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If you have dialog then you can do this: find . | grep -i "$1" | sed -e '/$/G' | xargs -d'\n' dialog --menu "text" 0 0 0 3>&1 1>&2 2>&3 | xargs vi You could do something similar with zenity if you only have that and X output.


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Basically the idea is to create a function that can take arguments.. see here here are the functions: function fr { find . | grep -in "$1"; } function vifr { vi "`find . | head -$1 | tail -1`"; } a sample usage is: $ fr nsstring+util 9675:./Build/Intermediates/SmartTaxi.build/Debug-iphonesimulator/SmartTaxi.build/Objects-normal/i386/NSString+Util.d ...


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Without leaving the keyboard, you can select specific lines with sed, and wrap the previous command within $(...), like this: vi "$(fr nsstring+util | sed -ne 3p)" To select the last line, you can use $ instead of a concrete number, but then you have to quote the sed command: vi "$(fr nsstring+util | sed -ne '$p')" For a more general purpose, you can ...


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Yes, your multiple terminals is the reason. The bash history is written when you exit the shell, not individually for each command. You can get your history file in chronological order with sort: history | sort -k2 If your want your history file to be written more continoulsy, I believe this blog post explains it quite well I also found this unix stack ...


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Looks like you can just download the zip for "Snow Leopard and Above 64bit", unzip the file once it's finished downloading (by double clicking it or using the commandline tool unzip), and then you have the binaries. Then you just have to decide where to put the binaries. Since you don't want an admin password, it's probably best to keep them in your home ...


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http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9953005/should-the-bashrc-in-the-home-directory-load-automatically/9954208#9954208 See here. It's OK to add source ~/.bashrc to ~/.profile.


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Yes you can, but the location of the .log file containing the information in question depends on the application. Most log files are in /var/log (you need to be su to access the directory). Some applications allow you to re-define the location of the log file, which in this case is typically to be found in /etc/applicationname. If you cannot find ...


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Linux: No, AFAIK apps not started from a terminal will not necessarily have their STDOUT and STDERR directed anywhere useful. Not all apps write debugging/logging to STDOUT or STDERR. You should read the documentation or man pages for each application to see what logging options are available for each app. Many applications log to the syslog service. the ...


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You should use an Applescript like this: tell application "Terminal" do script "/path/to/my/script" do script "/path/to/my/script-2" ... do script "/path/to/my/script-n" activate end tell This will open a new Terminal window per script.


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That's caused by the ignorespace value in $HISTCONTROL. From man bash: HISTCONTROL A colon-separated list of values controlling how commands are saved on the history list. If the list of values includes ignorespace, lines which begin with a space character are not saved in the history list. It could be caused by the HISTIGNORE ...


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The following command (xterm -e "/path/to/my/script; bash" &); (xterm -e "/path/to/my/other/script; bash") & opens two xterms' which execute the two scripts (provided they have been made executable, of course), and then wait for further instructions. You can easily build an alias to it, or put it into a script accepting the two paths of the two ...


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This had been fixed in version 0.2.13 of the g..amn ev package. Try sudo pecl install ev again.


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1- Install the following packages: sudo apt-get install libfribidi0 libfribidi-dev 2- Download & install THIS package. 3- Open /usr/share/applications/gnome-terminal.desktop by any editor you like: gksudo gedit /usr/share/applications/gnome-terminal.desktop 4- Add the following line to the end of file: Terminal=true Exec=/usr/bin/bicon.bin ...


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I managed to overcome this problem using below command >cd myfolder >zip -r name.zip .


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This is normal. Bundles are not intended to run as standalone executables, but to be loaded as plug-ins into some other program (in this case Waves). It's generally not possible to run them on their own.


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wget -c also continues partial files caused when the download has issues..... Better yet, wget -c -N seems to do both at the same time.


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Change your TERM variable. For instance, if I do ~$ export TERM=xterm Then the behaviour is nicely wrap, like before your update With ~$ export TERM=linux The behaviour is the one after your update This post on askubuntu may help you if you have a colored PS1.


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The short answer is: You can't know! The a bit longer answer is: The OS (any end user OS actually) schedules the processes itself and assigns it to CPUs. Even when running only the simulation the processes might get interrupted and a very short time later continued on the same or another CPU. There is most probably an even longer answer (including code to ...


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First guess: Your configured DNS servers are very slow, and you haven't installed any local DNS cache that would work system-wide. Meanwhile, some web browsers (at least Firefox and Chromium) have internal DNS caching, so they don't send queries often. Chromium sometimes even tries to do DNS lookups before you even click the link, so you never notice the ...


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While I think @neatonk's answer is best and covers all the bases, to specifically disable the scroll bar you can put the following in your ~/.emacs (if (fboundp 'scroll-bar-mode) (scroll-bar-mode -1))


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When making a PATH declaration in your ~/.profile, make sure you append ":$PATH" so the contents in the original PATH variable do not get lost. For example, if your .profile has: export PATH=/bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin export PATH=/usr/local/bin/python The shell will have lost reference to the "stock" commands due to the second declaration. ...


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I found that adding this to my aliases didn't work for me if I wasn't already in a tmux session (i.e. it threw an error if I was just in a naked, tmux-less iTerm session). If you want to only set up this alias when you're in a tmux session, try this instead: if [ "$TERM" = "screen" ] && [ -n "$TMUX" ]; then alias ...


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In order to load also my .bash_profile, I've created an alias in my .bashrc with the following command : alias mintty='mintty.exe -i /Cygwin-Terminal.ico - &'


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If you are screen user then the screen hardcopy solution suggested by Joel Verks' post will work best -- assuming that you have a large scrollback defined in your .screenrc: defscrollback 10000 then you'd do: Display your screenlog file: $ cat screenlog.<screen_window_num> Use hardcopy -h (see screen man page) to save the current window ...


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Run if tmux info &> /dev/null; then echo running else echo not running fi



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