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3

You probably have a .png file in your current directory and the * is expanded by your shell. Here's a practical explanation. Create a directory called test, then another one called sub inside it and finally a file called myfile.txt in sub. Then cd into test. Here are commands to do that: ~ >mkdir -p test/sub ~ >touch test/sub/myfile.txt ~ >cd test ...


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This function should looks like: callSINGULAR() { /opt/local/bin/Singular -b "$1" } Because the parameter is first, provided to function


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Instead of -x "Icon" use -x "*Icon*"


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Are you looking for the .../folder/subfolder/ folder itself, all files in it, or some specific file in it? For the folder itself: find / -path "*/folder/subfolder" -type d For all files in it: find / -path "*/folder/subfolder/*" For a specific file directly in the folder: find / -path "*/folder/subfolder/filename" For a specific file somewhere under ...


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You have different possiblities: If your program is already running Press CTRL+Z to suspend your program. It will not be running now. To resume the program in the background, type bg and press ENTER. If you want to start a new program in the background directly Simply add & to your program before you start it: $ geany "do_while.cpp" & You might ...


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Short answer: M-x terminal-emulator sounds exactly like what you're asking for. What you need might be different - if you really just need to give the program a series of y lines on stdin, consider yes | program. If the program really wants its stdin to be a tty, consider using expect.


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Borrowed from Stackoverflow: ls -1 | sed -e 's/\..*$//' I tried flagging as duplicate but didn't work. One of my own solutions given we know the file extension(s). find -type f -exec basename -s '.jpg' "{}" \; So find all files as opposed to directories - type f and then execute basename for each. The -s allows you to specify a known suffix to ...


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I was looking for the same and shortly after reading this question I found the solution for my setup (Debian 8, Gnome-Flashback): The relevant key is in org.gnome.desktop.wm.preferences, "button-layout". Edited with dconf-editor from "appmenu:close" to "appmenu:minimize,maximize,close" and the buttons are back :-) Regards, Joachim


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Thanks to @rickfillion: ssh -t me@server.com "cd sub/folders/; bash -l"



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