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41

The King of image transformation software is Image Magick. You can use this to do most image translations / conversions, and it's a respected (and therefore as safe) as these things can be. It's a command line tool, but more powerful for that. At a command prompt, simply type ... convert multipage.tif single%d.tif to create multiple tif files.


12

You can try ImageMagick. I'm trying this on Linux, but it's available for Windows as well. I just have to type: convert example.tiff example.pdf and I get a PDF. With just a little batch magic, you should be able to easily convert a directory of tiff files to pdf. Or, if you need all tiffs in the same PDF, you can do convert example1.tiff example2.tiff ...


9

What kind of file are you wanting? If you use the built-in screenshot shortcuts (⌘-Shift-3 / 4) it will save the screenshots by default as .png files. You can find more about this by checking out the SuperUser question: How to take screenshots in Mac OS X? You can also adjust the file type saved by the screenshot shortcuts (and screencapture on the command ...


9

There is a free Tiff Splitter: A simple WinForms app that opens a multi-page tiff file and saves all pages as individual tiff files. The input file can be selected through file browsing, or drag-and-dropped from the File Explorer. Requires .NET 4.0 / Tested on Windows 7


7

I have tested VLIV (the Very Large Image Viewer) with the moon image and it works flawlessly on my Windows 7 32-bit machine with 2 GB RAM. First, let me give some info on this program: Vliv is a Windows application that allows interactive viewing of gigantic TIFF images. Vliv is known to have successfully displayed a 121,600 x 97,280 image. ...


6

IrfanView has excellent batch processing abilities. IrfanView also supports command line operations i_view32.exe c:\myimages\*.tif /convert=c:\images\*.jpg Here's the link to Command line manual


5

Use Ghostscript. It gives you a lot of controls over various aspects of your TIFF output. Here are a few commandline examples: gswin32c.exe ^ -o mytiffpage.tif ^ -sDEVICE=tiffg4 ^ -dFirstPage=13 ^ -dLastPage=15 ^ input.pdf This will create a multipage TIFF G4 (compressed fax format, which is grayscale) from pages 13-15 of your input.pdf, with ...


4

No, but you can use Preview to convert the image. If you're doing this as part of a workflow, you could use Automator to do the conversation automatically. If you want a screenshot in PNG format, you can use ⌘+Shift+3 to take the screenshot. Using Automator The Automator utility has a task called "Change Type of Images" that takes in a set of images and ...


4

I'd put my bet on IrfanView - it's probably one of the better & lighter image viewers. You can also try FastPictureViewer - I haven't tried it personally but it claims to have DirectX hardware acceleration. (via product description: ) Integration with Windows 7 (Taskbar Jump List) and Windows Vista (thumbnail cache, "Browse with..." shell ...


4

Once an image is converted or created in jpg format, the detail is lost. The "compression" in jpg is not like a zip file in which the file is made smaller but every bit still exists. Jpg uses lossy compression -- this means that some data is lost during the compression process. The best you'll be able to do is to have a tiff file with the same quality as ...


4

Grab (the OSX screen capture utility) creates TIFFs by default, and there is no way to change that (The settings dialog does not offer a file format option, and I didn't find any other way). It does so irrespective of the default screen capture format (which is PNG unless you have a very old OS X version). That is, even if you use the defaults write "hack" ...


4

Bytes 0-1 represent two 8-bit values> yes bytes 2-3 are a 16-number? Yes, it should be a 16-value that represents 42 in the order expected from the first two bytes and, that bytes 4-7 are a 32-bit number yes. Its value is to be interpreted correctly based on the endian-ness confirmed earlier. The little-endian start, 0x49 0x49 0x2A 0x00 0x67 0x45 ...


4

Try convert or mogrify using ImageMagick. More instructions from ubuntuforums.org.


4

Microsoft Office Document Imaging (MODI) can split a TIFF using the Page>Move pages to a new file option (select pages you want to split out from the original file first). MODI is installed as part of Office 2003, and although I believe a version was included with office XP/2002, I think it was an optional install and may not have the TIFF writer necessary ...


3

You can return the number of pages in a tiff using identify -format "%p" multipage.tif.


3

If you have existing PDFs, ImageMagick can convert them to image formats like TIFF.


2

Use PrimoPDF and Gimp. Both are freeware. Print your word documents to the PrimoPDF printer. Open PDF's as bitmaps in Gimp and add your signature. You can even print it back to PDF (via PrimoPDF).


2

TIFF is an image format. You should be able to open them in most image editing applications. Unfortunately, this format is not conducive to text editing. Your best bet MAY be to try to OCR the images if you need editable text. If you just need to modify the existing image you could draw white boxes over bad values, just like using white out on a paper ...


2

You could use word. Just add the image to word and resize it to fit into the printable region (Use one corner to resize, as resizing it another way would stretch the picture). Right click the image, then select "Format Graphic" -> "Layout" -> "Behind Text". Afterwards you could put text above the image. If you want you could use Text Boxes which would be ...


2

I read"convert format" and I immediately think Image Magick. convert input.tiff output.png it's unlikely that it won't know what to do in your situation.


2

You could try GraphicsMagick which is a derivative of ImageMagick and claims to have many improvements, including performance. I have not tried it myself.


2

If you use imagemagick? and say convert -compress none *.jpg Picts.tiff Tell me if it works right for you


2

Irfanview is great for simple editing tasks (resizing, cropping,...) and handles TIFF files. It is also free of charge (but not free software)


2

Apart from IrfanView (see above) you can give the Paint.NET a chance (download for example here): http://download.cnet.com/Paint-NET/3000-2192_4-10338146.html If all you want is a quick image retouch, Photoshop is overkill. Paint.NET, on the other hand, is an open-source freeware editor with all the essentials, including tools to crop, rotate, and ...


2

You could open the .DOCX file with a Zip decompression utility (either the one built into Windows, or perhaps 7-Zip or alike). Once you have it open you can navigate to the "Word" folder contained in the file, and the "Media" sub-folder inside that. In there you should see all of your images (etc.), and you can just copy/drag-n-drop them out onto the ...


2

Have you checked in Firefox the handling of "QuickTime Image" ? Chrome might have an equivalent setting somewhere, but I am not a user. This is found in Tools / Options / Applications :


2

Go to chrome:plugins and click + Details in the upper right corner. There, you have the ability to disable Quicktime as the handler (npqtplugin7.dll) for image types including tiff and jpeg. It was the last of the Quicktime group for me. This will leave the other six Quicktime handlers on.


2

I believe Paint.NET is limited to 8-bits per channle but I don't have a reference for that. Mainstream Gimp is limited to 8-bits per channel. Variants of Gimp used by the film industry have greater bit-depth Film Gimp has vast dynamic range: 16-bits per channel (64-bit RGBA) Film Gimp is also known as CinePaint


2

.TIFF and .TIF are the same file types. I would recommend manually removing/adding an f and see if you can convert it.



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