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4

To begin with, proceed with caution. You don't want to write anything at all to this disk if you want to keep everything. Photorec is a great little program for this scenario. It will dump everything it can find on to another drive. Names of files might be garbled or useless, and directory structure and folder names will be lost, but at least everything ...


4

Quite simply, its probably impossible if dd finished its work -if you stopped it partway, any data that wasn't overwritten should be recoverable. Testdisk is most useful when a system got formatted - and this usually involves 'marking' sectors as not in use, rather than erasing them. With modern drives, despite what the guttmann paper says, overwriting the ...


3

Is there anyway to recover the data, short of going to a data recovery service That depends on what is broken, but first stop trying to rescue the data. Depending on what is broken your recovery attempt might worsen the changes of rescueing anything. So if you really need the data on that hard disk contact a data recovery service. Their prices are high. ...


3

Unfortunately, the migration to Windows 8.1 was permanent. You cannot go back to the old preview or anything, the data was removed after you upgraded. You will have to reinstall all your applications. The partition table has nothing to do with your apps, as the partition the preview was on will have been erased and replaced with the new 8.1 data.


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As per the link you provided, PhotoRec ignores the file system. That's an advantage in some cases, since it can attempt to recover media even from badly damaged devices. However, it won't take file fragmentation into account. This explains why the smaller files work, but the bigger ones don't. I suggest you try another file recovery software to attempt to ...


2

Photorec does do that, its one of the more annoying things about it, but its meant to recover files in scenarios where its more important to get the data.It often is able to rebuild images from fragments in situation where commercial software can't. As such i tend to run recurva first (it preserves filenames) THEN testdisk in a recover scenario. (practically ...


2

A friend dropped her Acer Aspire One KAV10 on the ground while it was still powered on and it restarted with "No boot device found" "PXE-M0F" etc. Your problem seems similar but your solution wasn't really that intuitive so I'd like to elaborate on what I did to fix it. I burnt a copy of UBCD511, booted into Parted Magic (using defaults), opened xterm and ...


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the clue is in your second picture - the disk is a GPT Protective Partition. This means the data has been accessed on a system that does not properly understand GPT disks. The only Windows systems that understand GPT disks are XP (64 Biit only), Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8 The only way I have seen to retrieve the data without cost is to boot using a ...


2

Once you know a file system is corrupted, I would not let anything write to it. First thing I would do is copy the disk byte for byte to an identical disk or perhaps to a file on another disk. Once that's done, you can try various tools to recover your data. If a recovery tool hasn't worked, but has written to the disk, then you can always copy from your ...


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I really believe that if you have really important information in your disk, you should try professional help from companies that recover data. They are experienced in this field and could help you more than tutorials on the internet. But if you want to go on by yourself: Do not write anything in your drive. Keep it intact; Use a file recover tool. I've ...


2

I am Alex who posted above. I fixed my problem so I figured I'd write out my solution in case anyone runs into the same thing. First, for completeness, I'll mention that the Ubuntu disk utility was giving me extremely weird information that I didn't include in my first post: it showed two 438GB partitions one after the other on a 500GB hard drive. After ...


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Each of those is an alternate data stream (ADS), which, in general, is arbitrary extra data programs (or the OS) associates with a file in an NTFS file system. SkyDrive (now OneDrive) apparently uses an ADS called :ms-properties to store some sort of meta-data it uses about the file. See Brian's first comment on this thread. In a data recovery scenario, it ...


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It's dead by the looks of it. I'm afraid this isn't uncommon, memory cards do die quite regularly. Always have a backup (it sounds like you have if you aren't worried about the contents).


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I would run a (destructive) read-write test from linux. Consult the man page for all options, or run badblocks -v -s -w -t 0xff -t 0x00 /dev/sdb. It will leave the disk overwritten with 0 when its done.


1

Partial answer regarding the warning. I received the following from the developer of TestDisk: "The boot sector of each NTFS partition contains the information that the disk sector size is 2048 bytes. The Operating System returns a sector size of 512 bytes for this disk." Which explains part of my problem. I'll have to experiment with the sector size to ...


1

Sorry for the late reply james.. Perhaps this will help someone down the road. I am curious what ended up happening in your situation? Macbook Pro, Toshiba 500GB SATA drive. Computer recently refused to start up, blinking question mark folder on screen. Booting off a Mac OS X CD did not help, Disk Utility could not verify or repair the drive. Gave the ...


1

First of all DO AN IMAGE of this drive! I can't stress how important that is. Use g4l, clonezilla or just dd. When you have image work only on that image. To recover data try open source TestDisk http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk or Recuva from Piriform: http://www.piriform.com/recuva


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Without you mentioning an OS, you can run chkdsk from within Windows or fsck from Linux to repair file system issues.


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If the partition is visible (you can access to it but not to the files) you can try out Unstoppable copier, it will take a long time to copy the corrupted files, but it will recover all the visible data.


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Your partition table/file system may be corrupted during unsafe removal of Disk. In that case recovering partition will fix the problem. http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Step_By_Step This recovery example for testdisk guides you through TestDisk step by step to recover a missing partition and repair a corrupted one. You may also try following ...


1

The SD card is formatted in a way that mismatches the standard number of heads-per-sectors that is built-into in TestDisk for FAT32. This is just a warning and one can usually try and go ahead with TestDisk (with no guarantee of success, of course). However, TestDisk is primarily designed to help recover lost partitions, so might not be the tool you want ...


1

I tested the micro SD card of my phone with testdisk, and it says somethings about heads/cylinder mismatch. What is that? SD card should not have heads... No, not physically, however they do, or at least can have them logically. You can convert large-block addresses to cylinder/head/sector addresses and vice-versa, so technically you can use either ...


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First, to be completely safe, you should make a block copy of the entire disk. But you do need 500GB of spare space somewhere. Sectors were originally laid out in an actual Cylinder-Head-Sector geometry (back when drives had several platters, two heads each). That geometry became a fiction a long time ago, but disk partitioning often follows cylinder ...


1

Um, well, the first thing i'd do would be to inspect the actual BSOD - that is to enter the option after F8 to stop restarting when encountering an irrecoverable error. Then i'd google parts of the error and see where that leads me. I'm not quite sure what UBCD enables you to do, but if this is a filesystem related (NTFS) error, then i'd first try ...


1

Some moron, likely previously employed, at my workplace installed a second 500GB hard drive in two systems and set it to Dynamic. The first time I encountered this it bit me after I reimaged the system. 500GB of GIS data needed by an engineer ... I followed this and used the "c" option it mentions below to copy all files off to an external USB 2.0 disk. ...


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Try another USB-IDE adapter.


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Although it's theoretically possible the original partition has been left intact and all of the new partitions have been writing against the free space in the original partition... it's not very likely. Trying to recover that entire partition is probably going to give you no end of trouble, and it'll be much easier in the long run just to start from ...


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Knoppix 6.4 has useful new features for the mirror MBR and partition table recovery without stopping and starting a damaged drive.


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Running chkdsk /f c: from the command line fixed the issue for me. You may change the drive letter as needed, or run the same disk check through the drive's properties dialog: Click "Check now..." in the Properties dialog for the drive in question: Make sure "Automatically fix file system errors" is enabled:


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1st SLOW DOWN. There's about 8 things on your list that are likely to cause you loss of data and it sounds like you are acting out of desperation. Don't "install" anything on the affected drive. Doing so only increases the chances of overwriting something important. Get yourself an external drive or even a thumb drive before you try again and make sure ...



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