a look at this guide: http://www.fredshack.com/docs/asterisk.html Basically, you'll need some software (Asterisk is very popular) and a PSTN gateway to connect to the standard telephone system.


1

I think you can start with Asterisk as the PBX software and FreePBX to configure Asterisk using a web interface. You'll also need a VOIP provider who will give you the ability to place VOIP calls (and receive). If you want, you can also plug in your PSTN line to receive/place calls using your normal number (but these won't be VOIP calls). For this you'll ...


1

I'd bet the user manual for Asterisk would be a good source, and might also point you to more generic resources.


1

This may be possible but I doubt it. Asterisk only supports specialist cards and the majority of 56k voice modems don't work. Most 3G USB sticks simply emulate a 56k modem, and, I highly doubt they would have emulated any advanced features to make sure asterisk works. I have personally never seen a 3g stick supporting voice, I am not entirely sure how ...



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