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Why not just open your text editor of choice and click on File - Open. At the file dialog, hit Command + G and type ~/.bash_profile. Comment out or delete the caustic entry, save your file and re-launch Terminal.


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No, you can not do this the way you described your setup as Windows has no ssh server component which would listen on port 22. You could open a remote powershell connection from one computer to the other but this also would not show on the computer you are connected to A kind of solution where you could connect to another computer and see the same screen on ...


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No, you cannot make this work automatically, i.e., without filtering the output from your program to interpret tab at the right-margin as wrapping. That is because VT100-style wrapping gets up to the right-margin, and will not wrap unless you write a printable character. Tabs are not printable. Most terminals are setup to use soft tabs (already expanded ...


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You can also set an idle timeout interval from SSH server side: File: /etc/ssh/ssh_config Content: ClientAliveInterval XX ClientAliveCountMax YY This works in the exact same way as the client setting, but null packets are sent from from the server, rather than the client. Extracted from: ...


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I just came across this as I'm doing my LPIC and using a MB Pro running CentOS in a VM. Ended up being CTRL+\


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Set up your Terminal tabs with the correct directories. Choose Window → Save Windows as Group…. Give the group a name and select Use window group when Terminal starts. You can open a window group from Window → Open Window Group → named group, or by restarting Terminal if you selected that option in the previous step. For more information about Terminal ...


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The tabs program uses data from the terminal database, to tell the terminal what tab-stops to use. The computer does not know about the tab-stops: using stty you can set the terminal driver to use hard-tabs or soft (the usual expansion of 8 columns per tab stop). Whether you set hard/soft tabs, most applications on the system will assume 8, anyway. The ...


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Make another admin account on your mac, and use it's terminal to delete or mv your broken .bash_profile file. Or boot in single user mode and do it from there (after mount -uw / of course).


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Open terminal preferences, and in the general tab set "shells open with" to /bin/csh. You should now be able to open a new terminal window, rm ~/.bash_profile, and switch back to bash.



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