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50

You can actually accomplish this using the system clock. Click on the tray clock At the bottom, click Change date and time settings Click the Additional Clocks from the top menu bar Tick Show this clock and modify the time zone to suite your needs. Hit Apply Example:


27

"Knowing the current minute" requires having an accurate clock. "Knowing the current hour" requires having an accurate clock and knowledge of which time zone currently contains the device. So, getting the minute right is easier than getting the minute and the hour. Set the time zone to where you're currently located. The device doesn't contain a GPS, so ...


16

Edit: After a few days of using the method I originally posted, I discovered that the RealTimeIsUniversal flag, as an unmaintained leftover from Windows NT, is actually pretty flaky and impractical in general. Every so often, at seemingly random intervals, the Windows clock would revert from UTC to local time, which was extremely annoying (and resulted in a ...


14

A tool I found to be easier to use is dpkg-reconfigure. Use: dpkg-reconfigure tzdata You will be given a multitude of choices, including some that are not included in tzselect.


14

Since your using Windows 7 the clock desktop gadget is one option. You can have multiple, name them and make them always on top. There are alternative versions that are more compact with similar settings.


10

The time zone is an artefact of conversion from "instants" to a human-readable date-and-time in some calendar. Computers do not like human-readable formats (not as much as humans, at least), so they usually store instants in a zone-neutral format. For instance, in the NTFS file system, time stamps are stored in UTC. Hence, the file time modification is ...


7

Simplest way that I know of is: echo "Europe/Zurich" > /etc/timezone dpkg-reconfigure -f noninteractive tzdata


6

One third party app that will allow you to do have both times always shown in the tray is StoicJoker's T-Clock2010: http://www.stoicjoker.com/tclock/


6

Click on the clock and choose "Change date and time settings..." Click the "Internet Time" tab. Is it set up to synchronize the time with time.windows.com? If it is, try unchecking that box, saving the settings, and rebooting to see if that fixes your problem. If it isn't checked already, try checking it and making sure it is set to time.windows.com. Here ...


5

You can see some hints in the Microsoft documentation for FILETIME. There is no provision for a time zone in the structure, but the text states that NTFS stores all file times in UTC.


5

I decided to continue wasting time on troubleshooting problems in tools that are supposed to save me time... and I rebooted the system several times in order to have a more controlled observation of what's going on: It turns out that mere booting to Ubuntu changes the BIOS time! Apparently, Ubuntu uses UTC time, while Windows 7 uses local time (as has been ...


5

Not all versions of cron support running jobs using a time zone other than the system's. If yours does, it's likely that the specification should be TZ=GMT or TZ=UTC (without the angle brackets). In some cases, the variable would be CRON_TZ. The best thing to do is check the documentation specific to the particular system. See man 5 crontab.


4

Ilius, I think I've come across this problem before. First try to set the system time correctly. (ntp/whatever) Then, run hwclock --systohc This should reset your hwclock to the system time, and should be persistent across reboot. would you let us know if it works out?


4

I doubt that very much(that they do it by windows). Maybe they know the timezone at the location of your IP. Or some forums ask you for your timezone and you are telling them. Try changing the time in windows and see if they pick it up - they won't. And if you had multiple computers set to different time zones they won't know. You could hide your IP(so ...


4

Zones like Etc/GMT+6 are intentionally reversed for backwards compatibility with POSIX standards. See the comments in this file. You should almost never need to use these zones. Instead you should be using a fully named time zone like America/New_York or Europe/London or whatever is appropriate for your location. Refer to the list here.


4

Timezone is a part of the "systeminfo" command output.


4

If you have Vista (or Windows 7), the built-in clock widget allows you to set a different time zone per instance, and give it a name. So, for example, you could set an instance to Sydney time, and name it "Sydney", and it will show the name on the clock itself.


4

Windows timestamps are time zone aware. However, your mechanism for file transfer may not be.


3

Check your clock sync settings in Windows. It may be adjusting the clock with an internet source and changing the clock.


3

Linux usually uses a tool called hwclock to interface with the hardware clock. Depending on your distribution, you should be able to modify the system startup scripts to make hwclock reread and store the time using current system timezone. In Ubuntu, you can enable local time mode by editing /etc/default/rcS to: UTC=no I know, not exactly what you asked ...


3

Check out GeoSense for Windows which claims to be able to provide a semi-accurate geo-location device for your computer. This will require some kind of internet connection (WiFi preferred) to be able to get your location. I would hope that once Windows 7 has a vague idea of where you are, by using this service, then it will update your timezone ...


3

Update: The canonical answer (for which Ynhockey deserves credit) appears to be: dpkg-reconfigure tzdata My original answer is below. I would simply have deleted this answer entirely but superuser.com doesn't allow accepted answers to be deleted. http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/213 says the simple way to edit your timezone is to ...


3

The file modified date is stored in an absolute way so that it will show the correct time no matter the time zone. So when you change your time zone, it changes the displayed modified date on the file to be correct. Notepad++ looks for a change in the displayed modified date, and when it sees one it displays this message.


3

It is quite easy to get your system's timezone, as set in the OS, through JavaScript on the browser. Type these in the location/url: javascript:alert(new Date()) javascript:alert(new Date().getTimezoneOffset()) The first shows the current time in your timezone, usually with a timezone offset and name, like "GMT-400 (EDT)". If that's too much parsing ...


3

(Copying my comment as an answer, since it turned out to be the solution; I guessed right.) So cron jobs are being scheduled in UTC (Europe/Paris is at a one hour offset from UTC). The Vixie cron man page says: The daemon will use, if present, the definition from /etc/timezone for the timezone. What's in /etc/timezone? Have you modified ...


2

Some distros such as Fedora provide a mechanism where you can set CRON_TZ= to override your default timezone. From the Fedora man 5 crontab The CRON_TZ variable specifies the time zone specific for the cron table. The user should enter a time according to the specified time zone into the table. The time used for writing into a log file is ...


2

You might look at this document: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee488025%28v=winembedded.60%29.aspx for example set: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Time Zones] "@": REG_SZ @="Eastern Standard Time" where: "Eastern Standard Time" is the name that should match entry in the registry tree: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Time Zones\Eastern Standard Time] Its ...


2

This Perl script should do what you need (assuming you don't need precision to the 10-6 of a second): #!/usr/bin/perl -w use strict; use Math::Round; ## Get current date (epoch) my $date=time(); ## Get the seconds offset, rounding to the nearest second my $ntp=nearest(0.1,`ntpdate -q $ARGV[0] | gawk '(\$NF~/sec/){print \$(NF-1)}'`); ## Get the server's ...


2

I think setting the registry entry from this article will allow your time to display properly. Per the article, create a registry file in Notepad with the following in it: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\TimeZoneInformation] ‚ÄúRealTimeIsUniversal‚ÄĚ=dword:00000001 Open the .reg file you just created, ...


2

You're probably somewhere in mainland Europe, or Africa? Because the device probably has the correct time. Correct UTC time, that is. Your local wallclock will be showing UTC+2, because that's what humans prefer.



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