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i am not familiar with the fruit empire . but for generic telecommunication devices there is a standard protocol to send and receive sms text messages , the Hayes ( aka. AT ) command set . basically connnect the phone ( either via wire or bluetooth ) and pupulate a serial port . what we get is actually a MODEM . then talk hayes to it . details about how to ...


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Copying my answer from the same question @javabrett pointed out: You were well advised not to change your startup scripts, specially ~/.bashrc. Any "terminal detection" using current $TERM or $COLORTERM in ~/.profile is merely a guess, and may, as you said, cause trouble when using other terminals (say, Putty or xterm). The terminal emulator is supposed to ...


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Having server version isn't enough, to have concurrent rdp sessions, you need to add terminal services server role, which needs its own license. Your best bet to get a console, as in terminal window, is to have a free ssh server installed on the server, and then as many users as you wish can access the machine. Of course, it will not be graphical and it ...


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This page has some examples of how to swap two adjacent lines in the editor vi: http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Swapping_characters,_words_and_lines From the link above: To swap the current line with the one below, tap {esc} and type: ddp To swap the current line with the one above, tap {esc} and type: ddkP


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The default prompt in OS X is: \h:\W \u\$ computername:foldername username$ Set your prompt to this by placing the following in your ~/.bashrc: export PS1="\h:\W \u\$"


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I was able to fix this by recreating an older Ubuntu file 69-xserver-xorg-input-wacom.rules in /lib/udev/rules.d/69-wacom.rules/ thanks to Phi at AskUbuntu. The Stylus pen and eraser are detected in the xinput list and both have pressure sensitivity. I still have no idea how to update Wacom drivers properly, but the stylus works perfectly fine for the ...


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Finally figured it out. CTRL-S pauses sending any more text to the tty -- at which point you can (usually) do a CTRL-C to send a SIGINT to the subprocess to stop it from printing. That way, if you're in vim or IPython, you don't have to kill the process and can remain in your session. Also, in the SqlMagic extension of IPython, you can prevent it from ...


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This would make sense if you have set shell glob options so that * includes names beginning with ., and a wildcard that doesn’t match anything just disappears, rather than persisting as itself.  (E.g., if you don’t have any files whose names begin with foo, the command echo foo* prints a blank line rather than printing foo* literally.) If the above are ...


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TL;DR: Check the menu setting View->Show/Hide alternate screen. You may be in "alternate screen mode". Or try using the SHIFT key when you scroll to get the other scrolling behavior. ^[ is the printable representation of Control-leftbracket, AKA the escape character. Infocmp reveals that ^[OB is the xterm escape sequence for the down-arrow key (^[OA is the ...


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You can reverse the change: sudo mv /Users/new_name /Users/old_name Once reversed, you can change your user name the way Apple recommends: Launch System Preferences and click on Users & Groups. Control-click on the profile name that you want to change and click on Advanced Options. Change the Account name and/or Full name and then click OK Reboot your ...


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Go to System Preferences → Users & Groups and right click on your user. It will appear an Avanced Options menu. Then replace Home Directory with /Users/new_name. Logout and login again and should appear all your stuff.


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You can use the ampersand (&) after the command to put it in the background. If you want 3 instances of it running in the background, you could do the following: ./a.out& ./a.out& ./a.out& note it doesn't have to immediately follow the command, the following will do the same thing as well: ./a.out & ./a.out & ./a.out & You ...


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Yes there is. If you want to run them one after another: procces1; process2; process3 If you want to run the next only if the previous succeded: process1 && process2 && process3 If you want to run them simultaneously: process1&; process2&; process3&


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Just set filename expansion to insensitive: shopt -s nocaseglob And then your script machtes both: *.jpg and *.JPG: for i in *.jpg; echo $i; done file.jpg file.JPG file.Jpg


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Yes, You can put both commands mentioned below in a file with extension .sh like image_change.sh and execute from command line sh image_change.sh for i in *.jpg; do mv -i "$i" ${RANDOM}${RANDOM}.jpg; done; for i in *.JPG; do mv -i "$i" ${RANDOM}${RANDOM}.jpg; done;


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TotalTerminal is a plugin for the default Terminal application. Visor was renamed as TotalTerminal.


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Yes, it does. When you kill xterm, it kills ssh (unless you specifically instructed it to detach) which, in turn, terminates connection and thus the remote shell, which kills rsync. You could have prevented the trouble by using screen, tmux, or nohup. You can also use ps to figure out whether the process is running or lsof to figure out whether someone is ...


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Sorry, can't comment. Looks to me, first of all, as if your language is not recognized. What happens if you force the language for the syntax with: :setf C ?


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There are several tools available for running commands on many hosts at the same time synchronously. Some of them open up terminal windows in X (e.g. ClusterSSH), most are for running commands on CLI: http://web.taranis.org/shmux/ http://sourceforge.net/projects/mussh/ http://pydsh.sourceforge.net/ https://github.com/Ticketmaster/onall ...


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The answer is simple, almost evident in the question. Here's why: The shell zsh is not bash, it is a different shell. zsh will not use the default files built for bash: .bashrc or .bash_profile. These two files are startup configuration files for bash. zsh has its own startup configuration files. You can find out more about them here on the zsh intro page: ...


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When you use sudo -s you obtain a behaviour similar to sudo /bin/bash. The variable USER is set to root and not anymore to nescalante. You can put inside your .bashrc or, worst, in your .bash_aliases an IF THEN block to set your prompt when you are the root user. if [ "$USER" = "root" ] then export PS1="\[\e[36;1m\]\u@\[\e[32;1m\]\h \[\e[34;1m\]\w> ...


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Note: I have not tried this myself because I don’t experience this problem; of course feel free to edit this answer if changes are necessary. This is reported as a bug in Ubuntu Gnome, but I’m not surprised it also affects Debian. The solution appears to be adding . /etc/profile.d/vte.sh to the end of your ~/.bashrc or ~/.zshrc (depending on whether you use ...


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hcitoll scan if your device is there put its mac adress instead of one i used sudo hcitool cc 01:07:81:93:66:BC when prompted search for input pin button and insert your pin


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This is a known bug, and the easiest fix I found make one line : cp /etc/DIR_COLORS ~/.dircolors


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The answer I've found that works most like it does on my Linux box is to set an alias in your .bashrc: alias gvim='start gvim' This is still not the most ideal fix, but it feels a little cleaner to me than creating a function. Also it does not print the process ID line (example: "[1] 6840") when you run it or when you close the external window. This ...


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Yes there is. For example you can use AppleScript to achieve it: osascript -e 'tell application "Terminal" to close first window' The first window is always the currently active window. That's the one you want to close. Before closing the window, the Terminal may ask you, if you really want to close the window. This depends on your settings. You may have ...


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I think you want to read up on the bash help (man bash or GNU's BashRef.html) on Command Line Editing & Readline. There are a bunch of different commands to edit the command line, and they can be changed with an inputrc file too (default ~/.inputrc). Here's a clip about READLINE: READLINE This is the library that handles reading input when ...


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there is actually a npm tool called proxy-checker that does exactly what you ask (https://www.npmjs.com/package/proxy-checker). There is no easy way to terminate proxy connections automatically while hooking up new ones. It requires some type of web frameworks (here it is node.js) to allow such action to be complete efficiently (correct me if wrong). I think ...


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You can pipe a textfile as input into a program using the < command. So lets say you have a textfile called: MyFile.txt and it has the following info: CONNECT www.google.com:80 HTTP/1.0 bye   And you have a batchfile that connects, it would look like this: telnet www.proxy.com 8080 < MyFile.txt It would then do exactly the above. Open telnet, ...


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There is for all of your requirements (but not for saving them), and it is called screen. As for saving the sessions: As there is only one .bash_history per user, it is quite hard to keep different histories, I know of no such possibility. A session might easily have unrestorable state, e.g. think of having an SSH connection open - it is not possible to ...


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This is the command I was after: identify -units PixelsPerInch -verbose *.png | grep Resolution Adding it as the answer but l0b0's answer has some really nice info nonetheless.


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To find the path to a file simply open the terminal (you can use the search tool), drag the file from finder in the terminal and it will provide you its path. This is however problematic with files in the iCloud Drive as apparently, the provided path does not work when trying to access it from other programs than the one it is registered with.


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DPI is not a property of a bitmap image, it is a measure of output (in other words, physical media) dot density: "DPI refers to the physical dot density of an image when it is reproduced as a real physical entity, for example printed onto paper." So that is literally impossible. On the other hand, an image may contain information relating to how it should ...


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A proposal: #!/bin/bash while read -r n; do </dev/null ssh root@$n "ANYCOMMAND" done < ~/nodes


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Save the following lines in the ~/Library/LaunchAgents folder as a plist file such as caffeinate.plist . It will auto start when you log in. There are options to prevent screen, harddrive from sleeping. Just man caffeinate. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple Computer/DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" ...


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echo "characters" > /dev/usbxxx Simplest I can think of, and should work in zsh


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Short answer: echo "set horizontal-scroll-mode off" >> ~/.inputrc Bit longer answer: In an interactive bash shell, user input is handled by the READLINE library (look for it in bash man page to get more informations). Per bash documentation, the default behaviour is to wrap to a new line when the input is longer than the screen width. You can ...


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I can get close to what I want with the following: from unicodedata import name for i in range(0x10ffff): print unichr(i), name(unichr(i)) and saving the output, but I was hoping that someone else had already compiled and maintained something.


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Perhaps this is what you need: curl http://www.unicode.org/charts/charindex.html | grep "Small Letters, Cyrillic" It's imperfect, and a little slow, and the output could be cleaned up a little but it'll get you the character code for what you're looking for. You could save the page and scrub it with a little bit of sed/awk love to get a file with just ...


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A proxy would do what you want. As would a VPN, and with a VPN you won't have to set individual programs. A VPN isn't really called a Proxy. I'm sure any proper VPN service will do what you want. It's good to see from your browser when it isn't working, and when it is. I suggest that to find a VPN service and make sure that it is working, first disable ...


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Matthew is right; IF you have iCloud Drive turned on in sysPrefs, the iCloud Drive folder is there, he was just listing it relative to your user account. I'm not sure about the "com.apple.CloudDocs" though. The com~ files & plists for everything, including mobile apps, are NOT visible in Finder -only in Terminal. As of 10.10.1 if you're looking for ...


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More or less they also work well together: more * | less This shows the contents of matching files along with the decorated matching file and directory names.


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When I manually opened PowerShell and cmd.exe outside of Console2 to test this, I noticed that my fonts were a bit weird. That's when I remembered that I had set the language for non-Unicode programs to be Japanese. I switched the language back to English, which fixed this issue. The language can be changed at Control Panel > Clock, Language, and Region > ...


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I had this same problem and used * wildcard so it would work. My file name has dashes in it, such as my-file-2015-01-01.zip, so perhaps that I why I needed to use *.zip


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For bash I usually just type reset and it fixes anything that was left "funny." Looks like it's also known as tset but invoking each one does something a little different. tset, reset - terminal initialization When invoked as reset, tset sets cooked and echo modes, turns off cbreak and raw modes, turns on newline translation and resets any ...


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Use the stty command. Specifically, run this command: stty echo This will restore echo (printing input characters), which probably was turned off during the password prompt. To see all your terminal settings, run stty -a. While the input was hidden, that should show -echo somewhere in the output. After the fix, it should instead show echo in its place.



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