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The normal case is that Linux systems have the RTC (real-time clock) set to UTC, and the conversion to local time is done in userspace based on time zone data and the TZ environment variable. This is "less bad" because it keeps the system RTC monotonically increasing, and applies any time zone magic later, ensuring for example that no files will normally ...


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I recently faced the same problem and this is how I fixed it. You need to do a little change in both OS. I started with Linux first. Run these following commands as root. ntpdate pool.ntp.org This will update your time if not set correctly. Now set the hardware clock to UTC with this command. hwclock --systohc --utc Source Now boot to Windows and ...


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Neither is wrong, but using UTC is more right. The RTC doesn't have a time zone; it's just a dumb wall clock. If your local time zone honors DST (of which there are many flavors, and rules change arbitrarily), then twice a year, you have to go and change it. The OS will do it for you, but if the RTC is UTC, the OS does the UTC->local translation anyway -- ...


0

If you dual boot and there are time conflicts between Windows and Ubuntu, this occurs because Ubuntu store the time on the hardware clock as UTC by default while Microsoft Windows stores the time as local time, thus causing conflicting times between Ubuntu and Windows. You need to set your Linux system to use local time as explained here in this ...


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I have done some research about pfSense and found that it is a very heavily customized version of FreeBSD. The standard init(8) and rc(8) procedures are replaced with PHP functions and most of the standard configuration are not saved normally but are created from the XML configuration file at system start up. Also the kernel is heavily patched to implement ...



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